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September 15, 1961 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

:..r.....;:

THREE REASONS WHY YOU'LL LIKE OUR
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i>

By RONALD WILTON
As a result of drilling in Lake
Superior this summer geologists
from the University of Minnesota
and the University have formu-
lated a new working hypothesis
about the creation of the Great
Lakes..
According to Prof. James H.
Zumberge of the geology depart-
ment, a leader of the expedition,
evidence suggests that the Great
Lakes may have been created
chiefly by the flow of ancient
rivers rather than glacial action.
"We are not ruling out glacial
excavation entirely," Prof. Zum-
berge said, "but on a percentage
basis it appears that pre-glacial
river action accounted for be-
tween 75 and 85 per cent of the
creative process with glacial ex-
cavation relegated to between 15
and 25 per cent-."
Cores Raised
The suporting evidence lies in:
cores of material brought up from
the bottom of the lake by the
drilling aparatus. "Preliminary
examination of the cores seems
to indicate that glacial deposits
were laid down in deep bedrock
valleys that probably existed long:
before the recession of the last
ice sheets,' Zumberge said.
These valleys, which seem to
pre-date the ice-ages, were formed
for the most part by a great river

in Lake Superior," Zumberge
noted. "This was hypothesized
fifty years ago. However this old
theory supposed that these were
small localized ,valleys which were
grieatly enlarged by subsequent
! glacial activity."
Near Split i Rock Lighthouse,
4 five miles off the Minnesota coast
... the expedition found a very large
bedrock valley which no one knew
existed.
The ship, a 173 foot former navy
patrol vessel converted, to marine
exploration and underwater dril-
ling work was anchored in 938 feet
of water. The drill penetrated
684 feet into the bottom of the
lake when the drilling pipe' ran'
out before the bedrock was,
reached.
PROF. JAMES A.ZUMB9RGE The top fifty feet of the sample
drills Lake Superior jwas lake sediment and below that
were red glacial deposits laid down
system which present evidence by the ice. In the bottom was dis-
scovered an older glacial deposit
suggests flowed in a south-western which differed from all examples,
direction rather than toward found up to then, Prof. Zumberge
Hudson Bay as had previously said.
been supposed. Explains Lack
"Through the action of ice In explaining the lack of pipe,
sheets which pushed deposits into Prof. Zumbrege said that the ex-
these valleys, natural dams were pedition had not anticipated hay-
created. These obstructed drain- ing to drill through more than
age and created the five Great 200 feet of bottom before hitting
Lakes," Prof. Zumberge said. bedrock. "We were quite surprised
"It' is not new to suggest streams when it happened."

In the sediment deposits pollen
Sgrains were found. "Examination
of these can tell us what the sur-
rounding vegetation was like and
from this information we can de-
duce the type of weather at the
time. This is then compared with
other climate curves to establish
the approximate date of the de-
posits," he explained.
Another discovery was that the
depth of the lake bottom has
undergone some kind of change.
"We found that submerged shallow
water features are now in deep
water. Either the water has risen
or the bottom of the lake has
sunk," he noted.
Notes Cost
Zumberge said that the project,
which ran the whole month of.
July, cost $150,000. $100,000 of
this was a grant from the National

Science Foundation with the
maining $50,000 being split
tween the two schools.
There are two reasons why
body has ever drilled into
bottom of Lake Superior be
Zumberge said. One, it was
expensive. However, as a resul
the International Geophys
Year there has been a growing
terest in the earth sciences v
a corresponding increase in g
ernmental spending.
The second reason was I
until now there was still infori
tion on the history of the La
to be learned from the lakeshc
This information has just al
been exhausted, he said.
The drilling operations v
carried out in water depths ra
ing from 500 to nearly 1000 f

DISCO tNT GLACIAL ACTION:
Geologists Research Creation of Great Lakes

Ann Arbor Sets Completion
Of City Street Improvements

I

I

CITY PROJECT:

Ann Arbor is completing street
improverents on East Stadium
Blvd., South Division, South
Thayer and South Forest Sts.
The four projects are expected.
to cost the city $160,000. South
Forest St. is being widened ten
feet from South University Ave.
to Hill Street. The $24,000 proj-
ect includes resurfacing.
The widening and resurfacing
of South Division and East Wa~sh-
ington Sts. to Packard Street will
cost about $63,000. Four blocks of
Division Street are being widen-
ed eight feet.

South Thayer St. is slatec
the widening and resurfacin
one block at $21,000. The pr(
,also includes sidewalk consi
tion.
Two outside dirt lanes on f
er side of East Stadium 1
were paved, and the four p
lanes were resurfaced. The s
will have six paved lanes bet'
White St. near the bridge.
South StateSt. and Brock
Boulevard near Tappan Ju
High School.

Research P
The last day of August saw Ann
Arbor's 209 acre Research Park
get its first customer in Detroit's
Federal-Mogul-Bower Bearings,
Inc. which purchased six acres for
a 23,000 square foot laboratory.
Construction of the laboratory
is expected to start in the spring.
FMB's Ann Arbor director Gor-
don B. LeBrasse predicted some
staff expansion from the present
20 persons employed in the office
on West Stadium Blvd., and that
the laboratory will be equipped
with the latest testing devices.
Praises Move
Gov. John B. Swainson praised
the move, saying that it is anoth-
er substantial step toward achieve-
ment of greater diversification of
our economy.
He predicted that other indus-
tries will follow FMB's lead.
The Research Park was launch-
ed in July, 1957, when the board
of directors of the Ann Arbor
Chamber of Commerce authorized
the establishment .of the Econom-
ic Development Committee, which

ark Gets F irstOc'a

was aimed at presenting long-
range plans for municipal growth
and attraction of greater indus-
trial activity to Ann Arbor.
The city, at its own expense ini-
tially, has -planned about $400,000
worth- of improvements to the
site, including sanitary and storm
sewers, water mains, and surfac-
ing of streets.
Park Unique
The park, one of the few of its
kind in the nation, lies south of
Ann Arbor, although is a part of
the city, bounded by South State
St. 1-94, and Ellsworth Road,
near Stone School Road.

The first municipal improve-
ments are part of about $1 million
that the City of Ann Arbor will
spend on the project. Improve-,
ments are being made prior to
development in hopes to lure in-
dustry more easily to the western
part of the park. The eastern part
will not be developed until the
western portion, is well-along.
When all the land is sold, all
parties having invested money
will be paid a proportionate
share, and thus the city can real-
ize a good portion of its present
investment.

4,

1,

141

C OoL L C 44

I

814 South State

601 East Williams

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