100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 15, 1961 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SECTION

giltb

A6F
,4
73 a t t,,

f

SECTION
TWO

TWO

Seventy-One Years of Editorial Freedom

WELVE PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1961

TWELVE PAGES

;-w_

SSA Supports

Resolutions

COMPLETION DATE-1963:
Science Building Progresses

On. HUAC,

'In Loco

Parentis'

-Al
Regents Ask/
New Budget,
For Buildin

Group Sets

Radock Gets Position
As Nelson Leaves
(Editor's Note - Following is a
roundup of some of the major cam-
pus and University news stories of
the summer.);
;r
By MICHAEL OLINICK
The. Regents formulated a new
capital outlay program this sum-
mer, and the University got a
new director of University Rela-
tions to replace Vice-President
Lyle M. Nelson who went to Stan-
ford.
The state council of college
presidents appointed an executive
director from the University cam-
pus. State legislators continued to
keep an eye on state~ higher educa-
tion.
These were some of the top stor-
ies arising during the University's
summer session. Here are the de-
tails of these and other important
news stories:
Capital Outlay . .
Taking a long look at capital
outlay needs, the Regents approved
a program calling for $106.1 mil-
lion in state funds for new con-
struction.
They also asked for $10.6 mil-
lion for remodeling and additions
to present structures in the re-
quest which covers the next five
years.
At the top of. "the list was the
Physics-Astronomy Bldg., already
under construction. The Regents
asked forst Lem ainder of the $7
million allocated the project for.
next year (about $2.7 million).
Second in the appeal to con-
struct 26 new projects is the School
of Music, slated for North Campus.
State lawmakers considered a
plan of Sen. Carlton H. Morris (R-y
Kalamazoo) to double capital out-
lay for higher education for the
next five years.
Morris, who heads a special in-'
terim senate committee, said the;
Legislature would "very likely" get
a recommendation, for a long-+
range spending program in excess
of $100 million. The multi-million
dollar. proposal will probably be+
financed by a new tax program,;
Morris said, but declined to give
any details on the tax.;
See RADOCK, Page 17

NSA DEBATE-Kay Wonderlic, Northwestern University delegate to the recent fourteenth Congress
of the National Student Association, addresses an open meeting of students. Miss Wonderlic ad-
vocated changes in the NSA structure which, she claimed, would make it more representative of
American student opinion. The congress met for ten days on the University of Wisconsin campus.
dentsAttack Committee

The following are excerpts fromv
the legislative plenary session of
the National Student Association

Congress last month.
HUAC - USNSA urges that all
its member campuses support the
abolition of the ' uHouse Commit-
tee on Un-American Activities.-
USNSA reaffirms its belief in
the inherent right of the individual
in a free and open society to ex-
press any opinion which is not
slanderous, libelous or constitutes
incitement to a concrete criminal
act without fear of recrimination.
It disapproves of the HUAC on
the grounds that no "propaganda
should be restricted in a democra-
tic society and that 'Congressional
investigation of "propaganda" can
serve no legislative purpose which
is consistent with the Constitu-
tional guarantee against abridge-
ment of freedom of speech.
In practice HUAC usurps judi-
cial and executive power and has
also enroached upon the area of
:nvestigation mandated to _other
committees of the House of Rep-
resentatives.
It has also directly and in-
directly enroached on University
autonomy and the legitimate free-
doms of students and faculty. In
so doing, HUAC has conditioned
individuals to ap inner fear of

controversy and has threatened
the vigor of free institutions upon
which a democratic social order
depends.
However, recognizing that the
Congress has both the right and
the duty to investigate acts of
espionage, sabotage and con-'
spiracies to overthrow the govern-
ment by force, USNSA recom-
mends that these functions be
exercisedhby the judiciary com-
mittee of the House and Senate
respectively.
Weaker?
During the spring term Uni-
versity women once again out-
scored their classmates in grade
averages.
The women received a grade
average of 2.72 as compared to
the men's average of 2.60, ac-
cording to the undergraduate
scholarship, report of the Of-
fice of Registration and Rec-
ords.
However the 2.65 average for
all undergraduates was higher
than the 2.60 over-all average
for the fall semester.

IN LOCO PARENTIS - USNSA
condemns the tradition of "in
loco parentis" and the educational
habits and practices it justifies.
(The theory of "in loco paren-
tis" establishes the . university as
paternal guardian over the moral,
intellectual and social activities of
the student.)
"In loco parentis" permits ar-
bitrary and extensive repression of
student pursuits and thereby im-
pairs the total significance of the
university as a center for the
conflict of ideas.
Paternalism in any form in-
duces or reinforces immaturity,
conformity and disinterest among
those whose imagination, critical
talent and capacities fob integrity
and growth should be encouraged
and given opportunity for develop-
ment. Insofar as "in-loco parentis"
removes responsibility for personal
decision-making from the indivi-
dual student, it distorts and weak-
ens a significant phase of the
educational process.
USNSA calls on faculties and
administrations to open the uni-
versities to fuller and more mean-
ingful student participation in
those community affairs which
See NSA, Page 20

LtC
In Structure
Delegates Assemble
For Annual Congress
By JOHN ROBERTS f
Editor
The National Student Associa-
tion Congress last month took
forthright stands on such topics
as the House Un-American Activi-
ties Committee, Cuba and the doc-
trine of "in loco parentis."
Focusing on "The Expanding
World of the American Student,"
the representatives from some 350
colleges and universities assembled'
in Madison, Wis., for NSA's four-
teenth annual congress.
Though NSA itself had been un-
der attack by conservative and re-
form groups during the previous
year, the convention made only
minor organizational changes, and
NSA emerged with, its basic char-
acter very much intact.
The HUAC issue, long a battle-
ground for conservatives and lib-
erals, and fanned by a year-long
controversy over the film, "Opera-
tion Abolition," sparked the most
prolonged and substantive debate.
Last year in Minneapolis, the
13th' congress'.approved a resolu-
tion calling for the reform or abo-
lition of the committee because it
exceeded its mandate and violated
due process. This year, after an in-
tensive and often bitter floor fight,
the delegates declared that the
committee's mandate was itself
unconstitutional and asked for
outright abolition.
.Committee's Mandate
(When it was created, the House
Un-American Activities Commit-
tee was charged to make investi-
gations of: "The extent, character
and objectives of un-American
propaganda activities; the diffu-
sion of foreign or domestic propa-
ganda within the United States
which attacks the principle of our
form of government as guaranteed
by the Constitution'of the United
States; all other questions in rela-
tion thereto which would be of as-
sistance to the Congress in prepar-
ing remedial legislation.")
The legislative plenary session
of the Congress of faced with two
resolutions on HUAC. The first
had been reported out of comlmit-
tee by a majority vote and called
for abolition. The second was a
See NSA, Page 19

Assistant to the Vice-President 1
for Business and Finance John G.
McKevitt estimates that the new
physics and astronomy building
will be ready for occupancy in
early 1963.
Located at 501 E. University
Ave., the structure will be an 11-
story brick building, costing $3.2
million.
It will include ' classrooms, lab-
oratories and offices.
Erected on a 264 by 396 foot
site, the structure will be 246 by
218 feet at its base and will rise
140 feet in the air.
The Ann Arbor building and
engineering safety department ap-
proved the plans August)17. Funds
had been appropriated by the state
legislature for preliminary archi-
tectural studies in 1955.
Following approval by the Re-
igents, additional appropriations
were obtained earlier this year.
The architect is Albert Kahn,
Inc., of Detroit, and the landscape
architect is Johnson and Roy of
Ann Arbor, the University's cam-
pus consultant.
The construction of the physics
and astronomy building is only
one facet of a project including
the building of a cyclotron and the
Institute of Science and Technol-
ogy on the North Campus.
Cinema Guild
Sets Petitions
The SGC Cinema Guild Board
,has announced petitioning for
sponsorship of movies by campus
organizations.
Interviews will be held Friday,
Sept. 21, from 3-5 p.m., and Satur-
day, Sept. 22, from 9-12 a.m. and
2-4 p.m.
Petitions are available on the
first floor of the S.A.B., and are
due completed, together with a
financial report, by Friday, Sept.
21.

State and national authorities
have approved the civil defense
plan sitbmitted by Ann Arbor Civ-
il Defense Director H. R. Shipman.
The plan has been devised over
a two and a half year span of co-
operation with city'and state civil
defense personnel. Its acceptance
makes Ann Arbor one of the few
communities in Michigan having a
state accepted plan.
The organization and operation
of the -city government in an
emergency is outlined by the plan.
The NMayor and the Common
Council, with the city administra-
tor second in command, would re-
tain charge of the city, but the
plan provides for the civil de-

fense director to assume a posi-
tion of command just beneath the
administrator.
Shipman said that "recent dis-
aster areas in the state have made
it clear 'that without advance
planning, confusion will exist and
much valuable time will be lost
in the initial phase of an emer-
gency which could result in un-
necessary loss of life, and destruc-
tion of property."
An additional civil defense
measure was a basic course in
civil defense conducted this week
for the general public. Also, any
county. officials who had not tak-
en a similar course were required
to attend.

NEWEST 'U' PROJECT-Pictured is an artist's conception of
the new Physics and Astronomy Building already under con-
struction on East University Ave. Costing some $3 million, the
structure is planned for occupancy in 1963.
EMERGENCY OPERATION:
Defense Plan Wins Approval

Es'1

m

r

The Michigan Union is Your Key to Success
Join the Union ActivIties Staff
at the Fall
ACTIVITIES OPEN HOUSE
Help direct projects like:
j ORIENTATION
WORLD'S FAIR
HATCHER OPEN HOUSE 4
" DIAT .',' A DT FF'TIVA"I|\f

V

r

.. ...
J;y
.'"LY
1}i
K51
f:1
1:9
l:
t+v
{f
;M1{
{{;:
:1J
rl
t}:
{}r.
iC
.J.y
X14
}}}
:1

"f.... .. ..J. .... . ,. ....YJ y...:::..tiJ ..*.. rt .:;*.."Y.. . ; .,...r. .t.Y ...t*,*":"!.'::.
Weblcone tU. '( 1. £uent4
Make your Headquarters at
B.IM U E NL"BIGS
for Famous Name' Bed-Spreads
such as BATES, CANNON, MORGAN-JONES

-'-
muII mmom e

in, a wide range of patterns and colors
from 14.98 up

-4

"Famous Name" BLANKETS'
in various blends or all wool
F from 4.98 up
ae i~s rc~asu n n a.. a rwm+a.m".m mm®smi mm

,....>;. : ti::..:.:
}:
.;::
::
sW
v f::
'
E
M'

I

BED-PILLOWS... from 3.
KOOLFOAM, DACRON, or DOWN FILLED

99 up

I

i

DECORATOR FOAM PILLOWS
rounds and squares
R2.98 and $3.98
Ready Made Curtains and Drapes

Cafe, Shorty and Full-Length Styles, plain, floral and
abstract designs, in a wide range of prices.

-m..mmm - -mm - --m- - - - - - --m mm.... mm...... mm..mmmm m-...... mmmmmm mm,
FABRICS by the YARD
The most complete line of yard goods in tovn. Cottons,
Synthetics, Woolens and Curtain and Drapery Fabrics in a
wide range of prices.
____d__Css__ALSO
Sheets and Pillow Cases, Bath Towels, 'Mattress Pads and Covers,

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan