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November 21, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-11-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Britton-Reports Fuzziness
lampers Scientific Writing
P 'I

LACK OF FACILITIES:
Raps Restricted Music Study

By CAROLINE DOW
Obscure technical writing is not
limited to the United States r.or
to engineers, Prof. W. .Earl Brit-
ton of the engineering English de-
partment reports.
During a sabbatical leave in
1960, he interviewed 50 educational
institutions, industries and publi-
cations and research establish-
ments of Western Europe to de-
termine the extent of poor scien-
tific writing.
Complaints on the inability of
both engineers and scientists to
communicate clearly were consis-
tent through his interviews, Prof.
Britton says. Technical writers
seem to" miss , the point of the
matter they are reporting because
they assume its obviousness:;
The problem did not seem to be.
'determined by the amount of ed'i-
cation that the person received as
inability to express technical ideas
was almost universal among scien-
-C ,
ON STAGE e IN PERSON

tists of all levels of education,
Prof. Britton says.
Four European traits combat
efforts to obtain clarity in tech-
nical exposition he concludes. The
insistance that education should
be broad and basic in European
schools prevents specialized cours-
es to deal with this problem
Pressure for time in the cur-
riculia and the state control of
education also discourages change.
Continental respect for the ex-
pert and professor do not force
them to be clear, and the attitude
that the less the layman under-
stands, the more learned the pro-
fessor, combats clarity, he said.
The historical orientation of Euro-
pean engineers and scientists in-
fluence them to bury the point of
the article in the middle, where it
'is in chronological context, he
adds.
Informal courses in technical
writing are appearing in Europe
and some industries are requiring
engineers to keep technical terms
to a minimum.,
Mississippi Editor
To Speak Toda y
A Mississippi newspaper editor,
whose ridicule of those who de-
fied the Supreme Court school
decision of 1954 lost him his local
subscribers and advertisers, will
speak on "The Uncalled Quack" at
3 p.m. today in Rackham Amp.
P. D. East the editor of The
Petal Paper of Petal, Miss., is also
the author of "The Magnolia
Jungle."

By MARTHA MacNEAL
"We hear the word 'discrimina-
tion' mentioned often," Dean of
the music school James B. Wal-
lace said recently.
"An example of discrimination
in its most basic sense is the fact
that non-music majors are un-
able to take applied music courses
at this University.
"Of 25,500 students, only the
600 studying professional music
can take practical study of a par-
ticular instrument or of voice."
Students Withdraw
Many students have withdrawn
and transferred from the Univer-
sity during registration when they,
discovered that music study was
unavailable to them because of
lack of facilities and faculty time,
he added..
"A few desperate literary college
students have even bicycled over
to Eastern Michigan University foi
applied music courses."
Now with 72 faculty members.
the music school has grown rap-
idly from a conservatory attached
to the University in 1940.
Students Increase
After World War II, the school
soon faced the postwar expansion
of the student body, and some-
thing had to be curtailed.
"Much to the embarassment and
chagrin of the University, non-
Mnusic majors had to be excluded,"
Dean Wallace explained.
Applied music courses now serve
less than one per cent of non-
music majors, and in some de-
partments, notably organ, "ab-
solutely zero per cent."
Only School
"This is the only school in the
United States which cannot give
musical instruction to literature,
medicine and business adminis-
tration students to help them
develop avocational interests that

could mean a lot to them in later
life," Dean Wallace stressed.
Applied music is taught in a
one-to-one ratio of instru'tors to
students. Group instrument class-
es are given to beginners, but the
difficulty here is holding the class
down to about eight students.
It is also imperative that these
students have about the same pro-
APO Provides
Bus Service
For University students who plan
to fly home via Metropolitan of
Willow Run Airports, the Willow-
politan bus service is once again
in operation.
The schedule for Bus A, the only
one going to Metropolitan first, is
leave the Union at 12 a.m., arrive
at Mosher-Jordon Halls at 12:15
p.m., Hill and Washtenaw at 12:30
p.m., Willow Run at 1:40 p.m.,
Metropolitan at 1:10 p.m.
Bus B's schedule is: Union at
2:40 p.m., Mosher-Jordon Halls
at 2:55 p.m., Hill and Washtenaw
at 3:10 p.m., Willow Run at 3:40
p.m., Metropolitan at 4:10 p.m.
The run of Bus C is: Union at
4 p.m., Mosher-Jordon at 4:15
p.m., Hill and Washtenaw at 4:30
p.m., Willow Run at 5 p.m., Metro-
politan at 5:30 p.m.
Bus D will follow this schedule:
Union at 5:30 p.m., Mosher-Jor-
don Halls at 5:45 p.m., Hill and
Washtenaw at 6 p.m., Willow Run
at 6:30 p.m., Metropolitan at 7 p.m.
The bus schedules are for to-
morrow. Tickets may be bought
in the Fishbowl. The rates are
$1.25 to Willow Run and $1.50
to Metropolitan.
Willowpolitan is a service of
Alpha Phi Omega.

ficiency level; otherwise the class
defeats its purpose. Group classes
have never been tried for students
outside the school of music, lie
noted.
25 per Teacher
Each faculty member teaches a
maximum of 25 hours per week.
At one-to-one ratio, few students
can be accommodated.
"Applied music is a kind of
natural honors program in that
the professor works with the in-
dividual and pushes him as far as
he can go," Dean Wallace said.
"The one-to-ope ratio causes tre-
mendous space and time problems.
The student should also have
practice time and space available."
Over the three registration per-
iods, the School of Music receives
about 200 requests for applied
music study from non-music ma-
jors. However, this figure is un-
reliable in that many students
know that they cannot be ac-
commodated and so do not ask.
68 More Students
"We can literally feel an in-
crease of 12 students in space and
staff problems, and 68 more stu-
dents came in this fall." Dean
Wallace pointed out. "We have
13 buildings, and we are running
four of them from 7 a.m. to 10
p.m. seven days a week.
"Many students who come to
the University as freshmen are not
sure of their major.
"Nevertheless, many need musi-
cal training to serve them later
in life, for example, the medical
student who wants to keep his
skill going for the relaxatin it
will later provide," Dean Wallace
explained.
The solution would necessarily
involve expansion of facilities for
adequate studios, practice rooms
and nore instruments and staff
members.

Worthington
To Counsel
For Corps
Paul Worthington, Peace Corps
field representative, will be avail-
able for individual consultation
about volunteer opportunities un-
till noon today in Rm. 3510 Stu-
dent Activities Building.
Tonight at 7:30 p.m. he will
speak at the Guild House on Peace
Corps philosophy, purpose, selec-
tion, training and testing. The
six hour examination for prospec-
tive volunteers will be held Nov.
28 and 29 at 8:30 a.m. at the Ann
Arbor Civil Service Examining
Center, Worthington announced
yesterday.
Although it is not necessary for
taking the examination, the first
step in selection is the applica-
tion, he said. Questionnaires can
be picked up from Vice-President
for Student Affairs James A.
Lewis or at the Post Office. To as-
sure E. reservation at the examin-
ing center the application must
be cleared through the Corp's
Washington office.
Although volunteers are needed
in all fields, more are needed in
the areas of engineering, teaching,
medicine, agriculture and science,
he said
Doctors, nurses, technicians,
English teachers and mechanical
engineers are specific skills in de-
mand.
Slobodkin To View
Children's Books
Author and sculptor Louis Slob-
odkin will lecture on "Creating
Children's Books" at 4:15 p.m.
today in the Multipurpose Rm.
of the Undergraduate Library.

Ap ON

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and
The Brown Jug Restaurant
PIZZA Free Delivery PIZZA
Pizza delivered free in hot portable ovens.
Real Italian food is our specialty.
Cottage Inn 3-5902 Brown Jug 8-9819
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5

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'-. '"I

ANN ARBOR SKI CLUB
presents IN PERSON
WARREN MILLER
with his Magnificent COLOR FILM
"MANY MOODS OF SKIING"
TONIGHT: Tues., Nov. 21st at 8 P.M.
Ann Arbor High School $1.00
Exceptional Color Photography, comedy,
ZURS, STANTON, Sun Valley, etc
A PICTURE FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY

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Dec. 12th at 8:30 PJ

M.

TYRONE GUTHRIE'S
PRODUCTION DIRECT FROM .
THE STRATFORD FESTIVAL OF CANADA
"A SMASH SHOW-A HOWLINGSUCCESSL'
-Tront6 eer 4.a,
GIL$ERT and SULLIVAN'S
RATES of NZANCE"
COMPANY OF SO WiM ORCHESTRA

r

The critical acclaim has
unanimously ecstatic
"Very model of delight,
polished to perfection..
The applause that shook
Auditorium was absolute
deafening."
-Memphis Com. A
"The Policemen's Chorus
incidentally, was alone w
the price of admission. I
Sir Guthrie may have cal
Mack Sennett as consult
The orchestra was magn
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the
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PROGRAMS
by
BUD-MOR

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DAILY OFFICIAL BU LLETIN .

,,I

"Bright, fresh and wonderfully
funny .. surely the brightest
and best musical show to
.play Atlanta in many seasons."
-Atlanta Journal
"A real treasure chest of
wacky, delicious fun, lovely
sets and girls, gorgeous voices,
and brilliant direction."
-Atlanta Constitution

"We carry a complete line
of HARDING programs"
NOW ON THE SCREENI
The most acclaimed ballet of all time
performed in its entirety by the
BOLSHOI BALLFT
TSCMIKOWSKr
In avish Eastman COLOR
starring
MAYA PLISETSIAYA & NOLAI FADEYECHEY
Dishtributd by COLUMBIA PICTURES
ONE NIGHT ONLY
2 PERFORMANCES 7 & 9 P.M.
WED., NOV. 22nd
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906 N. Saginaw 0 Flint

Mail Orders Accepted
Main Floor
$3.50 and $3.00
BALCONY
$3.00 - $2.50 - $2.00
Enclose Self-addressed
Envelope with check

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m., two days preceding
publication.
Tuesday, November 21
General Notices
Regents' Meeting: Fri., Dec. 15. Com-
munications for consideration at this
meeting must be in the President's
hands not later than Dec. 5. Please
submit twenty-one copies of each com-
munication.
The Final Installment payment for
Fall Semester fees is due and payable
at the Cashier's Office, on or before
November 29.
The Univel.rcer Libraries will be
closed Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 23. Li-
braries will also be closed Sat. and
Sun., Nov. 25 and 26.
The General Library and the Under-
graduate Library will close Wed., Nov.
22, at 5 p.m., as will many of the divi-
sional libraries. The General Library
and the Undergraduate Library will
be open on Fri., Nov. 24, from 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. The Map Room will remain
closed on Friday.
Most divisional libraries will be open
on short schedules Fri., Nov. 24. The
Thanksgiving recess hours for each li-
brary will be posted on the library
doors.
February Teacher's Certificate Can-
didates: All requiremtnts for the teach-
er's certificate should be completed by
December first. These requirements in-
clude the teacher's oath, the health
statement, and the Bureau of Ap-
pointments material. The oath should
be takentas soon as possible in 1203
University High School from 8-12 and
1-5.
Foreign Visitors
Following are the foreign visitors who
will be on the campus this week on the
dates indicated.
Program arrangements are being
made by the International Center: Mrs.
Clifford R. Miller.
Mr. Takuichi Ito, Information Spe-
cialist, U.S.I.S. Tokyo, Japan, Nov. 21.
Mr. Ali Sarjadi, Deputy Director,

Dept. of Public Statistics,q (Gov't of
Iran), Teheran, Iran, Nov. 21-Nov. 22.
Mr. Oscar V. Covarrubias, Chief Sta-
tistician, Bureau of the Census and
Statistics, Gov't of the Philippines,
Philippines, Nov. 21-Nov. 22.
Mr. Jesus S. Fernandez, Statistician,
Bureau of the Census & Statistics, Gov't
of the Philippines, Philippines, Nov.
21-Nov. 22.
Mr. Florencio Millare, Statistician,
Bureou of the Census & Statistics,
Gov't of the Philippines, Philippines,
Nov. 21-Nov. 22.
Mr. Yasar Yaser, Student, Vander-
bilt Univ., Turkey, Nov. 21-22.
Mr. Alev G. Dickson, (accompanied
by Mrs. Dickson) Director, Voluntary
Service Overseas, The Royal Common-
wealth Society, London, England, Nov.
27-Nov. 29.
Mrs. Victoria Mandara, Headmistress,
Mpwapwa Girl's Middle School, Mpwa-
pwa, Tanganyika, Nov. 27-Nov. 30.
Events Tuesday
Concert: Galina Vishnevskaya, lead-
ing soprano of Moscow's Bolshoi Opera,
will he presented in recital at 8:30
p.m. in Hill Aud. Her program in-
cludes songs by Bach, Moussorgsky,
Levitin, Miakovsky and Rachmanin-
off; and operatic arias from Beethoven's
"Fidelio"; and Verdi's "Aida" and "La
Forza del Destino.".
Tickets are on sale at the offices
of the University Musical Society In
Burton Tower during the day; and
will be on sale at the Hill Aud. box
office after 7:00 p.m.
Mathematics Colloquium: Dr. G. W.
Hedstrom, University of Michigan, will
speak on "The zeros of the partial sums
of certain small entire functions," on
Tues., Nov. 21, at 4 p.m. in 3209 Angell
Hall.
Refreshments at 3:30 p.m. in 3212
Angell Hall.
Events Wednesday
Mechanical Engineering Seminar: Dr.
Takeo Yokobori, Prof. of Mechanical
Engineering, Tohoku University, Sen-

dai, Japan, will discuss "Strength, Fa-I
tigue, and Fracture, a Perspective ofi
Current Research" on Wed., Nov. 22 atc
4 p.m. in 229 West Engineering Bldg.E
Coffee in the faculty lounge at 3:30
p.m. All graduate students and facul-c
ty invited.1
Approval for the following studentI
sponsored activities becomes effective
twenty-four (24) hours after the publi-r
cation of this notice. All publicity for
these events must be withheld until
the approval has become effective. E
Dec. 7-Michigan Union, Panel dis-
cussion on Food Production, Union 3
RS, 4:15 p.m.
Mar. 3-Dental Class of 1963, Odonto
Bail, Union Ballroom, 9-1 p.m.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
The Atlantic Refining Company, Pe-
troleum Products, Philadelphia, Pa.-
IG M. 1,
DIAL NO 5-6290
ENDING WEDNESDAY
Two Encore Hits!
as T11 . MAN
TN THE!A
W"HU I SUIT
AND
KIND HEARTS 1
ND CORONETS

Positions for 5 men in Economic Eval-
uation Section of Research & Devel-
opment Dept. Work includes project
appraisal, economic evaluation & pro-
gram planning. Degree in Chem. Engrg.
or Chem. & advanced degree ir, Bus.
Ad. Also position as Corrosion Engnr.
for grad with MS in Chem. Engrg. with
Metallurgical Engrg. minor & 2-10 yrs.
In process industries as Corrosion or
Materials Engnr.
Hotpoint, Div. of General Electric
Co., Chicago, 1i.-Pollowing positions
are available: Industrial Designer;
(Continued on Page 4)
DIAL NO 5-69.
Ending Wednesday
rThestry owhat
footmendidtoa
gira..tndwh the
towndidtothemt
:: rrKIRK
Y~,.DOUGLA
in,
WTHOUT
SThanksgiving Day '
ELVIS PRESLEY
in
"BLUE HAWAIIl"

discount: records,lo
P*ee- Chrid tma4
~2eciaI4!
NOV. 20 THROUGH DEC. 2

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"

List
MITCH MILLER-Holiday Sing Along .. 3.98
SOUND OF MUSIC-Broadway Cast .... 5.98
RUSTY WARREN-Knockers Up... .4.98
JUDY GARLAND at Carnegie Hall ......9.96
BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S, Sound Track 3.98
TWIST with Chubby Checker'..........3.98
Stereo Slightly Higher
PLUS

SALE
2.89
4.79
3.89
7.96
2.89
2.89

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NOW

SHOWS at 1:30 - 2:50
4:55 - 7:00 and 9:10
FEATURE STARTS
10 MINUTES LATER

MERCUUYKCMMAND
BACH GUILD and TIME
At DEALER'S COST

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COLOR by DE LUXE

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{ _.___ __

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SPACE, MISSILE & JET PROJECTS
AT DOUGLAS
have created outstanding
career opportunities for
SCIENTISTS and ENGINEERS
with or working on advanced degrees
Assignments include the following areas:

4

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The Dramatic Arts Center presents:

i

Servo-Mechanisms- relating to
all types of control problems
Electronic Systems-relating to
all types of guidance, detection,
control and communications
Propulsion--relating to fluid.
mechanics, thermodynamics,
dynamics, internal aerodynamics
Environmental -relating to air
conditioning, pressurization and
oxygen systems
Human Factors-analysis of
environment affecting pilot and
space crews, design of cockpit con-
soles, instrument panels and pilot
equipment

Heat Transfer-relating to mis-
sile and space vehicle structures
Structures-relating to cyclic.
loads, temperature effects, and the
investigation of new materials,
methods, products, etc.
Aerodynamics-relating to wind
tunnel, research, stability and
control,
Solid State Physics-relating to
metal surfaces and fatigue
Space vehicle and weapon
system studies-of all types,
involving a vast range of scientific
and engineering skills

DELUXE GIFT SETS
List SALE
TCF 101-2 TOMMY DORSEY Orchestra ... 7.96 1.99
F.D.R. SPEAKS-6 LPs-Collected Speeches 29.95 16.95
THE PERFECT GIFT
HANDEL: MESSIAH
XWL 3306-VIENNA STATE OPERA
Orchestra and Chorus conducted by Scherchen
list 15.00
Stereo Slightly Higher N0W 8.99
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ON VANGUARD ALL
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4

The

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