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September 15, 1961 - Image 27

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE TWE

uarterbacks Create Problem

INJURIES INCURRED:
Grid Face Mask Good or Bac

By TOM WEBBER
Coach Bump Elliott 'has re-
peated over and over again that
depth will be his biggest problem
this year.
This shouldn't be the problem at
quarterback where the roster lists
four well known names.
Or, then, maybe that's just the
problem. Having four quarter-
backs, that is.
First
First there's Dave Glinka. Last,
year Olinka was the first sopho-
more in a long, long time to start
the season as Michigan's quarter-
back. After a satisfactory year as
Oregon',Star
Identifies
B ribemaker
Michael Bruce, a University of
Oregon football player, told a
Senate subcommittee last' week
that he was offered a bribe to fix
last year's Michigan-Oregon foot-
ball game.
Bruce told the subcommittee
that two gamblers had offered
him $5,000 to fix the game so
Michigan would win by at least
eight points.
In a dramatic scene. before the
committee Bruce pointed out
Frank Rosenthal as one of the
men who presented the bribe..
Rosenthal, who hails from Chi-
cago and Miami, is -termed by the
subcommittee as a big time lay-
off bookmaker.
Budin, Other Briber
The other man who offered the
bribe was identified as David
Budin, but very little was said
about him.
Bruce explained that the bribe
attempt came on the evening of
Sept. 23, 1960, the night before
the game, when Rosenthal came
to his hotel room to make his of-
fer. Rosenthal also told Bruce that
hie would, give him an additional
$5,000 if he could secure the serv-
ices of Oregon quarterback David
Gross.
Bruce brought news of the
bribe immediately to his coach,
and the Michigan State police
were. quickly notified. The police
managed to pick up Budin on the
spot, but failed to find Rosenthal.
He was later picked up and
brought before the subcommittee.

a sophomore quarterback he is
once again back to led the attack,
but with onehitch.
He suffered a slight shoulder
separation (the throwing arm
naturally) and hasn't been able
to scrimmage since the third day
of practice. He's working out with
the team again and is throwing
the football once more. Elliott says
he'll be ready for the opener, how-

ever, and apparently hasn't con-
sidered an alternative.
Glinka's Shadow
Behind Glinka._is senior letter-
man John Stamos. Stamos blos-
somed into a defensive star last
year, but showed offensive in-
capabilities. Thus far in fall prac-
tice, though, Stamos has brighten-
ed Elliott with his improved play
at quarterback.

Listed third and presently run-
ning the second team is' Forest
"Frosty" Evashevski. Frosty lifted
some eyebrows with his passing
during spring practice and was
born and raised by his athletic
director father on Michigan's
winged-T offense. Elliott warns,
however, that he is "only" a soph-
omore.
Chandler-?
Last, but not least, is junior
Don Chandler. Chandler, you'll
remember, is the boy who almost
had his left leg torn off at the
knee in last year's Michigan State
game. Elliott calls dhandler a
"better than good" passer and the
twinkle in Bump's eye indicates
he might be better than that.
The trouble is that Chandler,
although his knee has heeled, is
very much hampered by it. "He
can't move back from the line
very well," Elliott said.
And that's the list.
In rating the four, Elliott called
Glinka "below good as a runper,
but the best we have." He labeled
Chandler as the best passer -
"although we aren't selling Glinka
and Evashevski short as passers."
Probably Stamos
But when pressed hard Elliott
said that ifhe had to play a game
tomorrow without Glinka, he'd go
with Stamos.
As for going with four quarter-
backs, Elliott indicated that he,
hoped one of them would get hot
and pull away from the others.
"The team seems to run better
under one quarterback," he said.
And so with two weeks re-
maining before the opener, that's
the Michigan quarterback situa-
tion.

<0

By JOHN DOBBERTIN
Did you ever snicker at that
odd looking helmet that grid ace
Denny Fitzgerald wore last year?
It didn't appear sturdy and it
looked like something from around
the turn of, the century-but ac-
cording to recent research by Dr.
Richard C. Schneider of the Uni-
versity Medical Center, Fitzger-
ald may have had the safest hel-
met of anyone on the field.
Dr. Schneider reviewed 18 re-
corded deaths resulting from
football injuries in the 1959 sea-
son and found that 14 of these
were caused by head and spinal
injuries.
Helmets Responsible
Dr. Schneider and H. O. "Fritz"
Crisler, University athletic direc-
tor, believe that the tough plastic
helmet with the protruding face
guard is responsible for these fa-
talities.
"One of the most troublesome
things is the face mask," Crisler
said. "I don't think it serves the
purpose for which it was intend-
ed. It was designed to protect the
face, but in an attempt to do that
you've created leverage with re-
sults worse than before."
Projecting Mask
In some cases the face mask
projects as far as 31/% inches in
front of a player's nose. If this
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

"guard" is struck with a hard
blow there is the possibility that
the helmet, held on the head by
the chin strap, will slide back and
the tough plastic will jam into
the back of a player's neck.
Crisler also pointed out that
the helmet "guard" sometimes
slips into the face of an opponent
with possible nose injuries result-
ing.
University Experimenting
The University is presently ex-
perimenting with a new type hel-
met which has a soft material in
back.
Frank J. Cavanaugh, head
trainer of the Cornell University

grid team, suggested in Newsweek
(Aug. 21) that "with a softer hel-
met we could do away with the
face mask completely."j
Supporting the need for such al
change and Dr. Schneider's re-
search are the records of the
Committee on Injuries and Fatal-
ities of the American Football
Coaches Association.
Progressive Trend
According to the committee, 208
fatalities recorded since 1947 show
"a slowly progressive trend away
from abdominal and internal in-
juries and a corresponding in-
crease in head and spinal injur-
ies.

"The helmet is very, very new
and like anything in medicine it's
going to take a while to sink in,
be tested and proved out," stated
William Bender of the University
Medical Center.
Dr. Schneider suggests that a
chin strap be developed which re-
leases under certain pressures,
and he also recommends that the
helmet's back edge have a flange
of ,sponge rubber to reduce the
striking force on the neck verte-
brae.
Bender suggested that possibly
the old leather helmet is the an-
swer.
Maybe Fitzgerald was right.

Ztil e

£friigan

43Iati

SPORTS SECTION

F

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street

Sabbath Service of Welcome, this FRIDAY, SEPT. 15, 7:15 P.M.
Zwerdling-Cohn Chapel
PROF. PHILIP J. ELVING, Speaker
Followed by Oneg Shabbat

MIXER

ONE-FOURTH OF THE PROBLEM-Wolverine Coach Bump
Elliott finds himself con^-onted with a quarterback problem-not
too few, but too many, four of them, in fact. One of them is shown
here trying to win the job.

COLLEGIATE CLUB
of.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
6:30 P.M. "What Can A Student Believe About
Christ?".

SUNDAY, September 171 7:30 P.M.
Dancing, Refreshments, Registration
ADMISSION free to Hillel Members - For others, $1.50

YOM KIPPUR SERVICES

Speaker: Richard Adlen, M.I.T., Boston.
Sunday Worship: 10:30 A.M. & 7:30 P.M.
(TEMPORARY QUARTERS: YM-YWCA,
5th Ave. & East Williams.)1

KOL NIDRE-Tuesday, September 19,7:30 P.M.-
RACKHAM LECTURE HALL
Sermon: DR. NORTON MEZVINSKY, History Dept.
Seats reserved for Hillel Members until 7:15 P.M. (Doors open 6:45 P.M.)
Wednesday, September 20
Traditional 9 A.M. Rackham Lecture Hall
Sermon: ROBERT M. BERGER, 63
Reform 10 A.M. Rackham Amphitheatre (4th Floor)

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