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September 15, 1961 - Image 25

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE -MICHIGAN DAILY

Washtenaw Voters DefeatI
Proposals for Park System

ANNUAL REPORT:

Police Claim

cU

Aids Social Research

Students

lid. i

In the midst of confusion over
e two joint proposals,, Washte-
aw County voters defeated a
.an for an 11,700 acre park sys-

tem.
Two proposals were on the bal-
lot, one to be voted onnby prop-
erty owners only. Both had to
pass for the park system to be
approved.
The first proposal (for proper
ty-owners only) was to levy a
special, quarter-mill county-wide
tax f& 10 years to finance the
park system. It was defeated 6,-
615 to'6,542, a 73 vote margin.
The second proposal was to
raise the 15-mill limitation so the
extra tax 'could be collected. It
passed, 7,593 to 7,390.
City residents strongly favored
the. issue while rural voters op-
posed it.

Confusion arose, however, over
the location of the two proposals
on the voting machines. An an-
nexation question concerning the
City of Ann Arbor and Scio
Township appeared between the
park proposals in those two
areas, and consequently voters
had difficulty straightening out
the issues.
The, Scio annexation was de-
feated by residents of the area
in question. Voters in three sub-
divisions-Scioto Hills Number
Fne, Dexter Avenue Hills, and
'Evergreen Little Farms - dead-
locked 36-36 on the question,
barring its passage, while Ann
Arbor residents approved it, 4,-
840 to 1,528.
The proposal needed favorable
votes in both areas to pass.
Total voting in Washtenaw
County fell far below the state-
:wide average, despite better than
average turnouts in the two cities
-Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti.
Only about 16,875 of the 80,259
registered voters in the county
turned out. This.was 21 per cent,
compared to a 25 per cent average
across the state.

During the last fiscal year, 160
social science research projects
were among the over 1,000 research
projects carried on at the Uni-
versity.
Researchers probed from the
confines of the schizophrenic
mind, to the breadth of national
economy in their studies of the
behavorial sciences, education,
humanities, public health, and
social studies.
According to the 39th annual
report of the University Researeh
Institute, $26 million was spent
on projects for private industry,
governmental and military units,
as well as science and education
in general, with the total expen-
ditures for sponsored research
during the year amounting to
$22,356,850.,
"Four hundred ninety seven
members of the teaching faculty
participated in research activities
supported by outside funds," the
report states, and 1,748 students,
of whon 1;028 were graduate stu-
dents, were employed in sponsored
research programs.
Behavioral Sciences . .
Members of the psychology de-
partment and' of the Mental
Health Institute of the University
Medical Center headed the list
of those studying the behavioral
sciences.
The members of the psychology
department studyed such problems
as personality dynamics, motiva-
tion and psychological measure-
ments. A five-year study of schiz-
ophrenia in which the Ypsilanti

State Hospital is cooperating was
administered by the MHRI.,
Psychologists at the Cooley
Electronics Laboratory surveyed
various phases of the learning
process and the Institute of
Science and Technology projects
included investigations concern-
ing battlefield surveillance.
Education.. .
An observational study of class-
room behavior and methods of
assesing and improving the ef-
fectiveness of college teaching
was conducted by members of the
education school and the psy-
chology department.
Members of several educational
units cooperated on a project con-
cerning the measurement and
evaluation of the effects of phys-
ical environment on the teaching-
learning proces in school build-
irigs, the report stated.
The public health school is con-
ducting basic research on possible
virus origins of "cancer and on
other diseases known to be of
viral origin, such as influenza.
Some of the work is being done
in the school's Bureau of Public
Health Economics and the affili-
ated Institute of Industrial Health.

PAPER-BOUND
BOOKS'
Huge stock for all classes
PROMPT SERVICE
On Special Orders
OVERBECK'S
BOOKSTORE

Near Eastern studies and Slavic
languages.
Listed among the projects are
the development of criteria for
Russian language materials, pre-
paration of a reference grammar
in modern Persian, and speech
analysis.
Another research project is an
archaeological survey, conducted
by the staff of the Museum of
Anthropology.
Social Studies..**
The Research Center for Group
Dynamics of the Institute for So-
cial Research, the socialogy de-
partment, the social work school,
the public health school, the Cen-
ter for Research on Conflict Res-
olution, the economics depart-
ment, the Institute for Hurian
Adjustment and other units on
campus are conducting research
in social studies.
Among the continuing -interests
of members of these groups are
juvinile delinquency, welfare pro-
grams, unemployment, education,
work environments, hospitaliza-
tion and consumer behavior.
Studies have included "aspects
of aging," "student development,"
"Economic Atlas of the Soviet
Union," "Political Development
and Change," "Family Communi-
cation," and "Costs of Higher
Education."
Unit Returns
To Frll-Tune
Army Service
In accordance with the recent
step-up in U. S military activities,
an Ann Arbor Army Reserve unit.
the 478th Engineer Co. (Depot),
will return to full-time military
service Oct. 1.
It is scheduled to be moved to
Granite City,, Illinois by Oct. 15
for a maximum of twelve months
of active duty.
This unit was previously ac-
tivated in May, 1959. The men
have , attended three summer
camps in Granite City plus weekly
two hour meetings in Ann Arbor,
Lt. James N. Snaden, the unit's
executive officer, and a University
student said.
Snaden said that this new pro-
gram will consist of sixteen weeks
in training. After this period it
is uncertain whether the men will
remain in the States or be shipped
overseas. They will probably re-
main in the States.
Although no University profes-
sors are included in this unit,
there are several students in-
volved.
Research Pool
Session Set
Students interested in joining
the Student Government Council's
Research pool are Invited to at-
tend an open meeting at 4 p.m.
Thursday in the Student Activi-
ties Bldg.
The pool, recruited and main-
tained through SGC, will consist
of students, interested in working
in some area of concern to the
Council.
The functions of the pool will
be to assist both the individual
Council members and the internal
committees in finding informa-
tion and to, form a pool from
which members for various com-
mittees may be selected.

Stole Couch,
Two University students and a
third who attends Wayne State
University were arraigned in Mu-
niciple Court on a charge of steal-
ing $1,300 in furnishings, includ-
ing a large red davenport, from
the Sigma Phi fraternity 'house,
426 N. Ingalls St.
Ann Arbor police said that
Richard N. Adams and Hugh J.
Sheean, both from the Univer-
sity, and Michael P.. Mikesell,
from Wayne State, allegedly en-
tered the fraternity house during
the early morning hours.
Sept. 18 was the examination
date set by acting Municiple Court
Judge Alfred Sullivan for all three
cases. The trio were released after
posting individual bonds of $300.

Delicious Hamburgers...15c
Hot Tasty French Fries...A0c
Triple Thick S... 20c
2000 W.Stadium Blvd.

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1200 Acetate
1800 Acetate
2400 Mylar .

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Sterpo Systems from $185.00

THIS WEEK'"S SPECIAL
Glaser Steers No. 77 Changer
with base - $39.95... was $64.95
FAST, ACCURATE SERVICE'
on
phonographs and equipment
DIAMOND NEEDLES from x5.95

GUARANTEED
ALL THIS AND MORE

at

HI-l & TVCENTER
across from HI [l1 .Auditorium

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phones:

5-8608 . . 5-8607 . . . 2-2500

rr__________

GUILD

HOUSE MOVED?

to

802 MONROE STREET
(Corner Oakland across from Law School)
CLOSER TO CAMPUS THAN EVER!

ALL ACTIVITIES RESUME AS USUAL
Sunday, September 17-7 P.M. Program, get together
Tuesday and Friday Noon " Luncheon discussions, lunch 25c
Watch Michigan Daily Organization notices for all future announcements.

SPECIAL INVITATION TO NEW STUDENTS
BE OUR GUEST

* ' A .A P.

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1 11 Q,-I,4- 1 -,%, S-AS III-tir

v1'1 P!~

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