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September 15, 1961 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-15

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12A

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

12A THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PLAN SEMINARS, TALKS:
To Consider Challenge of War

By DENISE WACKER
Challenge will inaugurate its+
second year of lectures, discus-
sions, and seminars with a lec-7
ture on "The Causes and Pur-
poses of War" by Prof. L. Larry
Leonard of the Duke University
Law School on Sept. 18 at 8:00,
p.m. in Rackham Auditorium.
The keynote lecture stresses the
current Challenge program deal-
ing with the problems which both
the United States and the Soviet
Union must face in preparing for,
and engaging in, a nuclear war.
It will be followed by five Sunday
meetings in Auditorium A at
which a panel of two to four peo-
ple will discuss the lecture and
answer questions from the floor.
Military Strategy
The first of these meetings will
be on the subject of "Military
Strategy and Potential," and looks
into military-strategical concepts
since the end of the Second World
War and how they were revamped
by the United States and Russia
for nuclear war.
"Decision Making in the Unit-
ed States," the second discussion
topic, will be concerned with how
military decisions are made in thips
country and how much influence
the Pentagon, Congress, and busi-
ness have in ultimate decisions. It
will also analyze the problems of
the numerous branches of the
armed forces and the difficulties
which arise due to inter-service
rivalries.
Contrasted with this is the next
Sunday meeting which deals with
"Decision Making in the Soviet
Union."
Disarmamnt
The fourth panelndiscussion,
"Economic Consideration," asks;
it is possible to disarm when the
defense spending in our.economy
is great, and any cut-down would
lead to unemployment in many
industries? Looking ahead, the
panel will discuss the possibilities
of rebuilding our economy after a
nuclear war.
The final meeting, "Social,
Psychological, and Biological Con-
siderations," is designed not to
tell what nuclear waz might mean,
but what affect the testing of
atomic weapons and the threat
of war has had and is having on
world populations.
J;rom December 1 through 5
Chs lenge will hold discussions on
the various alternatives to nuclear
war. Keynoting this series will be
Prof. Eugene Rabinowich, editor
of Atomic Scientists and profes-

sor of physics at the University
of Illinois. Also speaking will be
Prof. Robert Osgood, professor of
political science at the University
of Chicago and author of "Limit-
ed War."
In addition to the keynote
speech on alternatives proposed,
there will be a lecture on "The
History of Negotiation" which will
look into peace conferences and
other negotiatory meetings which
have already taken place,'and will
analyze the reasons for their fail-
ure and the question of hope for
future negotiations.
Following this there will be two
speeches, one dealing with the de-
terrent theory which the United
States presently holds-that war
can be avoided by building up such
Art Service
For Students
Opens in SAB.
The University-sponsored art
rental service,. located in the Stu-
dent Activities Building, is open
for the Fall term.
Every semester students are able
to rent prints of the paintings of
well-known artists. The rental
cost for one semester varies from
25 cents to $1.25 depending upon
the value of the print.
The selection of prints ranges
from Renaissance works to ex-
pressionist paintings. They are
exhibited on the walls of the third
floor of the* SAB. Students may
choose prints from those on dis-
play.
The University has established
a fund to continue this service,
which began 13 years ago when
the J. L. Hudson Co. made the
first donation.
PAPER-BOUND
BO OKS
Huge stock for all classes
PROMPT SERVICE
On Special Orders
OVERBECK'S
BOOKSTORE
Read and Ulse
Daily. Classilieds

a reserve of nuclear weapons and
becoming so strong that no ene-
my would be tempted to attack.
The other speech will deal with
arms control and disarmament.
These speeches will be supple-
mented by seminars led by fac-
ulty members and others.
Go To Yale
The idea for Challenge was
brought to the University in
spring, 1960 by five students who
had gone to Yale University to
observe their Challenge Program.
The response in favor of such a
program at the University was
quite enthusiastic, Arnold Taub,
'64, coordinator of Challenge,
said.
The Challenge Program was in-
itiated here in September, 1960,
with a series of lectures and sem-
inars on "The Challenge of Amer-
ican Civil Liberties." Henry Steele
Commager, Norman Thomas, Ar-
thur Goldberg, John Hanna, Har-
old Taylor, and Paul Blanchard
were among the speakers present-
ed by Challenge at that time.
During the second semester the
program dealt with "The Chal-
lenge of Emerging Nations." It
was with this series of lectures
that the Sunday meeting was de-
veloped. Such speakers as Hans
Morgenthau, Owen Lattimore,
Walter Reuther, Hubert Hum-
phrey, and Sir Hugh Foot spoke
to Challenge.

MSU Plans
Peace Corps
Instruction
By The Associated Press
EAST LANSING - Some 35
men and women will begin Peace
Corps training at Michigan State
University next week, officials in
East Lansing have announced.
The Washington office says that
the corps candidates will train for
teaching assignments at the Uni-
versity of Nigeria in Nsukka.
The project, the twelfth an-
nounced by the corps, will be the
first in which an entire group is
assigned to a foreign university.
The period of service has been set
at two years in the university
which MSU personnel helped es-
tablish last fall.
The volunteers will undergo
eight weeks of training at East
Lansing, receiving instruction in
English, mathematics, teacher
training, vocational education,
economics, political science, his-
tory, home economics, agriculture,
guidance counseling, natural and
social science.
Dean of MSU's international
programming, Glen L. Taggart,
and Associate Dean Ralph H.
Smuckler made the over-all ar-
rangements for assistance at the
African university.

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