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October 29, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

AND THING':
]ole Urges Greater Exchange

'S

MARTHAMacNEAL

If the money spent for arma-
nts could be spent instead in
ltural exchange, it would be a'
nd thing for all nations," said
rian Dobrosielski, counselor of
'Polish Embassy,
Dobrosielski visited Ann Arbor
efly to attend the performance
the Mazowsze 'Polish Sang anid
uce Company Tuesday.
Cultural exchange is certain-
one of our hopes for interna-
nal understanding," -he contin-
I. "But it is only a supplemen-
y means. We must look more'
yards relaxed tensions in poll-
s. The billions spent for the
ns race are out of proportion.
must put first things first and
centrate on disarmament,"
Developed Well
United States-Polish cultural
hange began immediately after
rld War II. Exchange with the
ited States and other countries
reloped well until the advent of
"cold war" in 1950 reduced
tact. But by 1955 the situation
an to show improvement, and
years since 1957 have shown
gressive growth in all fields,
brosielski noted.
'he Mazowsze company is tour-
the United ,States under gov-
etsch To View
rchitectu.ral h' Art
'The Place of Art in Architec-
e" will be discussed by Walter
bsch at 3:30 p.m. tomorrow at'
Architectural Auditorium. The
ture is open to the public.

ernment arrangements which also
sponsored the Slask Polish sing-
ers and dancers in 1959. The
groups take their names from re-
gions of Poland. Mazowsze is the
area around Warsaw, from which
100 dancers and singers, aged 16-
25, were selected from 5,000- appli-
cants. The group, founded in 1948,
studies at a country house 20 miles
from the center of Warsaw.
The Polish National Philhar-
monic Orchestra and many Polish
soloists have also visited the
United States and Poland has re-
ceived the Philadelphia Orchestra,
Artur Rubenstein, a production of
"Porgy and Bess,".:and. various.
groups from the United States.
Audiences Sophisticated
"Polish audiences in the larger
cities are very sophisticated, be-
cause they can often see the most
celebrated ensembles from differ-
ent countries," Dobrosielski said.
"They are pleased with any good
performance, and all -American
programs are on a high level and
well received."
Dobrosielski found it difficult
to suggest specific ways of im-
proving the United :States; side of
cultural exchange. "Distnce some-
times necessitates a commercial
aspect in exchange, and it pre-
sents an obstacle to large-scale
programs. Cultural exchange does
not develop quickly, but in most
fields it has begun and is im-
proving, and will work out well,"
he declared. .
Dobrosielski cited the oppor-
tunity of discussion between mem-
bers of Polish and American or-

chestras as one of the benefits
of cultural exchange. "But this
will be difficult for the Mazowsze
dancers because their schedule is
crowded and there are no similar
groups in the United States," he
said. "But only such technicalities
present problems of communica-
tion." ,
Embassy Contacts
The Polish embassy contacts
American officials to make sugges-
tions in planning exchanges and
selecting groups to tour. Under.
Poland's liberalized cultural trend,
$1.2 million is spent by Poland
each year to buy American books
and films. _Translations are of ten'
exchanged. The mragazine " PO-
land" on American newsstands
corresponds with the Polish maga-
zine "Ameryka."
fQ . g
P'rogram
Not es
The New York Pro Musica, un-
der the direction of Noah Green-
berg, will present a special con-,
cert interpreting Renaissance and
pre-Renaissance music. at 2:30
p.m. today in Rackham Aud.
'a * *r
The Asia Society Performing
Arts Program will present Ravi
Shankar, Indian sitarist and com-
poser, with Kanai Dutta, table and
N. C. Mullick, tamboura, in a
program of Indian music at 8 p.m.
tomorrow at Rackham Lecture
Hall..
# * *
Mu Phi Epsilon and Sigma Al-
pha Iota, professional music sor-
orities, will open their formal rush
program today with a joint musi-
cale and discussion at 7:30 p.m.
in the Michigan Union. Academ-
ically eligible music majors are
invited to attend.

Professors
View Unity
.
In Sc ience+
By HELENE SCHIFF
Two University professors agreed
that the unity found among sci-
entists today is not solely a by-
product of space study, as a na-
tional official had implied.'
Instead, scientists working to-
gether have stimulated the space
age and the space age in turn has
mutually provided an impetus for
their unity, Prof. Dean B. Mc-
Laughlin of the astronomy de-
partment said.
In reference to a statement by
Dr. Robert. Jastrow of the Na-:
tional Aeronautics and Space Ad-
ministration,: which stated that
the space age has created the "re-
emergence of a natural philosophy
among scientists," Prof. Arthur W.
Burks of the philosophy depart-1
ment pointed out that such a uni-
ty existed before the space age,
too.
Combined Efforts
It was the curiosity of both as-
tronomers and physicists to see
what makes the sun and stars shine
that encouraged this unified re-
search, Prof. McLaughlin added.
The. term "natural philosophy"
has a much broader connotation
today than in the time of Sir
Isaac Newton, Prof. Burks noted.
Unify Areas
In Newton's era physics and
philosophy were under one unified
area but today "the many inter-'
discpilinary activities in the field
of science are like small islands
which are connected by bridges,"
he said..
This joining of the branches of
science was accelerated by World
War II, Prof. McLaughlin said.
Scientists were placed in positions
by -the government where they
had to become more closely relat-
ed to other scientists from differ-
ent fields.

WOMEN'S PROBLEMS:
Assembly Discussions
Consider Three Topics

T he Cottage In Pizzeria
and
The Brown Jug Restaurant
PIZZA Free Deliver PIZZA
Pizza delivered free in hot portable ovens.
Real Italian food is our specialty.
Cottage Inn 3-5902 Brown Jug 8-9819
512 E. Williams 1204 S. University
Free Delivery Flee Delivery Free Delivery

Free Delivery

Free Delivery Free

By ELLEN SILVERMAN
Three areas independent wo-
men have expressed concern over
-- coeducational housing, safety
in the residence halls and corridor
communication - were discussed
at an Assembly Association work-
shop yesterday.
Regarding coeducational hous-
ing, Peter A. Ostafin, assistant to
the vice-president of student af-
fairs, commented that "there is
a sensible approach and a 'gung-
ho' approach to the topic."
.The sensible approach is to con-
sider. all sides of- the particular
issue and view them in perspective
to the desire for such housing
units and the feasibility of imple-
menting such a program in the
existing facilities.
Different Approach
The gung-ho approach is rush-
ing' in blindly without considering
the various aspects to the problem.
In viewing the issue "sensibly,"
considerations will have to . be
made for the problems of physical
facilities, Assembly vice-president
Marylou Seldon, '62Ed., noted. She
explained that bed sizes for men
and women vary as do closet
space; number of mirrors, furni-
ture construction and room space
allotment.,
Secondly, problems of regula-
tions and "communal areas" will
have to be solved. A major prob-
lem would be that of implementing
women's closing hours in a dormi-
tory which would stay open all
night for men.
Study Needed
Ostafin pointed out that action
taken would require thorough
study into. the matter. He indicat-
ed that previous studies made in.
this area; such as the plan for
Bursley Hall on North Campus,
would certainly be studied and re-
considered for new ideas.
Assembly president Sally Jo

,,

Sawyer, '62, stressed the need for
women's opinion on the subject.
"We want to know what the wo-
men feel before we can go ahead.
with our committee planning," she
said.
In the area of safety, it was
pointed out that the primary func-
tion now is to "educate" and in-
form residents on the safety de-
vices and protective measures
which take place in the dormi-
tories.
It is essential that residents.
know how safety measures are in-
itiated and how devices such as
fire alarms work.
Traffic Hazard
Discussion took place" regarding
the traffic hazard of Forest Ave.
It was pointed out that a proposed
bridge over the street is very
costly and thus far no one had
found a way to finance the pro-
ject. . .
Corridor representatives discuss-
ed the problem of house communi-
cation. The role of a corridor rep-
resentative is to inform the wo-
men on her floor of activities so
that each{ woman is able to find
areas which would interest her.
It is not, however, the job of a
"corridor rep" to force any wo-
men, into activities since. wo-
men live in the dorm to be in-
dependent, the participants agreed.
Petitioning Opens
For Committee
Petitions are now available at
the Engineering Library in the
Undergraduate Library, the En-
gineering Arch and the southwest
entrance of the East Engineering
Bldg. for positions on the . En-
gineer's Weekend Central Com-
mittee.

"

THE COLLEGIATE CLUB
p resents:
MARTIN LUT H ER
(a film)
TODAY at 5:30 P.M
University Reformed Church
(Temporary Quarters YM-YWCA,
E. Williams & Fifth Avenue)

L

"MAKES
SEEM

THE BRIGHTEST BROADWAY MUSICAL
PALE INDEED" -Newsweek

"EXCITING" .7
m-Wqlttr WincketU
"EYE RAVISHING";
-Mw+ k. N.i. :Tlues :
"ENCHANTING"
..-Csdy. CbIcog rib

"' ..
> .-
t
i ;

"""

ISA Presents

R. WOLGA NGNSTRASMANN
General Manager of the
BERLIN PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA
and son of the chancellor and
foreign minister of Weimar Republic

'THE PERFECT HOUSE':

IQC Talks Back Student Government

Who Will Discuss:

"BERLIN: TALE OF A CITY"

Friday, Nov. 3

4:15 P.M.

UGLI Multipurpose Room

SQPI-I SI-IC

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(Continued from Page 1) y
All agreed that student govern-{
ment should be a part of the de-
cisio making process regarding the
residence hall rules that most im-
mediately affect the student.
In discussion of dress regula-
tions, no overall opinion was
reached.
Daniel Gold, '63, sai, "It is the
responsibility of the Unicersity to
inculcate in men and women cer-
tain basic values of the. society.
Original Thilosophy
"This was the original philoso-
phy; students should have some
degree of social polish.".
Others suggested modification
of present:standards, claiming that
such rules do not actually im-
prove the tone of the dining areas
and that it is an infringement on
the individual.1
Considering the role of the
staff, delegates agreed that .staffl
men ought to be friendly but re-
main' sufficiently apart from his
charges to retain their respect.
Should Be Senior
Participants also suggested that
he be at least a senior, experi-
enced in the academic ways of the
University and.. able to give guid-*
ance to freshmen.
A suggestion was also made for
the segregation of freshmen into
different houses--or into different
parts of the same house so that

they could still have contact with.
upper-classmen who could help
orient them to the campus.
Under this arrangement, there
would be less supervision of up-
per-classmen and more attention
paid to the needs of freshmen.,
Criticize Judic-
Judic drew the heaviest crit-
cism' of an yaspect of the quad-
rangle. Although Assistant Dean
of Men in charge of residence
halls John Hale said, "we must
enhance the position of judic,"
many participants criticized it as
"ineffective" or as a "tool" or as
a "kangaroo court."
One former house judic member
said, "There's not too much re-
spect for judic in my,house."
"I seriously wonder how much-
good it (judic) does. There is no
room for any outside proof or wit-
nesses. The complainant is usual-
ly a staff man.
"There is an assumption of

guilt. The only reason for stu-
dents doing the punishing is so
that the accused does not feel him-
self persecuted by the staff."
Apathy in the quads was an-
other area in which the confer-
ence dealt. Opinion tended to
blame apathy among .freshmen
whoare loqkingforward. to mov-
ing into an apartment.
DIAL 2-6264
Academy Award
talk has begun for
NATALIE WOOD

KNOWLE DG.
A NEW SERIES
PROF. JOHN HIGHAM
speaks on..
"THE HISTORIAN
AS A MORAL CRITIC"
Sunday, Oct. 29
3:00 r.M.
650 RADIO

PHIL.IPPINE
DANCE IPN
COMPANY Y
MON., NOV. 6, 8:30
iHiLL AUDITORIUM
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT:
$4.00 -$3.$0 -$2.25 -$1.53
YNIVERSITY MUSICAL SCIETY
Burton Memorial Tower

We are now
Delivering
DOMINIK'S
PIZZA and SUBS
NO 2-5474

. NOVEMBER 16-18
LYDIA II TICK
MENDELSSOHN 1.50 1
THEATER I 1.75 Fri.
BLOCK ORDER
at the League Undergraduat

Continuous
From
1 o'clock

DIAL
NO 5-6290

T'S most compasslonate romantic drana'

for her sensational per-
formance in Elia Kazan's
production of William
Inge's first play especially
wrtten for the screen.
SPLENDOR
,E GRASS
TECMNICOLOR- IaWWARNER BROS.
FEATURE STARTS
t:00 - 3:00 - 5:05

.-
- ~~ ~-
--
Aill the best peoplea on c amprus are rushing to the
INTERNATIONAL
Friday, November 3 Union Ballrooni
9 s:00 P.M.s r Admission
Refreshments ' per couple, $2.50

",

I

I

S.G.C.
TONIGHT at 7 and 9
MY WANDERINGS
Mark Donskoi's
The Gorkv Triloav. Part2

~1

D UI CI'ARI.ES . KEViRGINIA GREY. REGINALD GARDINER
8%M EWII ~a UIer.itgnationaI Redeass
VE NERAX BRES AFAT T IFAN'S
NEXT: "BREAKFAST AT TI FFANY'S"

N+
P-A'

JOSEPH E. LEVINE presents
Sopha Loren.
WINNER BEST ACTRESS AWARD
CANNES FILM FESTIVAL 1961
TFOR HIER PERFORMANGE IN'
T 8M.N

DIal
NO 8-6416

THE

REFORMATION DAY SERVICE
NEW REFORMATION
REV. PETER H. ELDERSVELD, Speaker
T.V. and Radio Minister of "The Back To God Hour"

I

I

E

_. _

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