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May 22, 1962 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-22

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'n

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

""

TUESDAY, MAY 22, 1962

TES COOPERATION:
Hatcher Gives Address
At College Dedication

By ROBERT SELWA

Special To The Daily
DEARBORN - University Pres-
ident Harlan Hatcher, speaking at
the dedication Sunday afternoon
of the Fairlane campus of Henry
Ford Community College, said the
new campus marks the continu-
ation of a "very significant pat-
tern."
This pattern, he said, is the co-
operation of community, industry
and education. ,
President Hatcher noted that
Henry Ford College is able to ex-
pand because of "devoted leader-
ship" of Dearborn citizens and
"substantial support" from indus-
try.
He added that the University's
Dearborn Center, which is across
from the new Henry Ford College,
also operates on the basis of co-
operation. Dearborn Center stu-
dents on co-op programs spend al-
ternate semesters studying and
working.
Set Example
"These two colleges are setting
an example in the academic
world" in working with industry,
the President commented.
He also cited the community

college's "close relationship" with
the Dearborn Center: joint com-
mittees help plan for both; they
share recreation facilities - ten-
nis courts, a quarter-mile track,
a baseball diamond; social activi-
ties are sometimes combined;
there is joint attendance at lec-
tures; and special counseling serv-
ice is available.
President Hatcher said that
Henry Ford College's "new and
beautiful campus" indicates that
Dearborn "intends to continue to
lead" in education.
Developing Countries
He suggested that the communi-
ty college type of schoolmay be
just what the developing countries
of the world need.
"This pattern, if we can export
it, might be a far greater contri-
bution to the underdeveloped
countries than the money we've
given so far," he declared.
President Hatcher's remarks
were underscored by Benson Ford,
president of the Ford Motor Co.
Fund. Ford said that both industry
and colleges can reach goals to-
gether that neither could have
reached alone..

1

LAST
3 DAYS

(cTTr1

Litlewood
Views Math
In England
By BETSEY KENYON
Mathematical education at
Cambridge used to be quite rigid,
Prof. J. E. Littlewood of England's
Trinity College said Thursday.
Viewing Cambridge's mathemat-
ics curriculum from 1860-1960,
Prof. Littlewood explained that the
English student attended lectures,
participated in a weekly session
with his tutor, and climaxed the
semester with a competitive final
exam.
+ Tripos
The fate of Cambridge math
students was determined by the
Tripos, an exam of three parts, he
said.
The second part was the vital
one, because passing it gave one a
degree. It was made up of ex-
tremely difficult problems in the
field, and at the end of the year
students usually went to coaches
six days a week in an effort to pass
it.
The announcing of the results in
the Senate House was an extreme-
ly important event.
Wooden Spoons
The bottom-ranking man was
given a huge wooden spoon. The
spoons have since lost their sig-
nificance and are today highly
prized collectors' items.
The exam was an excellent mea-
sure of mathematical ability, he
said. G. Polya, one of the most
outstanding mathematiciansmof
the century, was on campus at one
time and took the exam. He placed
fifth, said Prof. Littlewood.
Another year, six men who later
became prominent mathemati-
cians took the exam and none of
them received the top rating.
Women's Presence
Prof. Littlewood also noted the
consternation of some lecturers
over the presence of women in
their lecture at the time when the
various colleges were beginning to
co-operate and to allow women in.
One lecturer addressed his audi-
ence of two hundred and fifty wo-
men and one man as, "Sir," Prof.
Littlewood noted.
Another anthropology lecturer'
insisted that women attending his
lecture sit in the front row with
chaperones. He then proceeded to
give detailed accounts of atrocities
perpetrated on visiting women.
Prof. Littlewood said that Ox-
ford professors are required to give
forty-two lectures but at Cam-
bridge two are required. This
number is implied by the rule stat-
ing, "It is the duty of the profes-
sors to give lectures."
Prof. Littlewood, who has been
at Cambridge since 1908, collabor-
ated with G. H. Hardy on a real
and complex variable theory which
resulted in the founding of an in-
fluential school of English ana-
lysts, at the beginning of the cen-
tury.

Montgomery Discusses
Hollywood, Theatre, TV
nf0

New HQ in Town

--Daily-Jeffrey Fortune
ROMNEY ROLLS IN-The daughter of GOP gubernatorial hope-
ful George Romney, Detroit auto magnate, prepares to snip the
ribbon for the opening of the Ann Arbor headquarters of the
Bloomfield Hills industrialist. The opening was held Saturday.

STAGE INTER VIEW:

Park Plans
Indian Trip
For Group
By KATHERINE VOGT
Prof. Richard L. Park, of the po-
litical science department and di-
rector of the Center for Southern
Asian Studies, will begin a two-
year leave of absence from the
University in mid-June to go to
India.
As a representative of the Asia
Foundation in New Delhi, Prof.
Park will administer a program of
grants. The Asia Foundation pro-
vides grants in educational and
cultural fields primarily to indi-
viduals and small groups.
Distribute Books
One of the foundation's projects
is the assembling and distribution
of books to Asian students. Drives
to collect textbooks for Asian stu-
dents have been held on many col-
lege campuses including the Uni-
versity, Prof. Park said.
Numerous grants for research,
lecturing, and travel are made
available by the foundation to in-
dividuals who have constructive
contributions to make to their own
groups and societies in Asia. The
Asia Foundation also encourages
groups of artists and musicians
through grants.
Active Group
Although the foundation has
been active in most of Asia for the
past ten years, it was established
in India only a year ago.
During his two-year stay, Prof.
Park plans to tour the Indian sub-
continent, as wvell as do some lec-
turing. He previously lived in India
for about ten years.
'U' Announces
Year-Abroad
Participants
Nineteen University students
have been selected for a year's
study in France under the "junior
year abroad" joint program be-
tween the University and the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin.
Selection criteria included aca-
demic excellence, competence in
French, and ability to benefit from
a program in a foreign university.
Students chosen from the Uni-
versity are: Harriet Y. Liang, '64
A&D; Jurgen Klausenburger, '64;
Linda E. Pershing, 6'4; Patricia
Wilson, '64; Karen Kuivinen, '64;
Caroline Sharp, '64; Andrea J.
Hays, '64; Kathleen Mucha, '63;
Ellen J. Alexander, '64; Charles
Hix, '64; Mary T. Ginzler, '65;
Linda E. Pershing, '64; Patricia
Scholle, '64; Suzanne Levison, '64;
Judith E. Rubin, '64; Helen Mali-
kin, '64A&D; Peggy J. Meyers, '64;
Susan E. Sharron, '64; and John
S. Patterson, '64.

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By ELIZABETH ROEDIGER
The theater requires much more
from an actor than do motion pic-
tures, George Montgomery said
recently.
Montgomery, star of television
and movies and in Ann Arbor for
"Toys In The Attic," noted that in
Hollywood personality is often
more important than experience.
"If the story and director are
good they can make anyone look
as if he knows how to act," he
continued. Directing is really the
most creative part of motion pic-
tures, he said.
Straight Role
"I know I can play a nice little
straight role; I took to the stage
because here is where the great
material is," Montgomery said.
"I've had many offers for tele-
vision, but I don't care to go back
into a series," he said, noting that
an actor gets categorized easily
after a few years.
Program
Notes
The North American Air De-
fense Command Band will present
a concert under the auspices of
the music school at 8:30 p.m. to-
day in Hill Aud.
Band Concert.. .
The University Symphony and
Varsity Bands will give a concert
under the auspices of the music
school at 7:15 p.m. Wednesday
outdoors at Hill Aud. In case of
rain the concert will be held in-
doors at 8 p.m.
Degree Recital...
A degree recital by James Ed-
monds, pianist, under the aus-
pices of the music school will be
given at 8:30 p.m. Thursday in
Aud. A.
Baritone, Piano .. .
A faculty recital by Ralph Her-
bert, baritone, and Eugene Bos-
sart, pianist, will be presented at
8:30 p.m. on Friday in Aud. A.
Horn Clinic.
The Fourth Annual High School
Horn Clinic, under the auspices of
the music school will be given at
7:30 on Saturday in Hill Aud.
Burglar Takes
Photo' Supplies
A burglar broke into the house
of Lawrence Kramer, '62E, and
Daily photographer Edward Langs
'62, at 515 West Washington, tak-
ing photography equipment, lens-
es, and accessories valued in ex-
cess of $700.

Straight leading roles in West-
erns become very dull, Montgom-
ery noted.
"I have set my mind one the
theater. I would like to study for
a year under a good teacher,
basically as an exercise," he ex-
plained. "I start rehearsing 'The
Big Killing' next for the Summer
circuit in Canada; it is very suc-
cessful now in London, if it proves
of any value we may take it to
Broadway."
"Toys In The Attic" is a play
with challenge and excitement. "If
anything can prove ability, this
should," Montgomery said.
Short Rehearsal
But six days of rehearsal for it
"was not enough," an actor needs
weeks to get the feel of a play, he
noted.
This is one of many things re-
viewers fail to consider when view-
ing a play. They should not com-
pare everything to Broadway, he
added.
"Reviewers are strange; and
generally not constructive," Mont-
gomery said. It is for this reason
that most artists don't pay much
attention to them.
"I appreciate a constructive re-
view, but what I'm really after is,
my own self-satisfaction," Mont-
gomery concluded. "The most im-
portant thing is to have the audi-
ence like you."

DIAL 2-6264
Feature starts at
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:05 and 9:20
K ENDING WEDNESDAY
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WORLDS FAIR
November 16 and 17

NEW HOPE FOR ADDICTS
04 was earning $20,000 a
year," says a member of Gam-
blers Anonymous. "But my
wife and daughter lived like a
family on relief." In this
week's Post, you'll learn how
G.A. helps compulsive gam-
blers. And why most of them
really want to lose.

Monaural and Stereo
Opera, Broadway shows, pop vocal, jazz vocal,
comedy, plays, prose and poetry, folk music, docu-
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You name it, if it has the human voice in it-in
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THIS SALE INCLUDES DOMESTIC LABELS ONLY
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CHARGE ACCOUNT APPLICATIONS BEING TAKEN
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The Saturday Evening
POST
"MAY 26 ISSUE/NOW ON SALE

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Inquire at
Union Student Offices.

Wednesday,

3-5

HOURS: Mon. and Fri. 10-8:30
Tues.-Wed.-Thurs. 10-7 .. , Sat. 9-6

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ILILT'lNN

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1961-62 N. Y. CRITICS
VERNONRICE AWARD
"For outstanding achievement in theatre"

7q4

I

THE ASSOC. OF PRODUCING ARTISTS

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