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October 03, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

VO THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUE AS

DAY,

utionAid
- t
Insufficient
For Center
By GERALD STORCH
Although the amount of Uni-
versity-sponsored scholarships has
increased during the past year,
the number is still inadequate to
handle the International Center's
needs, counselor Robert Klinger
said yesterday.
Last spring the Regents ex-!
panded the scholarship budget
from about $22,500 to nearly $40,-
000, thus providing funds for 60
tuition grants.
Coupled with the other' scholar-
ships available to foreign students,
the 60 would bring the percentage
of University foreign students on
aid to about ten per cent; Last
year, according to a survey re-
search report, the total was seven
per cent.
Survey Discovery
One of the major findings of
the survey, however, was that ap-
proximately 12 per cent of foreign
students considered their financial
support inadequate.
This need is borne out by the
fact that there are two or three
times as many applications for
the scholarships as there are
available, Klinger remarked.
One of the major reasons caus-
ing the situation is that many for-
eign students are married and find
it very difficult to support their
families.
Working Wives
One method to relieve the fi-
nancial burden of married foreign
students would be to allow their

PSYCHOLOGY:
Gordon's Sp
Stories Curb
By CAROLYN WINTER
Prof. Jesse M Gordon of the
psychology department has com-
pleted a study which, shows that a
simple story designed to arouse
"affiliated needs" actually curbs a
child's "aggression."
"The most significant thing is
that as simple a thing as telling
a story about loneliness reduces
aggressive behavior," Prof. Gordon
explained. His study is the first
to use the "affiliation needs"
drive to control the expression of
the "aggression" drive.
His studies show, that:
Children Diminish
1) Highly aggressive children
actually diminished in aggressive
behavior when affiliation needs
are aroused through a story, white
less aggressive children remained
approximately the same.
2) Children whose fathers do
not live at home with them showed
more aggressiveness but also pos-
sessed a greater potential for in-
hibition of aggression.
3) The incitement of the affilia-
tion drive seemed to have the
same relative effect on young girls
as on young boys, despite the
common belief that girls are 'more
responsive to such stimulation.
Nineteen boys and 17 girls, four

rve Finds BRIDGE LESSONS
Aggression 8 week course-$4.50
T s. O.7
h}LEAGUE
L MASS hMEETIN
Wednesday, Oct. 4 at 7:15
DANCING LESSONS on Tuesday or Wednesday
each week beginning October 10.
t ? CONVENTIONAL DANCING (fox trot,. new waltz,
jitterbug) 4 weeks $4
LATIN DANCING (cha cha, rhumba, tango)
4 weeks $4
LEAGUE*,
PROF. JESSE GORDON
... conducts experiment DIAL NO 2-6264
Adult Evenings $1.25 Hurry! Last 4 Days!
and five years old, participated in Adult matinees 59c Ending Friday
the experiment. ' children under 12 S50 \Note: : Shows Daily
The psychologists first measur- at 1:00 - 4:30 8:10
ed how aggressive each child was
before his affiliation drive was "A terrific showi Director Preminger is at the top o
aroused. This was accomplished bis form.. The script seems an amazing achievement
by asking questions about dolls clear, intellibent, subtle, witty, swift, strong, eloquent.
and from the answers classifying
the children as either "high ag- EXODUS turns out to be a serious, expert, frightenng
gressive"'or;"low aggressive." and inspiring thrilleri" - rme Mgeoli *M
Then the children were placed
at random into two groups, an **A stirring film droml
experimental group and a control
group. The experimental group "'(Q CMIJII
was told a story about a dog look-
ing for playmates. The other
group was told the same story
only the dog was looking for a
ball. This story is calculated to
give a neutral effect. XEJDLJB┬░
Future Significance
Immediately following the story- Q j6 PREMINGER PRESENTS
telling, a second interview of-
the same type as the first was PAUL NEWMAN - EVA MARIE SAINT
conducted to measure the child's RPH RICHARSON PER LA F RD
aggressiveness.
Mrs. Fay Coh, Grad, collabor- LEE J.C088 -SAL MINE *JOHN DEK
ated with Prof. Gordon on the
study.
These studies of arousal by
story-telling may have possible
significance for literature, prop-
aganda, and advertising, Gordon
said.
N~IE NIGHT ONLY! CENTRAL COMMITTEE
1 - 8:15 P.M.
The Weqvers PETITIONING
Oratunji
Tory Makem _m
Tom akemThrough Thursday, Oct. 5
rchives of American Art
4TION ARENA
D SARKESIANt
e'ords, 337 south Main St.
3- $4 -$5 - $6. Please send petitions va ladle at
Md envelope for marlsorders
M ich"igras Office
MchiganUlnicn

S5i

Mature Sti3fficiently thehwives to work, Klinger continued. T
The new system Is designed toa u ith A Horeignexsuchange clausrecently swil
help the students mature suffi- passed by Congress was voted at t
briny to accptnd comply withdown by both houses. E
ie regulations necessary for safe-T gand>n
'and group living, rather than tov The legislation did allowthe i u
inish," Assistant Dean of Wom- wives to come on the same visas rue
Leona Munson said as their husbands, thus saving sen
inder this system, each worn- them from registering twice a ity.
Ungaea h will-haveitson year and paying afee to do so, but at t
s ien ari commit mad Klinger is "very doubtful" that the atte
) ofncmembr s fonm It see owne i Im m igration Office will allow the exis
oup. These committees will be " wives to work, although author- a
rmed fist in the' e es hmal ity to do so is provided in the T
amed , irst inh.the'freshman { Lil free
rms, but will be expanded to bil. fre
iude sorority and rooming Nevertheless, the, center is com-
ses municating with congresmen and
s ommittee Authority citing specific cases in hopes of
The proposal gives the residence ┬░ kobtaining the measure.
aring committees the authority University Scholarships
issue a newly-created "univer- w Univ , T e60shrsisholars hip e
T tphe 60 scholarsips gvn bythe
ty warnh g" as its highest 'pen-
ty. uch arnngs wil be eptUnivesity provide tuition ($375)
1 the student's record in the for one semester, with the grant
ea ofWoen's Offebu will hreviewable for the second sees-
y; au E uApplicants must demonstrate
sufficient scholarship '(the criter-
8 ..ion for undergraduate foreign stu-
dents is usually about 2.8) and fi
lea Annountes nancial need, although they must
S be able to maintain themselves in
JOa, nsRemachtheir non-tuition expenses.
About 13 per cent of foreign
^ students are teaching fellows or
loaps Reach * ""< are otherwise working for the Uni-
versity, Klinger said, and this
The -University granted more factor tends to alleviate the finan-
an $1.4 million in student loans i.l s.ituaionfor fore.gn stud.n.
1960-81chairman of the Uni- Daily-Ed Langs ciahsituation for foreign students
rslty Committee on Student HIGH AND AWAYFilm Editor Michael 3. Berla of the television somewhat.
oans and Deas of Men Walter B. center rides high over the campus as he "shoots" Angell Hall for
ea reported. the projected motion picture, 'The Idea of Michigan,' which 'the
Currentfigutes, which mark an television center is currently producing.
icrease of $12,800 over 1959-60-
tals, include loans made from EndingaltlA.lITrn
ational Defense, Education Act Thursday'I DIAL
'ands, Dean Rea noted in his an- Trs* A
ial report to University President Continuous Today J iNO 8-6416
rathe Fromn 1, P.M. Oi i 1b"Pettioning now open fo
Ddan, Rea's figures Indicated P
hat borrowers received more sub- M p . Da , and stunt publcity
ta~tial.o loans,' averaging $202 in .Diy n tn ulctp
)061.over $186 for the previous : I.dietr
eras a edirecor.
S' Petitions available at League
Vt 'Senate Meeting Ocoe2-T
purro interviewg starts Wednes
Prof. Stephen Spurr of silvi- ~1 t 3e s
dlture will. speak tomorrow at raoulaeva produc lion dre a henri- gne CQlO a ainsle ialertatinal reease
:15 p n. in the Michigan League
a meeting of the Women's Sen-
Ile will discuss the year-round
cagem 6 schedule. }
the UNIVERSITY of MICHIGAN BANDS
DIALNO 5-6290 present
} ENDING THURSDAY
'N ALUSTY, FITNG YO1NG
ADVENTURER TURNED INTO.
ASAINTLY IRAN OF 600.
CThe
, y4
'IF.."

vim mers
'o Hold Meet
he University Speed Swim Club
sponsor a women's all-campus
mming meet, 8 p.m. tomorrow
he Women's Pool.
ach woman will swim as an
vidual, but the points she ac-
es go toward her team, repre-
ting either a dorm or a soror-
All strokes will be represented
he meet in 25 yard races, and
empts will be made to break
ting collegiate records. Delta
mma won the meet in 1961.
'he meet is open to the public,
of charge.
IN, PERSON ! 01
SAT.,OCT., 2
T1.hea. Bikel
Odettoa
Cloncy Bros.
an
For the belefit of the A
COBO CONVEh
Production, by El
Tickets oni sale at Discount R
ALL ,SEATS RESERVD-$2 $;
enclosed self-addressed, stamper

I

riONING,

r campus

publicity,

properties, and chorale
Undergraduate Office
hursday, October th.
day, October, 4th.

a

Pettinee

Petitioning now open for campus publicity, Daily
and stunt publicity, roperties and call director.
Petitions available at League Undergraduate Offices
Monday. October.2-" Thursday, October 5

1

Interviewing begins Wednesday October 4

14

tIc 9dm tciety

1

announces
200 Subscriptions' Open for te196-2Sre

Oct. 9: THE GENERAL (dir. by Buster Keaton,
U.S., 1927); and THE NEW YORK HAT (dir, by
D. W. Griffith, U.S., 1912)
Oct. 23: QUAI DES BRUMES (written by Jacques
Prevert, dir. by Marcel Carne, France, 1938) ; and
THE SMILING MADAME BEUDET (dir. by Ger-
maine Dulac, France, 1922)
Nov. 13: FRAGMENT OF AN EMPIRE (dir. by
Friedrich Ermler, USSR, 1928) ; and THE FIRE-
MAN (dir. by Charles Chaplin, U.S., 1916)
Dec. 4: THE SEVEN SAMURAI (THE MAGNIFI-
r L k . JFrl irk i t IJ:. V.. A ..l.,i /.......,, 1 ....

Feb. 12: SOUS LES TOITS DE PARIS, (dir. by Rene
Clair, France, 1930); and FANTASY FOR FOUR
STRINGS (dir. by Albert Pierru, France, 1957)
Mar. 5: THE GENERAL LINE (dir. by Sergei Eisen-
stein, USSR, 1929); and HIS MARRIAGE WOW
(dir. by Mack Sennett, with Harry Langdon)
Mar. 26: SHOESHINE (dir. by Vittorio de Sica,
Italy, 1947); and NIGHT MAIL (dir. by Harry
Watt und Basil Wright, Great Britain, 1936)

'^

A f-

_ " ens ;, __

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