100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 29, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.

THE MICrIGAN DAILY

Premier

(

Iaims Attacks
Test Hysterical

On Bomb

U.S. LIMITS AID:
Ca bodihs ans Threaten
Separation from West

PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (P)-
Prince Norodom Sihanouk, who
has severed diplomatic relations
with Thailand, threatened yes-
terday to lead Cambodia in a com-
plete break with the non-Come-
munist world.
The neutralist chief of govern-
ment in a radio address bitterly
complained that the United States
will not permit military aid grant-
ed Cambodia to be used against
neighboring Thailand.
No Protection
"American military aid, in ef-
Greek Election
Set for Today
ATHENS (J)-Greece may ;lose
Its most stable postwar ;govern-
ment in today's national elections,
but seems certain: to keep its pro-
Western foreign policy.
Premier Constantine Caraman-
lis' ruling National Radical Un-
'ion is virtually certain to emerge
the dominant party, but there is,
doubt it can once again win, the
majority with which it has ruled
Greece with one-party stability
the last six years. .
If it does not, a coalition gov-
ernment from pro-Western par-
ties would have to be formed.

feet, does not permit us to defend
our liberty and independence ex-
cept iri the unique cases when we
are attacked by Communists, who
in the present case do not menace
us," he said.
The prince declared he already
had warned "the Free World, and,
the United States in particular,
that Cambodia will never give in
before the menaces of its neigh-
bors and all those who attack our
neutrality and our independence."
The prince severed relations
with Thailand Monday after Thai
Premier Sarit Thanarat charged
that Cambodia was being used as
a base for Communist attacks
against neighbors.t
Make Offer
Later, the Cambodian Foreign
Ministry offered to open its bor-
ders to prove no Communists were
operating in Cambodia..
Thailand has closed. its borders
with Cambodia but has asked the
United States to help restore dip-
lomatic relations. '
Sihanouk made no mention of
his quarrels with neighboring
South Viet Niem, which, like Thai-
land, has strong ties with the
United States.
"If the U. S. wishes to persuade
itself that we are disinterested,
let them take back this aid which
is accompanied by too much suf-
fering," the prince said.

i
E
i
L

NIKITA S. KHRUSHCHEV
... still plans test

Ask s Statue
For Purged
Bolsheviks
MOSCOW (A') -The Soviet Un-
ion yesterday published an appeal
from Premier Nikita S. Khrush-
chev that a monument be built in
Moscow to the victims of Stalin's
purges.
The premier told the Communist
Party Congress yesterday that
these victims rans into the thou-
sands. This was the first such
public accusation by Khrushchev
in the Soviet Union. His earlier-
denunciations starting with his
1956 speech, have not been pub-
lishgd, here.
The proposal for a monument
was originally made by a group of
old Bolsheviks. Khrushchev's sup-
port indicated that the body of
the late dictator may be moved out
of the Red Square tomb it has
long shared with that of Lenin.
Reports circulated in the Soviet
capital that some students at Mos-
cow University have held meet-
ings to demand Stalin's removal
from the huge mausoleum, a hal-
lowed site for pilgrimages by hun-
dreds of Soviet citizens every day.a
Officials at the university denied
there had been student meetings
yesterday, as reported, but said
students talked of it. Reportsl
came also of similar requests ar-
riving in nonstudent quarters.

Retains Plan
For Setting
Large Blast
Premier Says Allies
Preparing for War
MOSCOW (P) - Soviet Premier
Nikita S. Khrushchev has said the
Soviet Union will go ahead with
the . explosion of a 50-megaton
nuclear bomb despite what he
called the "hysterical clamor of
bourgeoise propaganda" and the
concern "of even fair-minded
people." '
In the face of world appeals to
halt Soviet nuclear testing,
Khrushchev declared before the
Soviet Party Congress Friday that
the Soviet Union "cannot refrain
from carrying out those tests"
because of what he called prepara-
tions for war by the Western Al-
lies.
May Be Today
Khrushchev had said previously
the 50-megaton nuclear bomb-
equal to 50 mfllion tons of TNT-
might be fired tomorrow or Tues-
day.
The text of his speech was with-
held from publication until last
night.
The premier's statement came
hours before the United Nations
General Assembly voted 87-41 urg-
ing cancellation of the superbomb
test.
Khrushchev denounced as
"strange logic" assertions that the
Soviet nuclear tests with their
accompanying fallout were crimes
against humanity in view of
United States atomic bombing of
Hiroshima and Nagasaki in World
War II.
'Still Proud'
He called this an act of "sense-
less brutality and without any
military necessity" and said "some
American politicians were and' are
still proud of this mass' killing."
He said the Soviet decision, to
resume nuclear testing "was ap-,
preciated by all who cherish peace
and refuse to shut their eyes to
the dangerous intrigues of the
enemies of peace."
Khrushchev rejected appeals to
halt the tests from various or-
ganizations in a number of Neu-
tralist and Western countries.

Tw o States
Seen Likely
To Get Seat
UNITED NATIONS (IP) - Com-
munist Romania and the Western-
allied P'hilippines are expected to
become deadlocked in their race
for the so-called Eastern European
seat on the United Nations Secur-
ity Council.
Some diplomats expressed be-
lief the deadlock would go on for
days and finally be settled by
giving the first year of the two-
year. term to one..cuntry and the
second year to another.
Romania and the 'Philippines
are rivals to succeed Turkey in
a non-permanent seat on the 11-
nation council for a two-year term
to start next Jan. 1L
The General Assembly is to hold
an election Monday to fill this
and other vacancies on the Se-
curity Council and the Economic
and Social Council.
To win, any candidate must get
the approval of two-thirds of
those voting in the 103-nation
assembly-that is, 69 countries, if
all members vote.
Philippine delegates have been
saying they have 50 votes promised
and a good prospect of 60. They
have predicted that ,the Philip-
pines will pick up enough votes
on the second or third ballot to
get the full term.
The Romanians have been
claiming they have promises of
45 votes. That would be enough
to keep the Philippines from get-
ting in if Romania's support stood
fast.
The seat at issue was allotted to
Eastern Europe in the so-called
1946 London "gentlemen's agree-
ment" for geographical distribu-
tion of the six non-permanent
places on the council, which is
charged with keeping world peace.
The Soviet Union contends that
it belongs to the Communist coun-
tries. The United States holds that
non-Communist countries of East-
ern Europe should share it with
the Far. East.
World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
BERLIN - The United States;
Air Force sent a plane circling
over Berlin at low level yesterday,
reasserting American rights to fly1
there despite a Soviet protest.c
The two big powers had ended:
a 16-hour warlike facedown onlyl
a short time before by withdraw-
ing tanks from Berlin's perilous
border front. Through the night
the tanks' guns had pointed at
one another at pointblank range
of 200 yards.
MIAMI - The Miami News said
last night in a copyrighted dis-
patch from Ciudad Trujillo that
Gen. Rafael L. Trujillo, head of
the Dominican Republic armed
forces, has conditionally agreed
to leave his country after recent
riots.
* * *
RIO DE JANEIRO - Brazil's
cabinet yesterday called on citizens
for discipling and sacrifice to slow
skyrocketing living costs. The
Neves government ordered drastic
slashes in its own spending as part
of the program.

By G. K. HODENFIELD
Asociated Press Education Writer
BLOOMFIELD, Ia.-One out of
every three high school seniors in
this country today has been denied
a good education because the
school he attends is too small.
Not one high school in four is
big enough to afford the courses,
the facilities, and the teachers
needed to provide a substantial
program, James B. Conant, presi-
dent-emeritus of Harvard Univer-
sity said after his two-year study
of the American public high
school.
Proof, and the remedy, are to
be found here in Davis County,
Iowa.
From Many, One
In 1959 the voters of Davis
County went to the polls and over-
whelmingly approved a school dis-
trict reorganization plan that com-
bined 62 separate school districts
into one.
The vote abolished 55 one-room
schools. It also abolished the Troy
and Pulaski High Schools.
That September, 50 boys and
girls from Troy and Pulaski en-
rolled in Bloomfield High School,
and suddenly a wide and wonder-
ful world began to unfold.
More Courses
Now they could study a foreign
language, take a fourth year of
English, and schedule courses in
physics, chemistry, trigonometry,
economics, sociology, geography,
advanced civics, shorthand-even
driver education.
All these had been denied them
in Pulaski (population 389) and
Troy (population 394) because the
high schools there were too small.
During the 1960-61 school year,
its last year in existence, Pulaski
High had 46 students and .four
full-time teachers. Troy had 25
students and three full-time teach-
ers.
National Problem
This isn't just an Iowa problem,
it is national in scope.' Only in
California and New Jersey do 90
per cent of the high school seniors
attend schools which are large
enough by accepted standards.
The problem is particularly se-
vere in such states with scattered
populations as Arkansas, Ken-
tucky, Kansas, Louisiana, Nebras-
ka, Mississippi, North Carolina,
North Dakota, Oklahoma, South
Dakota, Vermont and Wyoming.
In these states, 9 out of 10 high
schools have fewer than 100 stu-
dents in the graduating class.
In recent years, Iowa has led
the nation in reorganizing and
consolidating its school districts,
and in eliminating the too-small
high school.
v~j'P~~Lt:

Crisis in U.S. High Schools:
Too Many, Too Small

chants.

S unbelievable light
new

This is appropriate, because
Iowa has been among the last of
the states to get started on the
program.
Cut Four Times
Nationally, there are nearly
40,000 separate school boards.The
President's Commission on Na-
tional Goals says this number
should be reduced to not more
than 10,000 by 1970.
This is a large order, and it
won't be easily achieved. .
Small towns are reluctant to
give up their high schools, no mat-
ter how inefficient they might be.
Basketball Teams
Having a high school gives them

status of a sort. In the Midi
West, particularly, . these cr<
roads hamlets treasure their hi
school basketball teams. The tea
is a focal point of commun
interest. And-because the your
sters often play together for 10.
years-a small high school te
frequently wins the state chan
pionship.
Consolidation, such as that nc
going on in Iowa,; nearly alwa;
means an increase in taxes
rural areas.
There also is a fear of losi
local control of the schools, a
a loss of business to local me
chants.

long-leg
panty girdle.
by

t,
" ' Q _
P ,
t :a ,
j , ,

MONTH-END
Value Treats

1

'' :h ...
.. ,
.:::,L . . .. ti

..the new love of your
figure life, no matter what
your figure type,
A miracle blend of
fibers without rubber,
it's airy light, machine-
washable, fast-drying, and
comfortable. This Nemo
lovely is destined for d
long, happy life without,
losing any of its shape
molding manners!Try
Nemo's white weightess
wonder today!
Small, Medium, Large in white
$ 95

f in car coats, all -weat her. coats, and dresses are
mSE.BUS

. 'J+:t}"d mt Ei~ :"'..':.:.,: ::: =:: " . : t l." Nf . "h-t ":- :.3e

j
4 1,ADIEB
_ tr i
. MAIN at 1.181"RTY
t

did
you
IfOW
that

r; r,".. n..".c: . :"rrrrvc.rT'rS.Yi7i%{S"Y.":":":":ia{: }i:Zs:e
:;:. ,
,:.
ti"'
ti
,rq
;.n
i1{
iff '
i'"v..
1
LJ
:::ti:
{
:?? .}
i :': S,
Y'
tif4
:i "
i:
:::::. 'Sy .
.'. ":::'i' l
;rr. .;r t; '
' %' r
:t g
{ ::
r:4
:Sr.
1'fp
': 1
'F
< :
i:
ti
rJ
iS y:
:':
{
ar yt:
Wf y
Pry
'raj
{t
{
r}i
,
r'r, ;
i ' a, W
1 "
': :'i
;4. i w
'f' 9T
1:.
{{
1"
" s e
r tw
4:
:{
:Vy'
s m
:
: :
"r . .
:s
rr
by
;
ti
V:
i::'
:{y'f
:.]:t
5""". 1/9IIl II '

L'

8 NICKELS ARCADE

Phone NO 2-2941

27/he (IareL/.uren Sho

'.1'

glves you
wice the

W

GAY
GIBSON
and
are the best of friendr?

[I

ear! 4

PLAID

S

RIRT

S

L
ยข Y

$ 790

I

win thread
alking shees'
eamless for beauty,
"in Threadot fservice
mort coming and goings
35 pair

Reg. 11.95 and 12.95
BEAUTIFUL TONES to light
up your wardrobe,
in SLIM or PLEATED Styles

/

-Sizes 8 to

16.

I'

OPEN MONDAY NIGHT
TILL 8:30 P.M.

II

f-:,

E[

,

I.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan