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November 16, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
BY HALF: ROTC Finds Cadets Show Prints
ign Student Gains Cited Alert, Career Minded For Holiday

group that is 60 per cent en-
gineers."
Lt. Col. Dwight E. Durner, chief
of Air Force ROTC, related that
the Air Science Department had
dropped the requirement that ca-
dets remain in the program for
two years to let the cadet be sure
he likes the program before he
is obligated. As a result more and
higher quality men are retained.'
"A graduate from the Univer-
sity's Air Force program has never
flunked his officers' examinations,
and we hope, never will," he said.
327 Army Cadets
In the Army program the larg-
est of the three groups with 327
cadets, compared to the Navy's
275 and the Air Force' 255, the
only "complaint" is that the de-
tachment is too small.
One problem which plagues the
services is the retention rate, the
proportion of the graduated men
who remain in the military service
after their alloted time. At pres-
ent the terms are four years re-
serve and two years active duty
for the Army, four years active
and two reserve for the Navy, and
four years and two years reserve
for the Air Force, with an added
year of active service for flyers.
In no service is this rate as
high as fifty per cent and since
the services haveydifficulties re-
taining even forty per cent of
their freshmen until graduation,
there is a lack of college gradu-
ates to work in the newer, more
specialized armed forces.
Lower Requirements
In order to raise the number
of qualified /personnel, many of
the physical requirements are be-
ing lowered, since a man with
glasses or asthma or an ear defect,
can push a button, write out a
form, or handle test tubes as well
as a man with 20-20 vision, perfect
health, and unimpaired physical
characteristics.
Lipset To Speak,
On Democracies
Prof. Seymour M. Lipset of the
University of California at Berke-
ley will speak on "A Comparative
Analysis of the English-Speaking
Democracies" at a sociology col-
loquium at 4:15 p.m. today in
Aud. B.

Christmas prints available for
purchase are on display in the
Museum of Art in the Alumni
Hall from 9 a.m. to noon daily
until Dec. 13.
The prints include manuscripts,
fifteenth and sixteenth woodcuts
for blockbooks, Chinese prints,
Italian, Dutch, French and Ger-
man masters of the sixteenth and
seventeenth century.
Prints by Piranesi, Goya, Dau-
mier, Bonnard, Marquet, Leger,
Chagall, Rouault, Barlach, Koll-
witz, Derain, Maillol, Matisse, Pi-
casso and Wols are available.
JGP To Hold
Mass Meetintg
Junior Girls Play committees
will hold a mass meeting at 7
p.m. today in the Henderson Rm.
of the League. A synopsis of the
play to be presented next Mar.
29-3 1 will be presented.
Shot Deadline Set
By Health Service
Today is the last day anti-flu
shots will be administered, Health
Service has announced. The shots
will be given from 8:30 a.m. to
noon and from 1-4:30 p.m.
Wash tenaw.Group
To Hold Panel
The Washtenaw County School
Officers Association will sponsor
a public panel discussion on the
constitutional convention and edu-
cation at 8 p.m. today in the
County Bldg.
MUSKET presents
HO.

"THE SANDBOX"
by
EDWARD ALBEE

4:10 Arena Theatre
Frieze Building
TODAY

Admission Free

ALL-CAMPUS REGIONAL DISCUSSION
"POLITICAL OBJECTIVES
IN SOUTHEASt ASIA"
Panel of students from

INDONESIA
PHILIPPINES

VIETNAM
UNITEb STATES

moderated by PROF. E. B. AYAL, Economics
plus audience participation

Thurs., Nov. 16

730-9:30 P.M.

4

Multipurpose Roomof the UGLI
Sponsored by the International Students Association

ii

it

TRADITIONAL

THANKSGIVING DINNER
$2.75

A NEW MUSICAL
PREMIERE
Nov. 29, 30
Dec. 1 &'2 at 8:30 P.M.
Saturday Matinee 2:30

Children's Portion (age 10
$2.00

or under)

Thursday, November 23
12:30-3:00 P.M.

FLOWERS
from
BUD-MOR

Also other entrees at regular prices
For Reservations Dial 662-4431

NO 2-6362

I

TICKETS ON
UNION AND

SALE
DIAG

J

I

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Cinena quild

l.t

pf

presents

I

Thursday and Friday:
Cry the Beloved Country
(7:00 and 9:00)
Saturday and Sunday:
Gorky Trilogy, II:
MY UNIVERSITIES
(7:00 and 9:00)

I

IUI0I N

i

1

This week some member
nations proposed that South
Africa be ousted from the
United Nations because of its
racist policies. The motion did
not carry. Obviously the prob-
lem which Alan Paton drama-
tized in his novel (1948) and in
his script for the movie (1951)
is still with us.
Cry the Beloved Country is
the story of two fathers, one
black, one white, whose sons are
the sacrificial victims of an im-
possible social system. Rev.
Stephen Kumalo has come to
Johannesburg to seek his sister
and his son - both of whom
have left their small village in
the Nepal valley to improve
their lots. The old man, though
at first cheated and bewildered
by the metropolis, finds help in
the form of a young, angry, city
priest (Sidney Piotier). To-
gether they begin a search
which turns up a shantytown
prostitute, and a murderer.
The other father, a prosperous
white farmer, is brought to the
city by the violent death of his
son-the effective and peaceful
leader of the fight to improve
Negro conditions in Johannes-

fied and direct Kumolo ... does
the best work of his career. (It
is) a performance of rare sta-
ture, at once appealing and in-
spiring."
Those who have seen the film
will recall that Charles Carson's
bereaved father struggling with
bitterness is a classic example
of how a restrained interprets-
tion can produce emotions
which are not only more life-
like, but are infinitely more
overpowering than those pro-
duced by actors who let their
tears flow and their arms flag
wildly about. Like Lee, he cre-
ates an unforgettable character.
This week Cinema Guild is
showing the last of the films
from the award winning Gorky
Trilogy-My Universities. Like
My Wanderings, My Universi-
ties is built on what has gone
before, but is made to be com-
plete in itself.
Those who have been fortu-
nate enough to have seen Parts
I and II have already experi-
enced the cumulative effect. My
Wanderings was the richer for
our having met Gorky the child,
his urm- andsunperstitious

11

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