100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 12, 1961 - Image 46

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MIC11IGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1961

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 12,1981

CHUCK WAGON
LUNCHES and DINNERS
FINE SALADS and SANDWICHES
Specializing in Roost Beef
Serving Wines and Beers from all over the world
QUICK LUNCH SERVICE
recommended by Duncan Hines and Gourmet
CATERING SERVICE AVAILABLE
OPEN 7 DAYS

ELIMINATES COMMITTEES:
SGC Reorganizes Ad Wing

VARIED FACILITIES:
Culture, Recreation
Among City's Assets

Excitement
Stirs Crowd
In Hyde Park
(continued from Page 1)

ii

I

2045 Packard Hours 11 A.M.-9 P.M.
LARRY DAVIS, Proprietor

NO 2-1661

By SHARON MUSKOVITZ
Invariably the first thing that
comes to mind when the city of
Ann Arbor is mentioned is the
University of Michigan.
One seems to go along with the
other. Ann Arbor does create an
atmosphere of a college town buti
its use does not end here. It also
has many cultural and recreation-
al advantages completely separ-
ated from the University.
Its various community spon-
sored events cover all fields of the
Arts.
The Ann Arbor Civic Symphony
Orchestra and Band receive rec-
ognition as excellent groups. The
city is equally represented in the
field of the dance with its Civic
Ballet.
Presenting five productions a
year is the Civic Theatre, a drama
group recognized for outstanding
performances.
The artists work is recognized
by the Ann Arbor Art Association

forsythe Galle ry
'201 Nickels Arcade - NOrmandy 3-0918

while the Potters' Guild focuses
its attention on ceramics.
Ann Arbor also has its share of
recreational facilities with various
events open during the year. There-
is a twelve month recreation pro-
gram provided jointly by the city
and the public schools.
This program includes ice ski t-
ing in the winter months and an
eight week summer program in 16
different locations throughout the
city.
There are a large number of
community s p o n s o r e d softball
leagues. Besides these the golf and
swimming areas are always well
populated.
Within a 30-mile radius of Ann
Arbor there are six State Parks
and four State Recreation areas
providing swimming, fishing, boat-
ing, camping, and an abundance of
scenic hills and lakes. Picnicking
and hiking are favorites in these
areas.
There are also recreation facili-
ties along the valleys of the Huron
and Clinton Rivers.
As a city alone, Ann Arbor of-
fers many opportunities for rec-
reational and cultural outlets that
are not connected with the Uni-
versity and added to the campus
programs contribute to making the
area one of the most abundant in
community activities offerings.

To join in the discussions, all
one needs is a ready opinion and
a loud voice. In the past, as many
as four speakers have simultane-
ously attracted segments of the
Diag. audience, and vocal vying for
attention is common.
Past Hyde Parks have serenely
begun with posters announcing
the time and place, then reached
high points during the heated
debates among bench perchers.
The semester's chairman of
Hyde Park does not have to be
directly connected with the
Leaguer the chairman need only
to be someone who is interested in
the idea, willing to give it the
needed publicity for a diverse au-
dience and capable of making sure
that someone will get the discus-
|sion going by being the first
speaker.
This is not as easy as it seems
for students seem to need a small
push at times. Once the spark is
provided, however, arguments and
heated debates are not unusual.
On occasion, two students have
advanced opposite ideas on the
same subject at the same time,
vying for the attention of the
fluctuating audience--the result
more like a ping pong game than
anything else.

11

Contemporary Art

CANDIDATE OPEN HOUSE-During the hectic final week of campaigning, candidates schedule
speaking engagements at the, various residences to present their platform and personality to the
prospective voters.

Come In and Browse!

l

, I

DIAMONDS
HALLE R9 S

WATCHES

flewe/er.
TO THE STUDENTS OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

103 Years:

1858 to

1961

(Continued from Page 1) C
were unwitting Communist-led
dupes. SGC members object to the
distortions and implications of the
film.
The Council showed "Operation
Abolition" twice on campus last
year. At the second showing, Ful-
ton Lewis III, who narrated the
film and toured the country
speaking in behalf of it, debated
the issues raised by SGC with
Council member Roger Season-
wein, '6L
Supports 'Riders'
The Council also sent letters to
Attorney General Robert Kenne-
dy, Alabama Gov. John Patterson,
and Rev. Martin Luther King in
support of the "Freedom Rides"
to Alabama.
The letters contained expres-
sions of Council sympathy and
support for those participating in
the non-violent Freedom Rides
and with the "principles of non-
violence which motivate these rid-
ers and many other courageous
Southerners attempting to work
for integration in the South."
On campus issues, SGC consid-
ered a motion to express "grave
concern" over an apparent trend
of irresponsibility in The Daily.
Substitute Motion
A substitute motion was passed
as a result of which all the SGC
members attended a meeting with
the Daily junior and senior staffs.
Staff members explained Daily
procedure and answered questions
raised by Council members.
The Council discussed and will

-

vote this fall on a motion regard-
ing confidential reports on stu-
dents in the quadrangles.
The reports, known as "pink
slips" are made out by the quad
educational staff, are submitted
to the Dean of Men's Office and
become a part of a student's per-
manent record.
They are used by quad staff
members and their contents are
sometimes summarized for poten-
tial employers requesting refer-
ences.
Staff Comments
They ask for comment on study
habits, motivation and other mis-
cellaneous remarks including an
evaluation as "excellent," "aver-
age" or "poor" of the student's
personal appearance, roommate
adjustment, health and courtesy.
The report concludes with rec-
ommendation that the student be
approved, conditionally approved
or disapproved for readmittance
to the quad system.
In cases where the student is
disapproved or approved condi-
tionally, he must be notified of
the recommendation and told of
the reasons for it.
At the last SGC meeting, Coun-
cil members voted to consider the
motion, which recommends that
the existence and nature of the
pink slips be made public, in the
fall. Further discussion may in-
clude similar reports made out for
women in the residence hall sys-
tem.
A major undertaking of the
Council last semester was reor-

ganization of the administrative
wing. The new council structure
contains three committees.
New Committee
The Committee on Student Ac-
tivities contains nine voting mem-
bers, five Council members and
five students who do not belong
to the council.
Among the functions of the
Committee are advising the Coun-
cil on recognition of new cam-
pus organizations and advising the
Council on any dangers in recog-
nition status of existing organiza-
tions, advising the Council on
changes in University regulations
for student organizations, receiv-
ing reports from existing organi-
zations concerned with student or-
ganizations and preparing a cal-
endar of student activities at the
end of each year.
The Committee on Student
Concerns advises the Council on
expression of student opinion and
promotes such programs as meet
specific student concerns.
Recommend Students
The Committee on the Univer-
sity recommends on appointments
of students to University commit-
tees, hears reports from student
representatives of University and
other committees and promotes
such programs as deal with the
University in general.
In addition, SGC will recruit
and maintain a research pool con-
sisting of students who come into
the organization through the ori-
entation program in the fall and
the spring.

Students Aid,
'U' Alumni
Helping to promote the Univer-
sity to prospective freshmen and
informing interested alumni are
two of the vital functions of the
Student Governors.
The group is composed of ap-
proximately 122 students, but
there is no limit to its member-
ship.
All governors are appointed by
their hometown alumni clubs and
serve as official liaisons with them.
Some smaller cities have only one
student representing their group,
but larger clubs may have as many
as three.
The student governors work un-
der the auspices of the Alumni
Association, a national organiza-
tion of all University alumni
groups. The association and the
governors do not use University
facilities or staff for their work;
they are financially independent
and work without remuneration
promoting the University.
The governors make trips to
alumni meetings to explain the
"new look" at the University and
to clear up any questions which
the graduates have. They also
speak to prospective enrollees to
encourage them to come to the
University. The group is divided
into five committees concerned
with information on admissions,
housing and scholarships, select-
ing new governors and newspaper
publicity.
Any interested students may.ap-
ply for status as a "gdvernor and
will be admitted to the program
if approved' by his alumni club.

,..

4

We welcome the Old Students and
invite the New Students to our store,
located just North of Main Campus.

717 N. University

- near Hill Auditorium

COLLEGE JEWELRY
WATCH REPAIRING

JEWELRY

1
r

4q

SPECIAL RATES for
COLLEGE STUDENTS.
TIME $3.87 yr. 5 $7.00 2 yrs. 5
LIFE $4.00 yr. 5 $7.00 2yrs.O
SPORTS ILLUSTRATED $4.00 yr. Q $7.50 2 yrs. Q
NEWSWEEK $3.00 yr. 5$6.00 2 yrs. Q
ARCHITECTURAL FORUM $3.25 yr. 5

I BEG YOUR PARDON!-There always seems to be a difference of
opinion at Hyde Park and spectators do not hesitate to interrupt
the speaker with their comments. Like the original London forum
of discussion, there 'are no scheduled speakers and anyone who
can grab a bench may orate to his heart's content.

I

CAMPUS BIKE & TOY
BEST IN VALUE--BEST IN PRICE

I

FORTUNE $7.50 yr. Q
HOUSE AND HOME $4.50 yr.

SEND NO
MONEY
NOW

Publisher will bill you later.
High school graduating seniors eligible.
Special rates extended to educators and clergy.
ENCLOSE CHECK OR MONEY ORDER
FOR THE FOLLOWING:
AMERICAN HOME $2.25 9 mos. Q
ATLANTIC MONTHLY $3.00 8 mos. EQ
CORONET $1.00 7 mos. E] $2.00 14 mos. Q
ESQUIRE $6.00 yr. [ $10.00 2 yrs. Q
HOLIDAY $3.75 15 mos. Q $7.50 30 mos. Q
JACK AND JILL $2.95 9 mos. Q
LADIES' HOME JOURNAL $3.00 yr. Q $5.50 2 yrs. Ql
LOOK $4.00 yr. ,l $7.50 2 yrs. p $17.00 5 yrs. Ql
NEW YORKER $3.00 8 mos.
NEW YORK TIMES $22.50 yr. daily Q $22 yr. Sun. El
$44.50 yr. daily and Sun. El
OUTDOOR LIFE $3.33 23 mos. EQ
PARENTS $3.00 18 mos. Ql
PLAYBOY $5.00 yr. Q $9.00 2 yrs. El
READER'S DIGEST $2.00 yr. E
REPORTER $3.27 10 mos. (20 issues) 5
SATURDAY EVENING POST $2.99 39 wks. El
$4.95 65 wks. Q
SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN $6.00 yr. Q $11.00 2 yrs. p
$15.00 3 yrs. Q
TV GUIDE $2.88 34 wks. Q $5.85 66 wks. 5
U.S. NEWS and WORLD REPORT $3.67 39 wks. Q
0 Over 2,000 other selections available. Call NO 2-3061
or fill out and return the order blank below
,.............rrwaai.....r.........ir.r....... ;
I STUDENT PERIODICAL AGENCY
Box 1161, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Please send me the above checked xQ subscriptions.
I

I

LIGHTWEIGHT
ADULT SIZE
BUDGET TERMS
TO STUDENTS

I.

495

SPECIAL

BUY IN ANN ARBOR

BUY YOUR
SERVICED.
AVAILABLE

BICYCLE WHERE IT CAN BE
REMEMBER, PARTS ARE NOT
FOR MANY IMPORTED MODELS.

SAVE ON SHIPPING ' AND ASSEMBLING
CHARGE. AVOID SHIPPING DAMAGES AND
DELAYS.
BUY WHERE POST - PURCHASE ADJUST-
MENTS ARE FREE!
BUY AT CAMPUS BIKE

200 BICYCLES
ROYCE-UNION-SCHWINN-RALEIGH
ROBIN HOOD-EVANS
ACCESSORIES
SADDLE BASKETS - WICKER BASKETS -
9 SPEED GEARS - SPEEDOMETERS - BIKE
COVERS - WAX - CHAIN LOCKS -
SPRING CARRIERS - SADDLE BAGS - GEN-
ERATOR SETS - BATTERY LAMPS - ELEC-
TRIC HORNS - SEAT COVERS - TIRE
PUMPS - Olt - MIRRORS.

I

HOBBY
SUPPLIES

TOYS
GAMES

SPORTS
Equipment
USED
BICYCLES

KEYS
MADE

BIKE
STORAGE

BICYCLES
SHIPPED
ANYWHERE

REPAIR
SHOP

1

mm

I

I

III

l

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan