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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 15, 1961 - Image 23

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

IRECT DIAL:
Bell Telephone Extends
Service to Ann Arbor

'6

Ann Arbor dialers may now
reach over 50 million phones in
the United States and Canada by
direct dial,
Bell Telephone Company instal-
led over $115,000 wprth of equip-
ment this summer to effect a
direct dial system for the Ann
Arbor area. There is no change
in local procedure in the home
code number (313) area.
Ann Arborites may dial Chelsea,
Dexter, Manchester, Plymouth,
Saline, South Lyon, Whitmore
Stuy Shows
tredit Rises,
Debt Constant
Consumers who now use in-
stallment credit devote 17 or 18
per cent of total personal income
to repayment of debts, two U ni-
versity professors report.
In a chapter of "Hire Purchase
in a Free Society," Profs. Paul W.
McCracken and James C. T. Mao,
of the business administration
school, indicate that the ratio of
debt repayment has remained con-
stant.
Further data, gathered by the
University Survey Research Cen-
ter, shows that the ratio may even
have declined.
The professors explain that the
growth in consumer installment
credit does not indicate that fam-
ilies are getting deeper into debt.
In, fact, it only shows that more
families are npw using credit op-
portunities.
The chapter points out that the
use of credit in the United States
in not associated with the poor
but is, rather, a middle class phe-
nomenon. Also, more families in
the younger age groups use credit
and contract personal debt.
Approximately two-thirds' of
those people in each income group
between r$3,000 and $10,000 have
some personal debt. A higher pro-
portion of those in the highest in-
come brackets, $10,000 or over,
have personal debt than those in
the lower brackets.

Lak and Ypsilanti without extra
toll charge.
To dial other areas in South-
eastern Michigan, area 313, per-
sons should dial "1" to reach the
direct dial equipment, then dial
the desired seven digit number.
In out-area 'calls, other than
$13, dial "1," then the area code.
On long distance calls, the opera-
tor will request the number of the
phone from which the call is
made. That will be .the only point
where an operator enters the pro-
cess of direct dial.
Operators will howevei-, con-
tinue the usual procedure for
person -to - person, collect and
other special calls.
Cryogenics
H VU,
Has Fture
Cryogenics-the science of ex-
tremely low temperatures-is in-
creasing in importance in fields
such as rocketry and electronics,
the engineers and scientists at-
tending the 1961 Cryogenics Engi-
neering Conference concluded.
"The whole cryogenic field re-
ceived a terrific shot in the arm
from space uses of cryogenic flu-
ids, but now what we have learned
is having considerable influence
in other fields," Prof. Gordon J.
Van sWylen, conference chairman
and chairman of the, mechanical
engineering department, observed.
These days the use of liquid hy-
drogen and even liquid helium
(which boils at 45 degrees below
zero Fahrenheit) is becoming al-
most routine, he continued.

Taylor Talk
To Precede
Open House
Prof. Harold Taylor, president
emeritus of Sarah Lawrence Col-
lege will speak to all interested
and incoming students at 4:00 p.m.
today at Hill Aud. on "The Future
of American Youth."
Prof. Taylor is an educator, au-
thor of over 200 articles in books
and journals of philosophy and ed-
ucation, an editor, and a teacher
of philosophy.
Since retiring from Sarah Law-
rence he has toured Asia and the
Soviet Union under a special grant
from the Ford Foundation and has
conferred with political leaders
and educators about the educa-
tional and social problems of Asian
countries. He has also engaged in
lecturing at colleges and universi-
ties across the country.
Taylor is also active in the Na-
tional Student Association and the
New York State Committee on
Discrimination in Education.
His address will preface open
houses at a majority of the reli-
gious centers on " campus Friday
evening.

Students
Win Awards
For Writing
Eight University students re-
ceived awards for creative writing
in the 1961 Hopwood summer con-
test.
Top winner in the fiction divi-
sion is Margaret E. Bailey, '62,
who received $75 for "Three Short
Stories." Prizes of $50 went to
William D. Elliott, Grad, for a
novelette, "-'The Fiddler" Nancy
R. McCortney, '62, for "Collec-
tion of Three Short Stories"; and
Dee Anne Schroeder, '62, for "Two
Short Stories.".
Peter A. R. Calvert, Grad, re-
ceived the sole drama award, $50
for a sort play entitled "The
Union, Forever!"
In the esay division, a $50 prize
went to Sara Weeks, '62, for "Love
etters: An Interpretation of Ger-
ard Manley Hopkins."
Two $50 poetry prizes were
awarded: Norman Linville, '62, for
"Poems"; and William D. Elliott,
grad, for "European.Sketches and
other Poems."

A college educated individual
earns $100,000 more in his life-
time than high school graduates,
a government and college survey
reports.
This amounts to an 11 per cent
per annum return on the indi-
vidual's "investment," Hollis W.
Porter, director of the Founda-
tion for Research in Human Be-
havior reports in his doctorial dis-
sertation, "Using Technical and
Social Knowledge in Economic
Development."

This "investment" includes the
loss of earnings while in school,
tuition and other direct costs
paid by the student and his fam-
ily, and in direct costs such as
scholarships.
If everyday living expenses such
as food and housing were not in-
cluded, Peter points out the rate
of return would be much higher.
Intangible
Ninety per cent of the increase
in goods and services produced per
person in the United States in the
past 50 years has come from such
intangible investments as re-
search, education, technology and
social organization.
National Bureau of Economic
Research studies indicate that only
ten per cent of the increased pro-
ductivity can be properly assigned
to increases in tangible, physical
capital.
Investment in education has
risen 4.5 times as fast as the
growth in production of goods and
services since 1900.
In this same period total costs
of secondary and higher education

Dean Gibson Dies
After Long Illness
Associate Dean William C. Gib-
son of the School of Public Health,
died August 17, after an illness of
several months.
Prof. Gibson, 46 years of age,
joined the school in 1950. He serv-
ed four years as secretary of the
Public Health School, as acting
dean during 1959-60 and was ap-
pointed associate dean in Jan.
1961-

College Ups Student's Income

SEEK D

have risen from four to 25' ier
cent of the .country's gross physi-
cal capital formation.
'The stepped up pace of invest-
ment in education, research, and
other activities which represents
greater use of social and technical
knowledge help explain produc-
tivity increases amounting to .1.7
per cent annually during the past
century," Peter observes.
Durner To Head,
Air Force ROTC
Lt. Col. Dwight E. Durner, for-
mer comptroller with the 49th
Tactical Fighter Wing in Ger-
many, has been named chairman
of the University Air Science De-
partment. Durner, World War II
aircraft navigator and holder of
the Distinguished Flying Cross and
Air Medal with two Oak Leaf
Clusters, replaces the retired Maj.
Robert M. White. Durner gained a
BA degree from the University
in 1950.

A goal of 20,000. pledges h
been set by the University's E
Bank to help insure a continuin
supply of eyes for persons wit
corneal blindness, the Medic
Center has announced.
Since the Michigan Eye Cc
lection Center was established
1957, the eye bank has receive
donations of 166 'eyes. Of thee
103 were used for cdneal tran
plants performed at Universi
Hospital; the others were used f
operations in Detroit, Flint an
Owosso, and for research in -pe
fecting technques of transplana
tion.
Eyes can be used regardless c
the donor's sex or color.

Eye Ba
Sets G(

Fall Orientation Convocation
DR. HAROLD TAYLOR, Educator-philosopher
"The Future of American Youth"
4:00 P.M.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15
HILL AUDITORIUM

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