100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 20, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Business School Conference Investigates State's Future

Unemployment caused by de-
pendence on a consumer industry
and high prices due to strong
unionization are other problems
which Michigan must face, he
said.'
Stevenson sees remedies in the
constitutional convention, diver-
sification of industry and coopera-
tion of labor, management, gov-
ernment and politicians. Con-con
could streamline the tax and gov-
ernment structure, making Michi-
gan more efficient and thus at-
tracting more and varied industry.
Research, requiring a rich eco-
nomic and culturally advanced en-
vironment, may well be a major
industry of Michigan, Stevenson
said.
State's Reputation
But Michigan's biggest problem,
a damaged reputation, can only
be solved by "all of us," by be-
lieving in and selling the State
of Michigan.

The concrete problem of keep-
ing business creative and flexible
to meet the rapid changes in pros-
perity and product demand was,
discussed by Taylor.
He concentrated on the effort
of the individual firm toward sta-
bilization since management can-
not, through self-planning, avoid
the business cycle.
"It would be extremely dan-
gerous for the businessman to lead
people to believe that he has as-
sumed such responsibility," he
continued.
He saw the major asset to busi-
ness stabilization as good, crea-

ducts, but research must come
first.
According to Boyd, the nation's
survival depends on its techno-
logical, economic and industrial
strength. To maintain this, a high
rate of industrial growth is neces-
sary. It is essential that Michigan
make a special effort to promote
growth. Innovation leading to new
products is the critical factor in
developing economic growth, he
said.
With the great advances in re-
search techniques products rapidly
become obsolete. To survive for
any length of time, an enterprise

Committee
To Outline
fall Theme
The Homecoming Mass Meet-
ing will be held at 7:30 p.m. to-
day in the Ballroom of the Mich-
igan League.
Each of the central committee
members will give a small speech
outlining the events taking place
Oct. 20 and 21.
Tomorrow night will mark the
first official announcement of this
year's theme. The meeting is open
to everyone.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN for announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered organizations only.
Organizations planning to be active for
the Fall semester should register by
OCTOBER 10, 1961. Formsavailable,
3011 Student Activities Building. Ex-
ception to this procedure is subject to
Student Government Council approval.
s* s
Near East Club, Meeting, Sept. 22, 8
p.m., W. Conf. Rm., 4th Floor, Rack-
ham. Speaker: Dr. Wm. Schorger: "why
Study the Near East?" Refreshments
served.
* * *
Newman Club (Catholic Study Org.),
Dance "Rendezvous Richard," follow-
ing an introduction to the Newman
Club at 8 p.m., Sept. 22, 8:30 p.m., 331
Thompson,

ST. JOSEPH CONFERENCE:
Republicans Get Plan Prior To Meeting
(Continued from Page 1) '
Th n ~ra t. c+ +t h n ait f i n sei1via n ra litnt

tive management. To meet this must continui to keep abreast or
increasing demand for creativity, ahead of the short life cycle of
Taylor suggested each firm adopt products.
a long range planning program. Neglected Facilities

a graduate engineer. In this skill-
ed area there are many job op-
portunities, and the community
colleges could be expanded to
meet this need.
List of Moderates
In the area of mental health,
the eight moderates who include
Sen. John Fitzgerald (R-Grand
Ledge), Sen. Frederic Hilbert (R-
Wayland), Sen. Harry Litowich
(R-Benton Harbor), Sen. William
Milliken (R-Traverse City), Sen.
Farrell Roberts (R-Pontiac), Sen.
Thomas Schweigert (R-Petoskey),
Sen. John Stahlin (R-Belding),
and Thayer, thought that a-care-
ful reconsideration of the program
was needed.
Exchange Hours
Set by Block 'M'
The Wolverine Club office in
the Student Activities Building
will be open from 9:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m. today for students who
have not yet exchanged their yel-
low Block 'M' identification cards
for football tickets, Wolverine
Club President Judith Caplan,

r

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Joyce Dixon, Janet Eighmey, Mary El-
more, Gretchen Engelbach, Linda L.
Ellis, Judith M. Ebner, Frederick N.~
Ernst,
Sandra Finley, Cara S. Fuchs, Mar-
garet Jane Ford, Wendy Fischgrund,
Akram Fahmi, Alma Forst, John A.
Farrer,F3rd, Janet C. Frieswyk, Mary
Anne Frank, Lorenie G. Foster, Joan C.
Friedman, Carolyn R. Foltz, Hanni
Feurer, Kathryn Gillay, Nancy Lucile
Gale, Gerald Gardner, Jane L. Grabois,
Joan Geisendorfer, Joan 'Verna Good-
man, Leni Geller, Mary Irene Godden,
Joann L. Gobel, Carolyn L. Grebe, Nan-
cy Goldner, Lisa Gould, Martha Glom-
set, Steven Haller, Susanna K. Hubley,
Linda Jane Homan, Parker Franklin
Hallberg, Faith Hornbacher, Victor E.
Henrichs, Jacquie Louise Heston, Lewis
C. Himmell, M. Ethel Heffernan,
Charles Heffernan, Merrilie Frances
Harvey, Magdalena Horn, Charles David
Harris, Cynthia Hall, Susan W. 'Hen-
derson, Emily Hewitt, Jan Hurschburg-
er, Bonnie Heinz, Mary C. Hiniker, Kar-
en Ruth Holvick, Lucille Houston, Wini-
fred Ann Helliar, Claire Hammer, Alan
Dale Hubley,
HiltrudyIde, Betty Jean Isaacson, Mi-
chael E. Johnson, Marjory Elizabeth
Jones, Harriett K. Johnsen. Elizabeth
Ann Johnson, Anita Jackson, Stephen
Gerald Johnston, Lawrence Ronald Ja-
cobs, Erna Kochendorfer, Lora Krap-
ohl, Howard Barry Kleckner, Edward
Klinenberg, Lois Ann Karls,ENina
Koenigsberg, Alice Jane Keller, Melin-
da Kraus, Harriet Kaufman, Paul E.
King, Ivan D.. Kovacs, John L. Kripl,
Margaret Karp, Jeffrey Louis Karasick,
Joan I. Kittle, Joyce Kosloski, Nancy
Kaden, Henry G. Kunsmann, Margaret
Klee, Kay Karchevski, Merlyn Kellogg,
Diane Elizabeth Kewley, Loni Kiraldi,
Fred Russell Kramer, Joan E. Kinsey,
Ann Marie Kleis, Elizabeth Lee Kiat-
zky, Frances Anne Kaiman, Karen
Koykka, Marion L. Kempe, Mary Jane
Knapp,
Laura Lazar, Thomas R. LeVeck,
Thomas Lipton, James Evans Lipton,
Anne Looschen, Susan Nancy Lubin,
Frances Lyman, Barbara L. Lippincott,
Gary ). McIlvain, Linda McGowan.
Richard A. McGowan, Judith A. Mc-
George, Sharon McClellan, Ann Eliza-
beth Mayer, Elizabeth C. Mosier, Linda
McClellan, Linda Maurer, Mary Karen
Madden. Thomas Musson, Anthony
Malkowski, Norine Morrison, Beverly S.
Meyer, Barbara Ellen Morris, Helen
Meier, Margaret E. Mueller, Connie
Mitchell, David L. Miles.
Detroit Edison Scholarships: One De-
troit Edison Scholarship with stipend
of $350 is open to application by un-
dergraduate students. 'Applicants shall
be a resident of the State of Michi-
gan, shall have completed at least one
year of study in the University in a
field that relates to the electric util-
ity industry such as economics, ac-
counting, business and personnel ad-
ministration, and shall have an overall
average of at least 3.00. In selecting a
recipient, the following things will be
taken into account: scholastic ability,
character and personality, citizenship,
extracurricular activity, seriousness of
purpose, and financial need. Applica-
tions may be obtained at the Scholar-
ship Office, 2011 SAB. They should be
returned by Oct. 1.
Placement
The following schools have listed
teaching vacancies for the 1961-1962
school year.
Ann Arbor, Mich.-Nursery school po-
sition-begins October 1, 1961.
Birmingham, Mich. - Jr. HS Set.,
Math, English; HS Engl.
Caledonia, Mich.-Elem.; Indust. arts
(Mechanical Drawing, Shop).
Cass City, Mich.-HS Band.
For additional"information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3200 SAB,
NO 3-1511, Ext 3547.
(Continued on Page 4)

Companies should establish a}
unit that would handle the easingl
and tightening of credit conces-
sions in the business cycle; re-
search on products, new or dove-
tailed; regularization of inventory
and . investment, and full cycle1
planning to meet both boom andj
recession with stabilization, he ex-
plained.
The unsolved problem of these1
solutions is the availability of1
product and planning research to
the small and medium-sized com-'
panies. Because of their size, these
companies can less afford thesel
services and yet are the hardest1
hit by the effects of the business
cycle.,
Research in new products is vital
sto the economic life of the nation,s
and especially to Michigan as the
heart of United States industry,
Boyd pointed out. Flexibility is
needed to utilize these new pro-
Kennedy Appoints
Ross to FPA Seat
HYANNIS PORT-Former Uni-1
versity hockey captain Charles R.
Ross has been named to the Fed-
eral Power Commission by Presi-
'dent John F. Kennedy.
Ross, a Republican, is a native
of Middlebury, Vt. He was a mem-
ber of the hockey squad from
1939-41.
He has previously served on the
faculty of Oregon State College.
r i

Michigan, preoccupied with mass
production of automobiles, has
neglected the facilities for agres-
sive new product development at
a time when accelerated produc-
tion is essential for economic
health. I. S. T. is attempting to
meet this lack, he added.
If business is subject to govern-
ment control, then business should
have a voice in that government,
Hall concluded, speaking on the
need for "politically sophisticated"
businessmen.
To do this, they must be pre-
pared to take an active part in
politics, personally. "Businessmen
have to recognize politics as the
well-developed science of govern-
ment and not a necessary evil con-
ducted by shady, extra-curricular
characters."
DIAL NO 5-6290
* ENDING THURSDAY
Those two wonderful funny
stars of "Where the Boys
Are" Jim Hutton and Paula
'Prentiss are at it again in one
howl of a comedy!

11

Membership Meeting
and Folksing

Grad, said yesterday.
The exchange must be
cause the yellow cards
admit the student into
dium.

Thursday, Sept. 21
8:00 P.M. Union

made be-
will not
the sta-

Room 3 R'S

11

JOIN THE

Union Activities

Staff

I

J.

"q

i

"THE
HON EYMOON
MACHINE!"
Starring
Jim Hutton " Paula Prentiss
Steve McQueen
Brigid Bazzen
STARTING FRIDAY *

at the

gold bond
cleaners
Sy5E. William

l

Fcl

Open, House

'Not
to be
missed'
HARPERS BAZAAR

Thursday, Sept. 21 ... 4:15 or 7:00 P.M.

111

Ni

Odorless
Cleaning
correctly
finished
Free minor
repo irs
Free Moth-
proofig
Fast ServiCe

Third floor conference room

Ii

Dial
2-6264

ENDING
SATURDAY

PAUL NEWMAN

RAIEMOOMS RA&D! he
LAUIECEoi Afy aShRT
They had two wars to fight... the
one with the enemy- and onewih ah te
with each other!
x STARTING SUNDAY
"GENEVIEVE" also "TIGHT LITTLE ISLAND"

i

i

I

GILBERT arnd SULLIVAN.
Mass Organizational
Meeting
for
H.MS. Pinafore

MASONIC OCTOBER ONLY FOUR
AUDITORIUM 13, 14, 15 PERFORMANCES
/i
CIB

PROGRAMME
FRI., OCT. 13--8:20 P.M.-(All Tschaikovsky Program)
Swan Lake; Allegro Brillante;
Pas de Deux; Serenade
SAT., OCT. 14-8:20 P.M.

i

I

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan