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September 12, 1961 - Image 47

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Musical Society Schedules

(Continued from Page 1)

grew
size.

from about 100 to its present]

By RUTH EVENHUIS
The Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
maintains a prograrti of five or six
full-scale productions per year as
well as frequent one-act plays and
dramatic workshops.
The 31 year old theatre is one
of the oldest cultural, organiza-
tions in-the state, according to its
president, Zeke Jabbour.
Last year it produced "Darkness
at Noon," "Bell, Book and Candle,"
"Joan of Lorraine," "The Flower-
ing Peach,",and "Our Town." This
summer the group flas. worked
with the- Green Acres Farm Sum-
mer Theatre School in Chelsea on
one-at plays. The 'playbill for
net year has not yet been deter-
mined, Jabbour said.
Shakespeare to Shaw
Its repertoire has been plays
from Shakespeare to George Ber-
nard"Shaw's "Major Barbara" In
the past, it has produced several
Tennessee Williams plays, "The
Death of a Salesman," and "The
Caine Mutiny Court Martial"
among many others.
Membership in the Civic Thea-
tre is open to anyone. for $1.50.
Performances have taken place
in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
since 1950."Prior to that, the group
gave three annual performances
in Slauson Junior High School
y Self-Sufficient
The Civic Theatre is now a self-
sufficient civic organization,' no
longer relying on endowments for
support.
Jabbour, issued a special we-
come to University students inter-
eeted in participating in the Thea-
tre's productions. Auditions are
held regularly for the plays pre-
sented, and rehearsals are can-
ducted on weekday evenings.
More than 200 people of "town
and gown" are active in the
theatre's productions per, year,
Jabbour said. He also mentioned
that there is fine cooperation be-
tween the Civic Theatre and the
University speech department. Al-
though the majority of the parti-
cipants are Ann Arbor residents,
Jabbour said that many students
and faculty members are also in-
volved.
- Four Directors
Last January Jerry Sandler,
William Taylor, Ted Heusel and
Clarence Stephenson directed the
plays. However, Jabbour said that
the list varies from year to year.
The.group hopes that this year
will see the construction of a
PUBLISHED
FOUR TIMES A YEAR
9

workshop building in which to
carry on the affairs of the theatre.
They have negotiated with the
city on the purchase of almost an
acre of land in Virginia Park be-
between 'Liberty and Fair Streets
on which to construct a cement
block building.
The plans for a the new build-
ing include a general meeting and
rehearsal room and a scene shop.
They hope to complete the build-
ing by fall, Jabbour said.
Permanent Theatre
Jabbour emphasized Ann Ar-
bor's need for a "permanent, pro-
fessional repertory theatre. Ul-
timately," he said, "I think we
will get one because the determi-
nation is very much there."
He said that such- a theatre
would not hurt the interest in non-
professional - theatre since people
who enjoy the performances of
one theatre are likely to attend
another.
Try FOLLE
USEDLIE
at BARGAI
New Books If
STATE STREET at N

In addition to the annual Mes-;
siah, the group has presented
operas in concert form and a num-
ber of great oratorios. It has an-'
nually sung, with the Philadelphia9
Orchestra during the May festival.
For the Messiah performance, a
special orchestra is formed.
Expanids Potential
The modifications of Hill Aud.'
will expand even more the poten-
tial of an organization that has
brought a sizable portion of the'
world's finest musical artists to
Ann Arbor.
Gail Rector, director of the So-
ciety, feels that more students
ought to be aware of the group's
singular history.
He once said, "Since the con-1
certs are not required programs,E
it falls upon the individual to be
receptive to presentations by the2
world's greatest artists."
The choral union series will be-
gin Oct. 4 with Metropolitan
Opera bass George London. Two
weeks later, the Roger Wagner
Chorale will perform.
Boston Symphony
The Boston Symphony orches-
tra, long a feature of the series,
will play Oct. 22 at 2:30 p.m. This
will be the second of two con-
certs presented by the group on
Homecoming weekend.
The first, a special concert, will
be Oct. 21. Charles Munch will
conduct both concerts.
The Berlin Philharmonic, which
will tour the United States with
its conductor Herbert Von Kara-
jan, will play at the University
Nov. 3.
A Philippine song and dance
company, Bayanhin, one of the
groups to take advantage of the
auditorium's curtain and new
lighting techniques, will be here
three days later.
Noted violinist Yehudi Menuhin
will play an afternoon concert on
Nov. 12.
* Soviet Soprano
Soviet soprano Galina Vishnev-
skaya of the Bolshoi Opera, will
make her first appearance at the
University Nov. 21.
Another Soviet artist giving his
first University performance will
TT'S First
11OOKS
N.PRICES
You Prefer
ORTH UNIVERSITY

-'--ed pianist Emil Gilels onj
Feb. 13.
" er first for the concert
series will be the afternoon con-
cert of the Minneapolis Symphony
Orchestra with its new conductor,
Stanislaw Skrowaczewski on March
4.
The series will be completed with
a performance of the American
Ballet Theatre March 24.
The Musical Society will also
present five concerts as its extra
concert series.
Polish Group
A Polish song and dance group
of 100, will make first use of the
pit facilities on Oct. 24.
George Szell will conduct theI
Ceveland Symphony' orchestra in
its Nov. 16 performance at the
University.
Arthur Fiedler will lead the
Boston Pops Tour Orchestra in
an afternoon concert Feb. 18.
Finishing the series will be Met-
ropolitan Opera star soprano Leon-
tyne Price, March 12. -
Another feature of the concert
season will be the return of the
Philadelphia orchestra for the
69th annual May Festival. Soloists
yet to be announced, the festival

will consist of six concerts by the
Philadelphia group, some of them
conducted by the regular con-
ductor Eugene Ormandy with
guest artists wielding the baton
for the remainder.
Another annual University pres-
entation will be two performances
of the Messiah Dec. 2 and 3. The
Dec. 3 concert will be in the
afternoon.
Soloists soprano Ilona Kom-
brink, contralto Lili Chookasian,
tenor Richard Miller, bass Ara
Berberian and organist Mary Mc-
Call Stubbins will join forces with
the Choral Union chorus and the
University Symphony Orchestra
under the direction of Lester Mc-
Coy for the annual presentation
of this Handel Oratorio.
There will also be a Chamber
Music Festival. The New York Pro
Musica will start the festival with
an afternoon performance on Oct.
29. Another of the chamber con-
certs will be classical folk-singer
Richard Dyer Benett, Jan. 13.
There will also be three suc-
cessive concerts in this series, Feb.
23, 24 and 25 featuring the Jul-
liard String Quartet, the Eger
Players, and the Beaux Arts Trio.

STRING QUARTET-The University Musical Society has succeeded in bringing to the campus some
of the world's outstanding artists. Last season was no exception as the program included the
Budapest String Quartet.

t

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