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September 15, 1961 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRID-A . *.PTRIN MZX.

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I~RIflAV QUP'U'1~'U

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ODIORNE SPEECH:
Business Avoids Liberal

.4

Economists

On Africa
Assistant Secretary of State and
former Michigan governor G.
Mennen Williams will speak on
"Changing Africa" at the Uni-
versity's ninth annual Conference
on the Economic Outlook Nov. 9.
His talk will conclude the first
day's session which will be opened
by Prof. Harold Levinson of the
economics department.
Prof. Lawrence Seltzer of Wayne
State University's economics de-
partment will conclude the second
day of the two-day session with a
critical review of the conference.
The conference will include re-
marks by Prof. Paul McCracken of
the business school, Vice-President
and Dean of Faculties Marvin L.
Niehuss, Prof. Daniel R. Fusfeld of
the economics department and A.
J. Karchere, manager of economic
research of International Business
Machines Corp.
Besides Williams the principle
speakers are: Gerhard Colm, chief
economist of the National Plan-
ning Association; Prof. Warren
Smith of the economics depart-1
ment; Prof. Eva L. Mueller of the
economics department and pro-
gram director of the University's
survey research center; Margaret
Matulis, of the McGraw-Hill eco-
nomics department; Prof. Daniel
Suits of the economics department
and Prof. Guy Orcutt of the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin economics de-
partment.
New Courses
To Replace
Psychology 31
This year, the psychology de-
partment is offering two new
courses to replace the previously
offered introductory course, psy-
chology 31.
The two courses approach the
' subject in different ways. One
course, psychology 100, is an in-
troduction as a natural science;
and the other course, psychology
101, is an introduction as a social
science. The credits from each
course meet different distribution
requirements.
Psychology 32 was also elimi-
nated and in its place there are
honors sections of both 100 and
101.
A new introductory laboratory
psychology 110, was also started
this year. The lab can be elected
with either 100 or 101. Psychology
majors must take 100, 101, and
110.
All the new courses will feature
more individual study. Students
will be expected to use more mnia-
tive and there are optional lec-
tures to attend along with recita-
tion sections.
Students will also be expected
to explore a small area of know-
ledge in depth. The changes are
but one step in the remodeling of
the whole psychology department.
IhlI

Company recruiters often avoid
the liberal arts graduate and the
non-conformist, Prof. George S.
Odiorne, director of the Bureau of
Industrial Relations charged re-
cently in a speech to the Midwest
College Placement Association.
Speaking at the Mackinac Is-
land convention, Prof. Odiorne
noted that recruiters mislead stu-
dents about work requirement and
do not know the future manpower
needs of their own company.
"Despite the lip service which
many senior company officers pay
to the hiring of liberally educated
men, it is the professionally train-
ed person who gets the most at-
tractive job offer.
Effects Registration
"This has a tangible effect
upon course registration in the
more academic subjects which
have as their objective the mak-
ing of a better man who can per-
form as a citizen of a free society
rather than a good employe,"
Prof. Odiorne declared.
Recruiters prefer the older,
more mature looking student who
will "fit into the organization as
the recruiter perceives it back
home," he said.
By failing to mention that hard
work and application will be re-
quired, the recruiter is mislead-
ing the student. "The prevailing
image is one of power, size, influ-
ence, and fun."
Lack Study
"Most corporations not only
cannot forecast their manpower
needs beyond the amount neces-
sary to fill their current recruit-
ing requisitions, they have not be-
gun to study methods of under-
Auditorium's,
Front Rows
Now 'The Pit'
A new orchestra pit in Hill
Auditorium will be used for the
first time Oct. 24, when the
Mazowsze dancers from Poland
appear as part of the Extra Con-
cert Series.
Constructed during the summer,
the pit is created by removing the
first three rows of seats in three
sections of the auditorium.
Steel beams allow the seats to
be taken up in sections of four
seats and then one. The flooring,
which was especially installed for
this' purpose, is then removed,
forming a pit large enough for a
40 to 50 piece orchestra.
The construction was carried
out at the suggestion of the Uni-
versity Musical Society under the
supervision of the University
plant department.
"It was quite an engineering
process," Executive Director of the
Society Gail Rector said. "The
six-inch floor, installed in 1913
when the auditorium was built,
had to be blasted out."
The wall of the pit, located be-
low floor level, was part of the
original building, indicating that
an orchestra pit had been intend-
ed in the early stages of its con-
struction. Lack of funds probably
prevented the completion of the
pit, Rector said.
Three doors leading from the
basement into the pit were cut in
order to facilitate entrance for
musicions.
Due to the cost of removing the
seats and flooring, the new or-
chestra pit will be used only twice
this year, for the Mazowsze danc-
ers in the fall and for the Ameri-
can ballet threatre in the spring.

taking such projections," Prof.
Odiorne said.I
Although college recruiting is al
highly professional field, a lack of
understanding between the uni-
versity and the business world
exists, Prof. Odiorne noted.
Recruiters see the university asI
having faculty aloof from busi-
ness and defensive toward the
student. They often guide the best
students to academic and profes-
sional careers and fail to screen
candidates for the recruiter.
The universities, recruiters be-
lieve, have an unrealistic attitude
toward business. It is less respec-
tive and appreciative of the prof-
it motive than it should be and
it fails to understand the prob-
lems of company communications,
behavior and politics, Prof. Odi-
orne explained.
On the other hand university

Arts Grads
placement officials see recruiters I
as being unappreciative of its
goals, concern for students, and
its loose organizational structure.
Not Understood
The youthful mind is also not
understood by recruiters, univer-
sity officials feel. They look for
20 year olds with 40 year old
minds.
The corporation is considered
to be wielding too much power
and influence through the re-
cruiting process, he noted.
College and university place-
ment officials must seek to "de-
pressurize" recruiting by promot-
ing fewer but longer and more in-
tensive interviews, by insisting on
better company literature, by edu-
cating recruiters, and by refusing
to+ serve as "an arranger, fixer,
match maker, hand holder, and
chaplain," Odiorne suggested.

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