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May 18, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-18

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'AGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

AGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

BUDGET, SURVEYS:
Administrators, Deans
Prepare for Trimester

(Continued from Page 1)
hopes that student opinion would
be considered" in decisions re-
garding trimester.
Predict Popularity
In general, the students con-
tacted were "highly favorable"
towards year-round operation, the
report found.
Three suggestions were repeat-
edly made: few laboratory courses
should be offered, unless they take
place outdoors; large lecture
courses should be given all three
semesters; more experimental
courses requiring non-classroom
work should be offered.
The women also recommended
that the three semesters be as
much alike as possible; that "at-
tempts should be made to have
visiting professors and specialized
Peace Corps
To Interview
U' Candidates
University students interested in
possible Peace Corps service are
invited to meet with two Peace
Corps representatives from 6 p.m.
to 11 p.m. today at the Tuller Ho-
tel in Detroit.
The Corpsmen will discuss projf-
ects planned for this summer in
Africa, Latin America, the Near
East and the Far East. They will
answer questions about the Corps,
interview candidates for specific
projects to begin training this
summer, present a slide series of
Corps activities and help appli-
cants fill out questionnaires.
Candidates who wish to apply
for summer projects must file their
applications, immediately. Gener-
ally they will be notified within
four weeks about the status of
their application.

programs during each semester to
stimulate year-round attendance";
that there should be leeway in
choice of professor, time and avail-
ability of the course, with the
necessary information provided
"at least two semesters" in ad-
vance.
Preport Percentage
Another finding of this survey
substantiates a belief of most of
the deans: that graduate and up-
perclass students will make much
fuller use of the trimester system.
The report stated that a smaller
percentage of freshman and soph-
omore women would attend a
summer session, as they would
rather use this time for work or
vocation in lieu of studies.
Faculty mernlers also point out
that graduate students are more
tied down to the University. Most
are married and live in Ann Arbor.
The majority must use campus fa-
cilities year-round to prepare for
their doctorates. Many have re-
search grants that necessitate con-
tinuous study.
Prof. Spurr adds a final fact:
"There are already about 6,000
students attending year-round,"
most of them in the graduate
schools.
Participation Problem
But, in spite of all the compli-
cations--budget problems, uncer-
tainty as to faculty and student
participation-Prof. Spurr believes
that full-year operation is inevit-
able, even if it is sidetracked next
year.
He points out that the number
of college-age students within the
state will approximately double
within the next 10 years, thus
portending for the future a tre-
mendous increase in the demands
upon higher education facilities.
Prof. Spurr adds, the University
"is keeping itself flexible" so that
it does not commit itself yet on the
immediate future of the full-year
calendar. ;

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Set Camus
As Subject
Of Reading
By JEAN TENANDER
Within the next few weeks thet
SGC Summer Reading Committee
will be sending letters to all enter-t
ing freshmen urging them to read
Camus between now and next fall.
After discussing possible books
and authors to be the subject ofT
seminars held in the fall, the com-
mittee decided that on the basis
of universality and general appealj
an author like Camus would best
answer the program's needs.
The suggested novels will be
"The Plague," "The Fall," and a
group of short stories, "Exile inj
the Kingdom." "The Stranger"j
was omitted from the list because
so many students at the freshman c
level are already familiar with it.
Student Sponsored
The program which is sponsored
entirely by Student Government
Council was initiated in 1958 un-
der the direction of Roger Season-
wein, Grad. Seasonwein had broad
plans for the reading group and
they began with an interdisciplin-
ary discussion of the 1920's.
In 1959 there was no summer
reading and the interested stu-
dents met in the Honors Lounge
at the Undergraduate Library
for informal discussions. Last year
a new program was started and a
series of five seminars were held
to discuss Dostoievski's "Crime
and Punishment." The general
feeling on the committee is that
last year's program was a success.
This can be attributed primarily
to the fact that the planning was
done more realistically than pre-
viously and took into consideration
the limits inherent in any attempt
to discuss a weighty work of liter-
ature in only five or six meetings.
Lively Response
The program attempts to select
books of importance which are
currently being discussed and
which will evoke a lively response
from the students attending the
seminars. There is an effort to
remove the aura of the classroom
by stressing the informality and
encouraging spontaneous partici-
pation.
Advisors for the committee are
Prof. Marston Bates of the zo-
ology department; Prof. Herbert
Barrows of the English depart-
ment; and Prof. John Higham of
the history department. Students
working on the committee are
Roger Lowenstein, '64, chairman;
Michael Maidenby, '64; Wallis
Wilde, '64; and Judith Abrams, '64.
U' To Present
Midwest Music
Compositions'
The Music School will host the
Midwestern Student Composers'
Symposium today and tomorrow in
a program consisting of five pres-
entations by musical groups from
four universities.
The opening program features
works by Robert Newell from the
University of Illinois, Louis Coy-
ner from State University of Iowa,
Randolph Coleman from North-
western University, and Robert
James, Grad, and Arthur Hunkins,
Grad, from the University.
Prof. Josef Blatt, conductor of
the University Symphony Orches-
tra, and David Sutherland, Grad,
will conduct the University Sym-
phony Orchestra in the program
which begins at 8:30 p.m. in Hill
Aud.

Four chamber concerts will be
given under the direction of the
composers on Saturday.
At 10:00 a.m. the State Univer-
sity of Iowa will be heard in Aud.
A; at 1:00 p.m. the University of
Illinois and at 8:30 p.m., North-
western University will be heard
there.
The University program, which
includes several large ensembles,
will be presented at 3:00 in Hill
Aud.
At the end of each of the four
Saturday concerts, a panel of four
will discuss the compositions.
The panel members, representa-
tives of the participating schools,
are Richard Hervig of the State
University of Iowa; Benjamin
Hohnston of the University of Il-
linois; Anthony Donato of North-
western University; and George
Wilson, lecturer in composition of
the Music School.

(Continued from Page 1)

STUDENT, FACULTY:
Set Conference Assignments

ence by students, faculty members,I
and administrators.I
Although specific discussiont
topics have not yet been disclosed,
workshop groups, all meeting inI
the Union, have been announced
as follows: -
Workshop GroupsI
Workshop A: Friday, NE corner, Ball
room; Saturday, Rm. 3K-Co-leaders:I
Assistant Director of Admissions Byron
R. Groesbeck and David Hoekenga, '64;I
Delegates: Regent Irene E. Murphy of'
Birmingham, Assistant Dean of Men for
Scholarships Ivan Parker, Associate Di-
rector of Admissions G.' C. Wilson,r
Charles S. Kennedy of Detroit, Profes-
sors Carl Cohen of the Dearborn Cen-
ter, Wyeth Allen of the engineering col-
lege, Paul M. Spurlin of the French de-
partment, Walter Nungester of the
Medical School, Lyle Cralne of the nat-
ural resources school, Bridget Curran,1
'64, Anees Jung, Grad, Bart Burkhalter,
Grad., Union Administrative Vice-Pres-
ident Albert Acker, '63, and Jeffrey
Shopoff, '65.-
. * * *
Workshop B: Friday, SE corner, Ball-
room; Saturday, Rm. 3L.-Co-leaders:
Prof. Merwin H. Waterman of the busi-
ness school and James Seder, '64L.
Delegates: Regent Paul G. Goebel of
Grand Rapids, University Executive
Vice-President Marvin L. Nehuss, Di-
rector of University Relations Michael
K. Radock, Rep. Gilbert E. Bursley (R-
Ann Arbor), Howard J. Mersereau of
Niles, Professors Allen Menlo of the
education school, Alfred C. Raphelson
of the Flint College, John Henderson of
the Medical School, John H. Romani of'
the public health school, Norman C.
Thomas of the political science depart-
ment, Daily Acting City Editor Michael
Harrah, '64BAd., John Utley, '64, Fred
Russell Kramer, '63, and Barry Litvin,
'64.
Workshop C: Friday, SW corner, Ball-
room; Saturday, Rm. 3M. Co-leaders:
Pool Causes
Co ntrov ersy,
Shakes Tyler
(Continued from Page 1)
The next to take part in the dis-
cussion was Gary Bennett, '62
Grad., Assistant Resident Advisor
of Tyler-Prescott and a recognized
authority on bacteriology. He put.
forth the salient fact that the pool
as it stood was unsanitary.
In agreement with University
experts in the field, he said that
algae should be kept out and cer-
tain temperature and pH levels
should be maintained, among oth-
er things. He added that as it now
stood the pool was a violation of
state health regulations.
There ensued further arguing
between Walter and Cohen, with
Bennett getting a point in wher-
ever he could. It was moved that
the pool be closed pending health
department approval, but this
failed. This was the final insult
for Cohen, who resigned forthwith.
Moon Asserts Joke
Soon thereafter, Harold Moon,
Grad., regretted his part in the
original dinner table move, which
he said had been a joke, and sub-
mitted in turn his own resignation.
The meeting might still be rag-
ing, had not Bennett declared that
the house resident adviser had
banned further use of the debris-
littered, bacteria-laden pool. This
seemed to be a calming influence
on the council (although not on
the residents who had been laugh-
ing heartily throughout the entire
fiasco).
Remain to Adjourn.
The session lasted only -long
enough after that to adjourn. Two
or three members went out to si-
phon the water from the pool -
which, of course, had been stand-
ing filled in the courtyard all the
while the council was arguing
whether or not to buy a pool -
and various other Tyler-Prescott
men stood around discussing what
had transpired at what may easily
prove to be the biggest example
of "heat madness" to occur in Ann
Arbor thus far.

Prof. Andrew DeRocco of the chemistry
department fnd Union Executive Vice-
President Jon Carlson, '63. Delegates:
Regent Eugene B. Power of Ann Arbor,
University President Harlan Hatcher,
Co-ordinator of the Office of Religious
Affairs DeWitt C. Baldwin, Dr. Joseph
Barkley, Professors Leigh C. Anderson
of the chemistry department, Brymer
Williams of the engineering college,
Henry Austin of the speech department,
Philip Jay of the dentistry school, Ad-
ministrative Dean Robert Williams,
Haruki Tsuchiya, Grad., Mark Chesler,
Grad., Leilant Straw, Flint College,
Panhellenic President Ann McMillan,
'63, and Richard Haken, Grad.
* * *
workshop D: Friday, NW corner, Ball-
room; Saturday,- Rm. 3N. Co-leaders:
Prof. Charles Lehmann of the education
school and Union President Robert
Finke, '63. Delegates: Regent Allan R.
Sorenson of Midland, Vice-President for
Student Affairs James A. Lewis, Assist-
ant Dean of Women Elizabeth Leslie,
Director of the Office of Religious Af-
fairs C. Grey Austin, Mrs. Norris A.
Host, Professors Russell A. Dodge of
the engineering college, Eugene Fein-
gold of the political science department,
William C. Kelly of the geology depart-
ment, Katherine Ford, '64, Jurgen
Gliss, '64L, Richard Soel, '62, Wallace
Wilde, '64, and Michael Olinick, '63.
Workshop E: Room 3R. Co-leaders:
Prof. Claude Eggertson of the education
school and Robert Rosin, Grad. Dele-
gates: Regent Carl Brablec of Roseville,
Director rofResearch Administration
Robert Burroughs, Director of Univer-
sity Libraries Frederick C. Wagman,
Acting Director of the Institute for
Science and Technology James Wilson,
Professors Robert Mills and Paul W.
McCracken of the business school, Wil-
liam G. Dow of the engineering college,
George Mendenhall of the Near Eastern
studies department, Dorin Hinerman
of the Medical School, James N. Spuhler
of the anthropology department, Rich-
ard Fuller, '62, William Krebs, '63, Rob-
ert Ross, '63, Edwin Sasaki, Grad., and
Ralph Kaplan, '63.
Workshop F: Em. 3S. Co-leaders: Di-
rector of the Honors Council Otto C.
Graf and Ruth Galater, '63. Delegates:
Regent Frederick C. Matthaei of Ann
Arbor, Student Government Council
Administrative Secretary Jean Spencer,
Professors George Hempel of the busi-
ness school, Lawrence Maugh of the en-
gineering college, Frank 0. Copley of
the classical studies department, How-
ard M. Ehrmann of the history depart-
ment; Arnold Kaufman of the phil-
osophy department, William LeVeque
of the mathematics department, Charles
M. Davis of the geography department,
Thomas Brown, '63BAd., Margaret
Skiles. '63, Judith Oppenheim, '63, Nan-
cy Nasset, '63, and Fred Riecker, '63.
Workshop G: Room 3C. Co-leaders:
Dean of the architecture college Her-
bert W. Johe and Roger Wolthuis, '62.
Delegates: Regent William K. McInally
of Jackson, Assistant to the Vice Pres-
ident for Business and' Finance John
G. McKevitt, Assistant Dean of Men for
Housing John Hale, Manager of Service
Enterprises Francil C. Shiel, Professors
Ross Cowan of the Dearborn Center,
Marvin Eisenberg of the history of art
department, John Gosling of the Medi-
cal School, Associate Dean of the lit-
erary college James H. Robertson, Asso-
ciate Dean of the music school John
Flower, John Karls, '64, Inter-Quad-
rangle Council President Robert Geary,
'63, Gerald Storch, '64, Interfraternity
Council President John Meyerholz,, '63.
Workshop H: Room 3D. Co-leaders:
Prof. Marvin Feiheim of the English
department and R. Andrew Hawley,
Grad. Delegates: Superintendent of
Public Instruction Lynn. M. Bartlett,
Vice-President for the Dearborn Center
William E. Stirton, Associate Dean of,
the business school Dick A. Leabo, Pro-
fessors Joseph Crafton of the Dearborn
Center, Lowell W. Beach of the educa-
tion school, Malcolm Lowther of the
education school, Wilbur C. Nelson of
the engineering college, Theodore Gish'
of the German department, Frederick E.;
Smith of the zoology department, Victor
Perera, Grad., Elaine Wender, '63, Rich-
ard Magidoff, '63, Barbara Perlman, '62,
and Stephen Landau, '64.

Workshop I: Rm. 3. Co-leaders: Prof.
James C. O'Neill of the French depart-
ment and Pat Golden, '63. Delegates:
Vice-President for Academic Affairs and
Dean of the literary college Roger w.
Heyns, Prof. Fred L. Black of the busi-
ness school, Sidney Warschausky of the
Dearborn Center, John S. Brubacher
and Allan 0. Pfinster of the education
school, G. J. Van Wylen of the engineer-
ing college, Clarivel Baird of the speech
department, Louis L. Orlin of the as-
tronomy department, John Weller of
the Medical School, Lynn Lopata, '62,
Harry Perlstadt, '63, Simon Klien, '63,
and Pat McKee, '63L.
. . *
Workshop J: Rm. 3Y. Co-leaders: As-
sistant Dean of Men John Bingley and
Philip Sherman, '62. Delegates: Regent
Donald M. D. Thurber of Detroit, Alum-
ni Association General Secretary John
H. Tirrell, H. M. Wilson of the Alumni
Association, Director of Registration
Edward Groesbeck, Dean of the engi-
neering college S S. Attwood, President
of the Senate Charles Sawyer, Director
of the McMath-Hulbert Observatory
Richard Teske, Prof. K. L. Jones of
the botany department, Caroline Dow,
'63, SGC Executive Vice-President How-
ard Abrahms, '62, SGC Administrative
Vice-President Richard G'sell, '63E,
Kenneth Miller, '64, and Antony She-
baya, Grad.
Workshop K: Rm. Z. Co-leaders: Sen-
ior Psychiatric Counselor Mrs. Mary Le-
More and Nancy Prime, '63. Delegates:
Secretary of the University Erich Walter,
Dean of Men Walter B, Rea, Acting
Dean of Women Elizabeth P. Davenport,
Director of the International Center
James Davis, Herman Jacobs of the,
Office of Religious Affairs, Professors
Edward S. Bordin of the psychology
department, William E. Howard of the
astronomy department, Ralph C. Fletch-
er of the social work school, Susan
Farrell, '62, Lois Fisher, '64, Nancy
Press, '64, Fred Battle, '61, and Paul
Snowman, Grad.
Group o Hold
Speech,. Dance
"Dance, Paint, Chisel Stone,
Write a Play!" a lecture and dance
interpretation, will be presented
at 8:00 p.m. today in the First
Baptist Church Fellowship Hall.
Rev. Malcolm Boyd of Wayne
State University will read a paper
on the relationship of theology to
the arts. Members of the Wayne
State Dance Workshop will illus-
trate these points. The program is
being presented by the Christian
Federation Advisors and the
groups which they represent.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
Baha'i Student Group, Discussion:
Baha'i Scriptures, May 18, 8 p.m., 418
Lawrence.
Christian Federation Advisors, Mal-
colm Boyd & Workshop from Wayne,
Lecture & dance interpretations, 8 p.m.,
1st Baptist Church.
* * *
Congr. Disc. E & R Guild, Picnic, May
19, 2:30 p.m., Meet at 802 Monroe for
transportation to Delhi Park.
Newman Club, Dance, May 18, 8:30
p.m., 331 Thompson; Grad. Dinner-
Entertainment-Everyone Welcome, May
20, 6:30 p.m., 331 Thompson.
Wesleyan Foundation, Young Married
Group Picnic, 5:30 p.m., Wesley Lounge;
Grad, Supper, 6:45 p.m., Pine Room;
May 18.

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