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November 10, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-11-10

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FRIDAT, NOVEMBER 10, 1961

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE {

THE MiCHIGAN DAIIV PAC~U

,icavr. ,az aLc

Louw Defends Policy,
Raps Possible Removal

Complete Catalog

Says Move
Would Hurt
World Body
Nations Ask Break
With South Africa
UNITED NATIONS (M)-Fight-
ing a lone battle in defense of
white supremacy laws, South Af-
rica's Foreign Minister Eric Louw
said yesterday expulsion of his
country from the United Nations
would be "the beginning of the
end" of the organization.
The Foreign Minister spoke at
the end of debate on apartheid in
the Assembly's special political
committee. He countered personal
attacks on him and his country
with bitter denunciations of Gha-
na's President Kwame Nkrumah
and of delegates of African count
tries seeking to punish South Af-
rica with drastic boycotts and
possible expulsion.
Louw included the United States
in his counterattack, based on his
contention that South Africa's ac-
cusers did not come into the UN
with clean hands on the issue of
race discrimination.
Ask Break
Thirty-one African and Asian
countries are asking the UN to
break off diplomatic and trade
relations with South Africa as a
first step in forcing it to drop its
white supremacy laws affecting 14
million nonwhites.
As a second step they want the
General Assembly to ask the Se-
curity Council to, consider steps
to expel South Africa.
Ghana and Guinea are among
the countries pressing the meas-
ure. The Soviet bloc supports
them.
Another Appeal
Eight other countries, includ-
ing India, propose only that an
other appeal be made to South
Africa to change its policies. They
suggest as punishment only that
individual countries take any boy-
cott step they deem fit.
Louw told the committee "I
must warn that a very dangerous
precedent will be established if on
the ground of allegations made
in the course of the committee's
discussion, this committee were to
recommend the imposition of
sanctions against South Africa."
"Once precedent has been 'es-
tablished, similar action may and
should be taken against other
member states," he said.
There were good grounds, he
said, for applying penalties against
the Soviet Union.

Cites. Education Needs
By G. K. HODENFIELD
Associated Press Education Writer
BALTIMORE (1')-"If this country would apply the same brain
power and money to the problems of education as it does to agricul-
ture, there would be -a bumper crop of national benefits."
So says Dean Lindley J. Stiles of the University of Wisconsin,
who believes the real frontiers of education have not yet even been
approached. Stiles told the council of chief state school officers Wed-
nesday that properly supported, education can become the same
,/ kind of scientific process that

PARLIAMENT
RECORDS

I

$

98

Tha Officials
List Incidents
BANGKOK (P) - Cambodians
were reported by Thai officials to
be digging trenches and building
small air fields along the Thailand
border yesterday.
Press reports said armed Cam-
bodians, under fighter plane cov-
er, landed and occupied the small
island of Yor, five miles from a
Thailand border village on the
Gulf of Siam Monday.
These were the latest develop-
ments in the row between Neu-
tralist Cambodia and militantly
anti-Communist Thailand. Cam-
bodia broke relations with Thai-
land on Oct. 23. 1
Train Villagers
Gen. Thanom Kittikachorn,
Thai defense minister, told news-
men trenches were being dug at
two places along the 350-mile
frontier of jungle and mountains,
and Cambodian villagers were be-
ing trained in the use of fire-
arms.
Gen. Praphat Carusathien, in-
terior minister, reported the air-
field construction but said there
were no planes at the fields as
far as he knew.
The press reports of the land-
ing on Yor Island in Thailand's
territorial waters have not been
confirmed officially yet. There
was no estimate of the number
of troops involved.
Border Police
So far Thailand has reported
no military precautions in the
area except the strengthening of
border police.
The current break in diplomat-
ic relations followed a statement
in Tokyo by Cambodia's chief of
state, Prince Norodom Sihanouk,
that Thailand and South Viet Nam
were more of a threat to his coun-
try than Communists.
Thailand's premier, Marshal
Sarit Thanarat, in turn charged
that Communists planned to use
Cambodia as a jumpingoff place
for attacks on neighboring coun-
tries.

farming is today.
Urges Spending
The federal government now
spends $160 million a year on agri-
culture research, but only about
$5 million on research in educa-
tion, Stiles said.
He urged the state superintend-
ents and commissioners of edu-
cation, holding their annual three-
day meeting here, to support a
proposal that the federal govern-
ment appropriate $75 million to
$100 million a year for education-
al research and development.
Stiles said later, in an inter-
view, "farmers used to farm ac-
cording to the almanac, folklore,
and trial and error. That is the
way too many of our schools are
educating youngsters today."
Cultivate Mind
Stiles said, "I do not begrudge
the money spent on agricultural
research. The figures prove they
are dollars well spent. But it is
high time we consider the culti-
vation of the mind just as impor-
tant as the cultivation of the
soil."
Money spent for research and
development in education, he said,
would be returned many times
over to the public.
"With proper research," Stiles
said, "we can learn how, through
education, to take a mentally re-
tarded child and lift him to the
point where he is a self-sufficient
member of society. Today, that
same child is kept in an institu-
tion - a tremendous loss and
waste.
Space Race
"The space race with Russia is.
not going to be won by the nation
which can mass the greatest num-
ber of scientists, but by a few cre-
ative geniuses who will make the
break-throughs that will push one
side or the other out in front..
"Research can show us the way
to identify these creative people,
and how to stretch their creative
genius," Stiles added.
U.S. Checks
Berlin Border
BERLIN (o)-The United States
Army yesterday took over from
West Berlin police the job of bor-
der checks on Russian civilians
crossing into West Berlin.
Allied officials said it was the
first time that Americans inspect-
ed identifications of Soviets.
Violence flared on the border
in the British sector last night as
West Berlin said one of their pa-
trols was attacked.

ON THE DOWNSWING-Rioters overturn a light truck in Guay-
aquil, Ecuador near the end of demonstrations against the
Valesco Ibarra government.
Arosemena Takes Oath
As President of Ecuador
QUITO, Ecuador (A")-Leftist President Carlos Julio Arosemena
formally took office yesterday in a peaceful climax to a violent na-
tional crisis touched off by the ousted president's effort to end eco-
nomic woes with higher taxes.
In his first declaration as president, Arosemena defended a sum-
mertime trip he took to the Soviet Union in the role of Ecuadorean
Vice-President and guest of the
Moscow government, and he spoke
out for. friendly relations with >
Cuba.
The former Vice-President suc-
ceeded ousted Jose Maria Velasco
Ibarra with the help of an air ,
force jet fighter foray over Quito '
Wednesday.
Arosemena's succession and his
selection of a mid-road cabinet
appeared to bring a sense of calm
to this nation of 4 million after
weeks of turmoil.'
Arosemena 'pledged a govern-
ment of peace and friendship and
an end to special privileges, and Y
in an apparent response to left-
ist urging for ties with Commu-
nist nations, he said, "I am willing
to establish diplomatic relations
with any country in the world
where there exists mutual de-
sire."

BOOK SALE
Gabriel Richard Center
331 Thompson Street,
Saturday, November11,
9 A.M. -4 P.M.
Read the Classifieds

VACLAV TALICH AND THE
CZECH PHILHARMONIC

Dvorak
Tchaikovsky
Smetana
Dvorak
Dvorak

Symphony No. 5 "New Wo
Symphony No. 6 "Pathetiqt
Ma Vaist (complete)
Slavonic Dances (complete
Cello Concerto

rld"
ue)

CZECH PHILHARMONIC

Prokofiev
Shostakovich
Beethoven
Moussorgsky/Ravel
Debussy
Ravel
Mozart
Rimsky-Korsakov
Khatchaturian
Beethoven
Berlioz
Prokofiev
De Falla " Enesco
Beethoven
Beethoven
Tchaikovsky

Symphony No.7
Symphony No. 7

Symphony No. 6 "Pastorale"
Pictures at an Exhibition
La Mer
Bolero and Rapsodie Espagnole
Violin Concerto No. 4
Bassoon Concerto
Scheherazade
Gayne Suite
Symphony No. 3 "Eroica"
Symphonie "Fantastique"
Romeo and Juliet
El Amor Brujo * Roumanian
Rhapsodies
Symphony No. 5
Piano Concerto No. 5 "Emperor"
Symphony No. 5

Nehru Agrees
With Kennedy
On Berlin Issue
WASHINGTON (R) - India's
Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru
joined President John F. Kennedy
yesterday in concurring on the
"legitimate and necessary right of
access to Berlin."
A joint communique, issued at
the end of four days of talks be-
tween the two leaders, also said
they agreed on the urgent need
for a treaty banning nuclear tests
with necessary provision for in-
spection and control.j
On Southeast Asia, Kennedy
and Nehru declared it is the com-
mon objective of the United States
and India to see that Laos be a
genuinely neutral state, free of
domination by any foreign power.

SVIATOSLAV RICHTER

Tchaikovsky
Rachmaninoff

Piano'Concerto No. 1
Piano Concerto No. 2

DAVID OISTRAKH

Prokofi ev

Love for the Three Oranges

World News Roundup,
By The Associated Press for revealing United States secrets
EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE to Red agents.
--The X15 rocket plane flashed a * * *
record 4,070 miles an hour yes- WASHINGTON-The Agricul-
terday in its long awaited all-out ture Department reported yester-
speed dash--and) landed safely day that crop prospects continued
despite a shattered windshield, to improve during October due to
topping its 4,000 m.p.h. designat- favorable weather.
ed maximum speed. It said the total volume of pro-
Only United States and Russian duction this year is expected to
astronauts in missile-boosted cap- be 117 per cent of the 1947-49
sules have gone faster than Air average compared with last year's
Force Maj. Robert White flew in record high of 121 per cent,
the X15. * *
* * NEW YORK - Despite profit
ACCRA, Ghana-Queen Eliza- taking which capped a four day
beth Iwas greeted by 500,000 advance, more issues advanced
cheering Ghanaians upon her ar- New Yori stock exchaeonthe
rival there lvsit that hadshe e Standard and Poors' 500 index
worry about her safety. declined .10, as 425 industrials
worr abot he safty.dropped .15, 25 rails dropped .01
President Kwame Nkrumah, and 50 utilities gained .12.
whose political opponents had set
off a series of bombs in recent
days, causing, the Queen's minis-
ters to consider cancelling the vis-
it, stepped forward in greeting.. B.A.T.
WASHINGTON - Despite an nBaA oi o
hour-long plea for mercy by his
attorney, Irvin C. Scarbeck, a for-
mer embassy aide in Warsaw, re-of IeXas
30 years imprisonment yesterday
A 1U4T BAsE
-.OSCAR PETERSON 7uio
UNItMITED !--

EMIL GILELS

Beethoven

Piano Concerti Nos. 1 and 2

ALPHA SIGMA PHI
invites you to attend
THE MATCH OF THE CENTURY
R. L. "HURRICANE" DINGES
vs.
TWENTY-ONE -BEERS
Friday, November 10, 1961 Pretzel Bell
9 P.M.

POUCH
PACK
KEEPS
TOBACCO
FRESHER!

RALE IGH
Pipe smokers appreciate Sir Walter
Raleigh's choice Kentucky Burley.
- extra aged for flavorand mild-
ness. Now kept 44% fresher in the
pouch pack. So relax and get away
from your cares with Sir Walter
Raleigh-the quality pipe tobacco!

IGOR MARKEVITCH WITH THE
MOSCOW PHILHARMONIC AND CHORU

Verdi

Requiem

S
is
man

MISCELLANEOUS ARTISTS

,r r vo , c r o, rnr r, via

HILELI

POPPI

I

Liszt
Liszt
Beethoven
Tchaikovsky
Wagner
Rossini
Richard Strauss
Johann Strauss
Rimsky-Korsakov
Tchaikovsky
Brahms * Liszt
Schubert
Mendelssohn
Handel
Rim sky- Korsakov
Wagne* Delibes
Dukas
Borodin * Rimsky-
Korsakov
Liadov oDergomij sky
Moussorgsky
This is Rumania
This is Hungary

Les Preludes and Tasso
Concerto Pathetique
Moonlight and Appasionata
Sonatas
Swan Lake (complete)
Overtures and Preludes
Overtures
Rosenkavalier Waltzes
Till Eulenspiegel
Waltzes
Coq D'Or and Kitezh Suites
1812 Overture
Hungarian Dances * Hunga
Fantasia
Symphony No. 6
Symphony No. 3 "Scotch"
Water Music
Russian Easter f Sorcerer's

Saturday, Nov. 11, 8 O'Clock
HILL AUDITORIUM

Apprentice,
Good Friday Music * Suite
from Coppelia
Polovtsian Dancese In the
Steppes of Central Asia
Tsar's Bride Overture
Kikimora * Cossack Dance
Night on Bald Mountain

I.

SKITS by FRATERNITIES, SORORITIES, II
STband INDEPENDENTS

I

.I

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