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May 19, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-19

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THEMICHIGANDAILY

SATURDAY, MAY 19, 1962

FUTURE IMPORTANCE:
SRC Studies Attitudes On Fraternities

Flagpole Torn Down

By ANDREW ORLIN
The Survey Research Center has
dust completed a poll on "Under-
graduate Attitudes Toward Fra-
ternities."
Of the 1,000 forms sent to male
undergraduate students, members
and non-members of fraternities,
830 returned the completed ques-
tionnaires. These ,students an-
swered questions ranging from the
future importance of fraternities
in twenty years to the degree of
academic emphasis of these or-
ganizations.
The answers of the fraternity
men werecompared with the an-
swers of the male students not in
such organizations. There was also
a break-up into class in each of
these two groups.
Fraternity Decline
As students progressed from
.their freshman to their senior
years, there seemed to be a grow-
ing feeling that fraternities would
become less important in the next
twenty years.
Prof. Angus Campbell, Director
of the Survey Research Center,
noted that this is partially due to
the fact that the "University is
moving faster than the fraterni-
ties are. Fraternities were estab-
lished during a day of fun and
games, but today the University is
moving away from this," he added.
This definitely does not mean
that fraternities are suppressing
the academic atmosphere of the
campus. However, it may mean
that these organizations aren't
placing stress on them.

In all the questions concerning
the academic side of the frater-
nity, many of the senior members
expressed a dissatisfaction with
the academic advantages of the
organization. Although the num-
ber of affiliates who held this
opinion was usually in the minor-
ity, the group consistently grew
larger as these students advanced
from freshmen to seniors.
Louis Rice, Assistant to the
Dean of Men for Fraternity Af-
fairs, said, "the men who should
be impressed, the upper-classmen,
aren't."
He went on to say, "If fraterni-
ties are not convincing the gradu-
ating students of their value, then
in my opinion, there is something
wrong."
Not all the results were favor-
able, but as Prof. Campbell noted,
"IFC had consideragle courage in
exposing themselves to criticism
when they asked the Survey Re-
search Center to conduct the poll,
knowing beforehand that the re-
sults would become public."
Positive Side
Many of the questions showed
the positive side of the fraterni-
ties. In answer to a general ques-
tion concerning the overall bene-
fit of fraternities to campus life,
an overwhelming majority of the
affiliates responded in the affir-
mative while a substantial plur-
ality of the non-members agreed.
In addition, the survey ascer-
tained that the affiliates are more
active in the extra curricular ac-j

College Roundup
IOWA CITY - The Committee on the basis of their merits as in-
on Student Life voted last Tues- dividuals without restrictions' as
day to require all State Univer- to race, color or national origin."
sity of Iowa student organizations * * *
to file a copy of their constitu- ' POUGHKEEPSIE - Sarah Gib-
tions, bylaws and any other docu- son Blanding, president of Vas-
ments pertaining to membership sar College, recently told her stu-
regulations with the Office of Stu- dents that women who engage in
dent Affairs by Oct. 1, 1965, or lose premarital sex relations or exces-
official University recognition. sive drinking should leave college.
The resolution will now go to Women unwilling to "observe the
President Virgil Hancher for his standards should< withdraw, she
approval. said; otherwise they may be re-
The new rule reads: "It is the quested to do so.
policy of the University that local *
student organizations be able to CHAPEL HILL - University of
exercise free choice of members North Carolina Dean of Stu-
dent Affairs William G. Long an-
Pan- nounced last week that the schol-
astic restriction on fraternities
a and sororities was suspended by
Fund Chairman the Faculty Committee on frater-
nities and sororities in a unani-
Regent Eugene Power was ap- mous decision.
pointed as Ann Arbor chairman of The entire responsibility for
the 1962 United Negro College scholarship in the fraternities will
Fund campaign, Frank G. Arm- be on the IFC and each individual
strong, general chairman, an- fraternity.
nounced yesterday. Along with The new regulation came as a
Earl R. Cress as co-chairman, Re- result of a plan drawn up by the
gent Power will supervise solici- IFC in an effort to retain the ini-
tation of funds in the Ann Arbor tiative for self government by the
area. students.

tivities of the University than are
the independents.
Percentage wise, almost twice as
many fraternity men participate
in varsity athletics as compared
with non-fraternity men. However,
because of the relatively small
number of men in fraternities,
there are numerically more inde-
pendents participating on varsity
teams than affiliates.
Social Skills
There was a general concensus
among both groups that fraterni-
ties taught their members social
skillstandconfidence. Members of
fraternities were more socially
minded than non-members.
Prof. Campbell expected a high-
er amount of dating among fra-
ternity men, however, he was
slightly surprised at the numerical
results. A third of the non-mem-
bers report dating less than once
a month, while less than 10 per
cent of the affiliates date this in-
frequently. Over half of the fra-
ternity members say they date at
least once a week, a proportion
over twice as large as that of the
independents.
According to the survey, 98 per
cent of the fraternity men and
89 per cent of the independents
agreed that the fraternities should
have the right to restrict member-1
ship to persons of their own
choice. Concerning racialrestric-
tions, 57 per cent of the affiliates
and 44 per cent of the independ-
ents were in favor of leaving thisI
question up to the individual fra-1
ternities.
Prof. Campbell saw in the re-
sults of this question a belief by
many students that social organi-
zations should have the sole right'
to select their own members.
Descriptive Adjectives
One question asked the sampling
whether they would apply certain
descriptive adjectives to fraternity
men, to non-fraternity men, or to
neither. Both groups felt that the
word "well-dressed" applied to
fraternity men.
Sixty per cent of the affiliates'
and 40 per cent of the independ-
ents agreed that the word "indi-
vidualistic" was indicative of non-'
fraternity men. Such words as "af-
fected," "narrow-minded," and
"immature" were not felt to ap-
ply particularly to either group.1
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m., two days preceding
publication.
SATURDAY, MAY 19
General Notices
Commencement Instructions to Fac-
ulty Members: Convene ;at 4:15 p.m. in
the first floor lobby, Admin. Bldg. Buses
will be provided in front of the Admin.
Bldg. on State St. to take you to
the Stadium or Yost Field House to
join the procession and to take the
place assigned to you on stage, as
directed by the marshals; at the end
of the exercises buses will be ready in
driveway east of the Stadium or at
west side of Field House to bring you
back to the campus.
Distribution of Diplomas: If the
exercises are held A in the Stadium,
diplomas for all graduates except the
School of Dentistry, the Medical School,
and Flint College, will be distributed
from designated stations under the east
stand of the Stadium, immediately after
the exercises. The diploma distribution
stations are on the level above the
tunnel entrance
If the exercises are held in the
Yost Field House, all diplomas except
those of the School of Dentistry, the
Medical School, and Flint College, will
be distributed from the windows of the
Cashier's Office and the Registrar's
Office in the lobby, Admin. Bldg. Fol-
(Continued on Page 4)
ORGANIZATION

NOTICES
Congregational Disciples E & R Stu-
dent Guild, Picnic, May 19, 2:30 p.m.,
Meet at 802 Monroe for transportation
to Delhi Park.
Graduate Outing Club, Canoeing, May
20, 2 p.m., Rackham Bldg. Huron St.
Entrance.

-Daily-Jeffrey Fortune
RALLY ROUND THE FLAG-The flagpole near the Diag, a Uni-
versity tradition, was torn down yesterday because it was eaten
away by woodpeckers. Workers are setting up apparatus in prep-
aration for tearing it down.
ANN ARBOR QUARTERS:
Society To Move to City

Author Asks
U.S. To Push
Peace Race
By ROBERT SELWA
America has failed miserably in
Laos because she has not promot-
ed a peace race, Prof. Seymour
Melman of Columbia University
said.
Speaking at the third Voice Po-
litical Party Symposium on the
Arms Race, Prof. Melman, author
of "The Peace Race," described
his plan for a peace initiative as
consisting of four elements.
The first element is coopera-
tion, particularly in the arts and
sciences, but above all in disarma-
ment.
"We should ask what problems
will arise that President John F.
Kennedy and Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev want to cooperate on
in seeking a solution," Prof. Mel-
man said.
The second point is competition.
"The peace race would be a con-
test involving the expenditure of
creative effort in a gainful way,"
he commented.
The third and fourth elements
are the right of independent or-
ganization, a right trade unions
have enjoyed in America, and per-
sonal and political freedom of the
individual.
Prof. Melman envisioned a world
industrialized by the United States
and the Soviet Union, a world in
which the United States and the
Soviet Union would abandon mili-
tary expenditures to concentrate
all their efforts in economic devel-
opment.
"With our unlimited material
wealth, the United States cannot
lose a contest with the Soviet
Union in economic production," he
continued.
"The Soviet economy is stretch-
ed thin," he said.
Military strength has now be-
come unusable-it is a "pseudo
strength," Prof. Melman contin-
ued. America's real strength is in
being a center of industrial capi-
tal, in possessing an indefinitely
large confidence, in having tre-
mendous potential.
A peace race policy, he 'said,
would give the United States a
new moral lease on life. Full em-
ployment would finally come about
and women, for example, would
not have to panhandle a few
blocks away from Columbia Uni-
versity.

Thesauri Veiteris
FELIX A. PAPPALARDI, JR., Conductor
SUNDAY, MAY 20... 8:50 P.m.
HILL AUDITORIUM
A dmission Free
PROGRAM..S. OLOISTS. .

FOLKLORE SOCIETY PICNIC
AND FOLKSING
Saturday night, May 19 7.1
ISLAND PARK, B.Y.O.
Refreshments (No liquor)

4

4

Gabrieli
Telemann
Purcell
Pachelbel
Dencke
Mozart

Louis Stout
Willis Patterson
Gary Glaze
Walker Wyatt
Lavetta Loyd
Noel Papsdorf

The American Society for Micro-
biology will locate its national
headquarters in Ann Arbor begin-
ning July 1.
The society headquarters will be
moved from Grosse Pointe Woods
to a 2,000 square foot building
located in the Huron View Re-
search Park at the north edge of
the city.
Prof. Philipp Gerhardt of the
department of bacteriology and so-
SGC Adopts
NSA Motion
Student Government Council
adopted a motion Wednesday
night to allow students on the
Committee on the National Stu-
dent Association to attend NSA
regional and national conferences
when the quota is not filled by
Council members or standing com-
mittee chairman.
The Council also approved ap-
pointments to the Committee on
Membership in Student Organiza-
tions. Appointed are William Go-
mez, '62E, and Richard Young, '63,
for terms until the end of June,
1963, and Elizabeth Snow, '64, for
a term until the end of December,
1962.
Ten people petitioned in all. The
criteria for appointments were
factual information on the history
of the Committee and its relation-
ship to SGC, a minimal back-
ground in fraternity and sorority
systems and an ability to place
the Committee in coherent relative
context to the University, a Coun-
cil resolution said.
The Council also passed a mo-
tion to renew student health in-
surance from the Detroit nIsur-
ance Agency. The Detroit Agency
has submitted a plan which Coun-
cil has accepted which would re-
duce the student rate to $20.00, the
student-spouse rate to $55.00, and
the student-spouse-family rate to
$72.00. The maternity rate would
remain the same.
Roberts Talks
On Integration
"We are shirking our responsibil-
ity as citizens if we do not concern
ourselves with the problems of in-
tegration," John M. Roberts, vice-
chairman of Voice Political Party,
said to those assembled at a forum
held by that group on Thursday.
The talk was part of a celebra-
tion of the eighth anniversary of
the Supreme Court's Brown vs.
Board of Education school deseg-
regation case.
"Many Negroes face violence and
economic sanctions when they try
to claim their equal rights," Rob-
erts said. He pointed out that the
integration movement is as strong
as it was iz the past.
Groups like the Student Non-
Violent Coordinating Committee
and Congress on Racial Equality
are still carrying4on worthwhile
programs, he contended.

ciety secretary said that one prime
reason for the move was the gen-
eral image of science and qual-
ity which is associated with the
city and the University.
Science Libraries
"Substantial scientific libraries,
efficient printing companies, good
communications, the attractive
residential area and the cultural
assets of the community also fig-
ured prominently in the decision,"
he added.
The society works to promote
scientific research by publishing
five journals and various books.
It also plans, administers and or-
ganizes projects for the advance-
ment of knowledge in the field.
Prof. Gerhardt pointed out that
there will be employment oppor-
tunities with the society in the
areas of editorial, clerical, steno-
graphic and bookkeeping person-
nel.
Society's Books
The books published by the so-
ciety have world-wide distribution
and serve as the' representative of
the United States in the micro-
biology field, he said.
Prof. Gerhardt said that the so-
ciety is publishing more works and
has utilized the facilities of a lo-
cal printing concern in the past.
The society hopes to increase its
membership to some 8,500 mem-
bers within the next five years,
Prof. Gerhardt explained.
The society's executive secre-
tary is R. W. Sarber, who along
with Robert A. Day.managing edi-
tor, will be relocated to the new lo-
cal headquarters in the Huron
View building, which is being com-
pletely remodeled for the society.

Full Chamber Orchestra, Chorus
Brass Ensemble

1 i
Cinema "ui1
Tonight and Sunday at 7 and9
tI
Robert Louis Stevenson s
THE B ODY SNATCHER.
Boris Karloff, Bela Lugosi,
Henry Daniell
Plus: COMEDY PROGRAM-
Cuckoo Waltz, Pow Wow, Buster Keaton short
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

IF

We o re now
Delivering
PIZZA and SUBS
DOMIK
No 2-541

I

CC ME i

(0

ON

hrr

Feature starts -6DIAL
at 1:00-3:00-5:00 6264
t17:05 and 9:20
HE UMSED LOE UKE
IMOWME14 USE MONIV
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER presents/
PAUL NEWMAN- GERALDINE PAGE
SAS om W

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning Prayer on first Sunday of
month.)
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month.)I
7:00P.M. Evening Prayer.
TUESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communior followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House
(over in time for 8:0J0 classes)
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion followed by
lunch at the Canterbury House.
WEEKDAYS--
5:15 P.M. Daily Evening Prayer.

LUTHERAN STUD
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran t
Hill Street at S. For
Henry 0. Yoder, Pa
Miss Anna M. Lee,+
Phone: NO 8-7622
Sun
9:30 Worship Service
11:00 Worship Service
3:00 P.M. Meet at the
FIRST CHURCH C
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw A
1 1 :00 a.m. Sunday Ser
8:00 p.m. Wednesda'
9:30 a.m. Sunday Sc
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday Sc
6 years of age.)
A free reading room is
Liberty St. Readingl
thru Saturday 10:0
Sundays and Holi
7:00 to 9:00.

ENT CENTER FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
Council State and Huron Streets, Tel. 8-6881
est Ave. Dr. Hoover Rupert Minister
stor Rev. Eugene A. Ransom, Campus Minister
Counselor Rev. Jean Robe, Associate Campus Minister
9:00 and 11:15 A.M. Morning Worship.
day "Priced for the World," Dr. Rupert
preaching.
and Communion 7:00 P.M. Worship and Program.
e Center for a picnic. MONDAY
12:00 noon-Student Cabinet luncheon, Pine
Room.
)F CHRIST, TUESDAY
5:10 P.M. Church Related Vocations, supper
in the Pine Room,
ye. 8-11 P.M. Open House, Jean Robe's
rvices. apartment.
y Services. WEDNESDAY
hool (up to 20 years of 7:00 A.M. Holy Communion, Chapel. Break-
fast. Pine Room.
hool (for children 2 to THURSDAY
7:30 P.M. Kappa Phi.
maintained at 306 East FRIDAY
Room hours are Monday 4:00 P.M. Wesley Foundation Annual Meet-
(0 a.m. to 5 p.m. except ing, Board of Directors and Student Cabinet
days. Monday evening meet with Bishop Marshall R. Reed for
program and dinner. Social Hour.
5:45 P.M. Wesley Grads, dinner in Pine Room.

C*NM ETR " OCoioR

Provocative Adult
Entertainment!

4~1 ii i

DIAL 8-6416
Shows at 7 and 9 p.m.

"ONE OF BERGMAN'S "POWERFUL"
MOST POWERFUL - "Y.rim"
FILMS!
Harriet Anderson
is spellbinding!"
-Life Magazine A G0
ACADEMY AWARD
BEST FOREIGN FILM
OF THE YEAR
2nd Big Week!
Aa demy A ward Winner;
Exclusie specialEagagpef gBest Actor!
NO RE$ERVED SEAT$1 Maximilan Schel
3 PERFORMANCES DAILY! Best Screenplay!
Abby Mann

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J~y
ILEAG Ut
GARDEN CAFIE
Refreshments available
FRESH FRUIT
POTATO CHIPS
COOKIES

i

THE EVANGELICAL UNITED
BRETHREN CHURCH
Corner of Miller and Newport
John G. Swank, Pastor
Telephone NOrmandy 3-4061
Church School 10:00 A.M.
Morning Worship 1 1:00 A.M.

CAMPUS CHAPEL
Washtenaw at Forest
The Reverend Leonard Verduin, Postor
Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan
10:00 A.M. Worship Services
1 1:15 A.M. Coffee Hour
7:00 P.M. Vesper Worship Service
ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
1420 Hill Street
Herbert Nichols, Clerk
Anthony and June Bing, House Directors
NO 2-9890
SUNDAY MORNING
10:00 A.M. Sunday School, Adult'Discussion,
Worship-Fellowship.
11:00 A.M. Meeting for Worship.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Thomas Park, Vicar

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THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756
10:00 A.M. Bible School.
1 1:00 A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY d
7:30 P.M. Bible Study.
C - - -11 K% ti n Ac99 ,

Sunday at 9:45 and 11 :15: Worship Servi
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible Study Gr
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta Supper-Prod
Sermon by the Vicar, "Faithfulness in Li
Wednesday at 8:15: Chapel Assembly.
Wednesday at 10:00 P.M. Midweek Devo
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Kloudt, Postor

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