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May 09, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

D SDAY., F 9. 1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY. MAY 9. 1962

HIGH SCHOOL DEBATES:
Flint, Mt. Pleasant

I

W in

By MYRNA ALPERT t
First place in the 45th annualt
state championship debates of thet
Michigan High School Forensic
Association held last week went toX
Flint Northern High School in thet
"A" Division and to Mt. Pleasantt
Sacred Heart Academy in the "B"I
Division.
Both teams represented the!
negative side of the subject: re-
solved - "That the Federal gov-1
ernment should equalize educa-t
tional opportunity by means and
grants to the states 'for public ele-
mentary and secondary educa-
tion."t
The affirmative team in class
"A" Division was from JacksonK
High School and the one in thet
class "B" Division represented
Saginaw St. Mary Cathedral High
School.
Jackson Team
The Jackson team defined thei
equality of educational opportu-
nity as every child having the
chance to fully develop his own
talents. They then went on to de-t
fend their stand that the state
and local communities do not and
can not adequately provide for the
education of migrant workers't
children and those in slum areas.
The negation from Flint North-
ern named projects that were al-
ready underway in Colorado, Ore-
gon, and Pennsylvania in which
the states have made rapid strides
toward equalizing the education of
migrant workers' children with
those who have a settled resi-
dence.
They feel that the resources for
such activities all over the coun-

try can come from a reassessment
of property values, thus raising
the taxes on them.
They showed that the successful
programs all used the money to
improve the cultural environment
of the children rather than just
improve the facilities in the
schools.
The class "B" affirmative team
from Saginaw St. Mary Cathedral
High School argued that "inequali-
ties in education exist from finan-
cial inequalities of the states.
Quote Reports
They quoted reports showing
that states which have a shortage
of qualified teachers also have an
average teacher income lower
than the mean for the country.
They suggested a plan in which

CompetitionE
each state would set up a research
commission to study the way in
which its finances were being em-
ployed and to offer plans for put-
ting them to more efficient use.
Then after the states helped
themselves as much as possible,
they could apply for federal aid
for education.

Ending
Thursday

"Disney does it again-A fast-moving riotous comedy of a
timely subject, replete with witty dialogue."-Times

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Purchasing Power
The negative team from Mt.
Pleasant Sacred Heart Academy
showed that in states where teach-
er's salaries are low, the cost of
living is also low. This makes the
purchasing power of the individual
fairly equal in all areas.

Wait Disdn
Friday: "Judgment

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* -4
*
t~ at Nuremberg"

.

I

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VOCAL OCTET-The members of the Friars, standing from left to right, are Sam Carter, '63;
Ralph Helzerman, '64; Roger Sergeant, Grad; Leonard Riccinto, '63SM; Don Cole, '64; Ron Jeffers,
'65SM; Brook Stanford, '63 and Steve Jones, '64. They will appear May 12 at the annual spring Glee
Club concert in Hill Aud.
Friars trace Originfrom Wine to Song

Church Reception
To Honor Nzeribe
Benjamin Nzeribe, a member of
the Nigerian federal parliament,
will be honored at a reception at
4:30 p.m. today at the Unitarian
Church. The function is open to
the public.

Continuing tonight. ..
on the new semi-Elizabethan stage of the
Trueblood Auditorium, Frieze Building, the
rarely produced Shakespearean classic

I
i1

By JEFFREY K. CHASE
The name "Friars," originally
designating a Michigan drinking
club, is now attached to the noted
Michigan vocal octet, said Steven
Jones, '64, first tenor and treasur-
er of the Friars.
In the late nineteenth century
a group of University students
formed a social drinking club
which they called the Friars. After
this +uasi-fraternity disbanded in
the latter decade of this century,
the name Friars lay dormant until
1955 when Dr. Walter Collins of
Yale University founded a small
ensemble composed of University
Men's Glee Club members who
adopted the name "Friars" for
their organization.
Self-Sustaining
The Friars are self-sustaining.
Being a member of the University's
Men's Glee Club is the only pre-
requisite for trying out for the
Friars. The Glee Club neither
gives them monetary support nor
interferes with their tryouts.
The Friars' extensive repertoire
encompasses many vocal forms,
from barbershop, to modern, to
novelty, to rock 'n roll, Jones ex-
plained.
Last February the Friars sang
at colleges in Washington State
and have already been ,invited
back for a performance next year.
They will be giving a concert in
Kansas City in the middle of May.
Brook Stanford, '63, president and
first tenor, explained that the
Friars have many such invitations,
but, due to academic commit-
ments at the University, they are
unable to accept.

The Friars do most of their per-
froming at university fraternity
and soroity social events, and
functions in southern Michigan.
Most of the Friars' arrange-
ments are original. Ronald Jeffers,
'65SM, second tenor, and Leonard
Riccinto, '63 SM, baritone, are the
chief arrangers.
The Friars plan to make a rec-
ord next fall to augment the col-
lection of songs on their present
disc, "Fun With the Friars."
Travel Extensively
In their capacity as accompany-
ing ensemble to The Men's Glee
Club, the Friars have traveled

from coast to coast, have toured
throughout Europe, and have ap-
peared on radio and television.
Their varied audiences respond
cordially and appreciatively to
their humor and harmony, Stan-
ford noted.
The Friars are always given a
spot at the Glee Club concerts, and
this Saturday is no exception.
They will appear on May 12 at the
annual spring concert in Hill Aud,
The other Friars are Donald
Cole, '64, second tenor, Roger Ser-
geant, G, baritone, Ralph Helzer-
man, '64, bass, and Sam Carter,,
'63, bass and business manager.

ASHAWAY VANTAGE
For Tournament Play
Approx. Stringing Cost
Tenns .........$9

HENRY

IV

Fraser Infers Failure
Of Alliance for Progress

By ROBERT SELWA
The Alliance for Progress is fail-
ing.
This is the impression Steven
Fraser, Grad., received at a recent
conference on Latin America held
at Oberlin College.
"The Alliance is falling apart,"
he commented Monday. "It's miss-
ing the mark.
Rapid Progress
"The Latin Americans want
rapid progress and the Alliance
for Progress is slow. The Alliance's
funds are committed to non-pro-
ductive means that could have
been taken care of by the people."
Fraser cited housing and edu-
cation. He said local capital should

TONIGHT
Le mouton a cinq pattes

be used for building houses and
schools, and that United States aid
ought to go to promoting industry.
But "powerful economic pres-
sure groups" in Washington pre-
vent this more valid type of aid
because of the possibility of com-
petition with American capitalists,
he added.
Primrose Path
"And these vested interests in
Washington are likely to lead
America down the primrose path
of destruction," Fraser asserted.
He noted that the Alliance for
Progress is known among Latin
Americans as "the Castro plan"
because it came about as a re-
sponseto Fidel Castro's Cuban.
revolution.
"Latin Americans do not regard
Castroism as Communism, "Fraser
explained. "They regard it as a
unique brand of socialism, com-
pletely indigenous to Cuba: And
this is its appeal to Latin Amer-
ica."
Accommodation With Cuba
Fraser said that for the United
States to be more successful in
Latin America, it needs to achieve
an accommodation with Cuba,
with both countries making con-
cessions.
The United States also needs to
push social change more force-
fully, Fraser suggested.
"How many revolts and revolu-
tions in Latin America do you hear
about calling for slow change and
free enterprise?" he added.
Thornton To Talk
On 'Colonialism'
Prof. A. P. Thornton of the Uni-
versity of Toronto history depart-
ment will speak on "Colonialism,"
at 4:15 p.m. today in Aud. C. The
talk is being sponsored by the his-
tory department.

'U' Stations
Win Awards.
For Series
The University was presented
with three awards for its work in
radio and television by the Insti-
tute for Education by Radio and
Television last Friday in Columbus,
Ohio.
In radio, station WUOM re-
ceived a First Award on the re-
gional level for its series "Classi-
cal Drama."' This series gave mod-
ern translations of six ancient
Greek plays. The series was cited
for its superior acting, directing,
production, "heightened by the
creative efforts of an excellent mu-
sic faculty."
For its work in television the 'U'
Television Center won a First
Award on the local level for its
series 'Legacy.' This series, a study
of man's cultural, learning, and
traditional heritage, was recog-
nized for its blending of narration,
music, and dramatic vignettes, its
use of special effects, its writing,
and its professional calibre per-
formance.
The Television Center also re-
ceived a first award on the local
level for its program 'The Art of
Story Telling'.
lAyyangar To Tel
Of Indian Music
"South Indian Classical Music,"
a lecture-demonstration, will be
presented at 8:30 p.m. today at
Rackham Lecture Hall. Rangara-
manuja Ayyangar, guest artist,
will present the program.
STARTING
SUNDAY
THE BESTFILM OF
S THEYEARNat'I Board of Review 1.
- e EOTA~CAE

ASHAWAY PRO-FECTED
For Club Play
Approx. Stringing Cost
Tennis ........... $7
Badminton.. .. .. $6

I

the University Players, Dept.

seating remains for this evening's performance, while

PART TWO
presented at 8:00 p.m. through Saturday, evening by

of Speech.

best seating

for -other

evenings is held

by

season

subscribers. Box office open daily 1-8.
Tickets from $1.00

w

I12- '- -' i

Excellent

avec

FERNANDEL

French dialogue with English sub-titles
UGLI Multipurpose Room 8:00
Sponsored by the Cercle Francais

NOW

d2mml

DIAL
8-6416

"'A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE' is the first strong American film of
1962 and may well remain one of the year's best!"
N. Y. Herald-Tribune
THE BOLDEST VIEW OF LIFE YOU HAVE EVER SEEN!

I

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4
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Dial
Dial ENDING TONIGHT
2-6264 ATONY CURTIS
"THE OUTSIDER"
* THURSDAY 0 FRIDAY * SATURDAY*
...,....ateqS.O*S-SO~St,**--- aex@gOCpee'e
* A
41 Metto
: AyerpnwfutS.
JiM HUTTON w '~PAULA PRENTiSS
. ... as adaunless-t peP $ ..s Xy-ljpe medic!
:soldier f ghtinS q pro~ne _ ...with a contagioi iS-:
type ward ye os

I

tle theatre
HE TAVERN--(,t the Folksbaene)
he tAPA Ie pertory Com an , is a wo
er. t gas tak-en a gran mishmnash of
play---a cross between burlesque,
comedy, tragedy and melodrama--and
fashioned it into a robust ,a llop.
utterly hilarious work of teatre.

i

I

CARTER.
*
Ak0A

aM

htoectorI7isRabTnset esigner
Lloyd Burlingame deserve fat;medals
and so do actors George rizzar<as
the vagabond, Gerry Jedd as the dark

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