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May 01, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

awyer Cites 'U' Research
L Beneficial to Graduates
By DEBORAH BEATTIE I

"The University does not do re-
search for self-aggrandizement or
for research's sake," Vice-Presi-
dent for Research Ralph A. Saw-
yer explained at the North Central
Regional Conference for Pi Lamb-
da Theta.
"Research is done because it
makes a better university and the
fact that we have it provides a
better graduate program and fac-
ulty," he said.
Discussing the possibility of the
undergraduate program disappear-
ing as the graduate programs
grow, Sawyer pointed out that ap-
proximately 25 per cent of the uni-
versity students are enrolled in
Rackham School of Graduate
Studies, 15 per cent more are in
other post-graduate programs, and
60 per cent are in undergraduate
schools. "We expect always to have
a good undergraduate program,"
he noted.
Programs Grow
Research programs are develop-
ing rapidly at the University. In
1939 a total of $412,000 was spent
for University research. In 1961
research funds totalled $31,000,000.
"This is largely a reflection of
the money which the federal gov-
ernment is putting into research.
The University aslo contributes
money from endowments and gen-
eral funds," Sawyer explained.
About 90 per cent of the money
spent for physics research in all
American universities comes from
the federal government. In medi-
cal research, however, about 50
per cent of the research fund is
federal money.
The reason for this, Sawyer said,
is that "no agency except the fed-
eral government is interested in
physics, but there are many people
interested in medicine. Medical
Ford To Discuss
French Revolution
Prof. Franklin Ford of the Har-
vard University Institute for Re-
search and Behavioral Sciences
will speak on "Europe Before and
After the French Revolution-
Some Latter Day Reflections" at
4:15 p.m. today in Aud. A. The
lecture is sponsored by the Honors
Council.
DIAL NO 5-6290

researc funds can be obtained
fromrmany foundations."
'U' Benefits
"Not only does research make a
better undergraduate school and
a better University in general, it
is beneficial for the country and
also the people in Ann Arbor," he
commented.
"The University's research pro-
gram has had a remarkable effect
on Ann Arbor because it has at-
tracted industrial research labora-
tories to the city. There are now
38 different companies, employing
about 3,000 people, doing research
in Ann Arbor," Sawyer noted.

Meeting
Demanded
B~y. NAACP
The local chapter of the Nation-
al Association for the Advance-
ment of Colored People is trying
to set up a meeting with the City
Council and the Human Relations
Commission to discuss an alleged
statement made at an April 9 joint
meeting. The NAACP claims one
councilman said then that "Ne-
groes are genetically inferior to
whites."
The NAACP declined to reveal
the identity of the councilman,
who allegedly made the remark.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m., two days preceding
publication.
TUESDAY, MAY 2
General Notices
The spring written examinations for
the Masters Degree in Political Science
will be held on May 7, 8, and 9. The
schedule of examinations according to
field and subfield, will be posted on the
departmental bulletin board.
Opening Mon., May 7 - Henry IV,
Part 11, on the new semi-Elisabethan
stage in Trueblood Aud. Frieze Bldg.,
presented by the University Players, De-
partment of Speech. Box office open at
1:00, Mon., May 7. Tickets $1.50, $1.00
for Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs.; $1.75,
$1.25 for Fri. and Sat.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

linquishes his enrollment privilege for
subsequent semesters.
*-Graduate and professional students
who continue to live in University resi-
dence halls are expected to maintain a
$50 housing deposit.
For further information, call Office
of the Vice-President for Student Af-
fairs, 1524 Admin. Bldg. (663-1511, Ext.
3146).
Foreign Visitors
Following are the foreign visitors who
will be on the campus this week on the
dates indicated.
Program arrangements are being
made by the International Center: Mrs.
Clifford R. Miller.
Dr. S. M. Jafar, Deputy Executive Sec-
retary, The United States Educational
Foundation in Pakistan, Karrachi, Pak-
istan, May 1-2. Accompanied by Mrs.
Jafar.
Mr. Stanislaw Kuzinski, Member of
the Polish Parliament (Chairman, For-
eign Trade Committee). Poland, May 2.
Mr. Zdzislaw Milobedzki, Escort-in-
terpreter for Mr. Stanislaw Kuzinski,
Poland, May 2.
Mr. Kornelis L. Poll, Chief Editor, Hol-
lands Weekblad (weekly). The Hague,
Holland, May 2-3.

ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Chess Club, Meeting, May 2, 7:30 p.m.,
Union, Rm, 3KL. Free lessons for be-
ginners; everyone welcome.
*. * *
Congr. Disc. E & R Stud. Guild, Cost
Luncheon Discussion: "A Jewish View
of God," Rev. J. Edgar Edwards, May 1,
Noon, 802 Monroe.
*a a *
Ullr Ski Club, Canoe Meeting, Picnic,
Aspen Slides, May 2, 5:15 p.m., Union
Vestibule.
a a
U. of M. Folk Dancers, Meeting, In-
struction, Dancing, May 1, 7:30 p.m.,
1429 Hill,
a "aa
Wesleyan Foundation, Open House,
May 1, 8-11 p.m., Jean Robe's Apart-
ment Holy Communion, May 2, 7 a.m.,
Chapel.

TUESDAY, MAY 1, 1962
SAVE!
60% on your dryeleaning bills
FIRANK'S KLEEN KING
1226 PACKARD
SAFE -ODORLESS - WRINKLE-FREE
Any combination of clothing
(any colors) up to 10 lbs. for $2.00
20-MINUTE CYCLE
Attendant On Duty At All Times
Packard Laundry - Packard Drugs Adjoining

MANY PROGRAMS:
Aim of Welfare Agencies
To Service American Public

I

By ANN SCHULTZ
"Las year 390,000 children were
served by public welfare agencies,"
Miss Bess Craig of the United
States Children's Bnreau said yes-
terday in a speech on "Common
Concerns of Public Health and
Child Welfare."
"The aim of the federal govern-
ment is to provide service in all
counties of the United States by
1975-and service that is equally
available to all people in the area.''
Miss Craig cited the need for co-
ordination between child welfare
programs and dependent child
programs.
Finally, the federal government
plans to extend the program for
the day care of children, she ex-
plained.
Working Mothers
The day care plan would accom-
modate children whose mothers
are working. Miss Craig cited the
1960 Bureau of Census data which
stated that one-third of the work-
ing force is female and three mil-
lion children have working moth-
ers.
One type of program to aid
Mean.y To Speak
At YR's Meeting
Edward Meany, Republican sen-
atorial candidate, will speak at the
Young Republican Club meeting
at 7:30 p.m. today in Rm. 3B of
the Michigan Union.
DIAL NO 8-6416
' Ending Thursday *
"A FINE PICTURE
I SALUTE IT!"
-The New Yorker
"POIGNANTLY
MEANINGFUL
DRAMA!"
-Weller, N.Y. Times
IHE A

20'

children is the foster care pro-
gram. "We have recently discov-
ered that the child often develops
more problems when removed
from a very inadequate home and
put in a desirable environment,"
Miss Craig noted. "Therefore the
supportive service type of pro-
gram has been expanded."
This program includes day care
and counselling for parents. "It
also includes a homemakers ser-
vice which I call an 'itinerant
foster mother', someone to stay
with the children in the home
rather than sending them outside."
she said.
Aids Children
The third chilrens' public wel-
fare program aids mentally and
physically handicapped children.
Encouraging handicapped children
to remain at home is a new trend
in this area.
Miss Craig presented problems
in the field of adoption and un-
married mothers.
In 1960, there were 240,000 ille-
gitimate children, but only 14,000
were reported to public agencies.
"This indicates that a large num-
ber were given away illegally and
that more children remained with
their mothers than we think advis-
able," she notedI. "But since we
do not know if children come out
much worse, research is being done
on the matter."
In her c.losing remarks, Miss
Craig cited a need for a greater
exchange among public health
workers in their points of view on
common problems.
List Winners
In Michigras
Winners in the Michigras com-
petition have been announced.
They are:
Best Float-1st place, Geddes Co-op
and Phi Sigma Kappa with "The Com-
mittee invents the Bottle Opener"; 2nd
place, Alpha Omicron Pi and Evans
Scholars with "To Caroline from Uncle
Niki"; 3rd place, Gamma Phi Beta and
Sigma Alpha Epsilon with "Newton's
Dilemma - If Up Were Down."
Most Original Float-st place, Gam-
ma Phi Beta and Sigma Alpha Epsiloh
with "Newton's Dilemma"; 2nd place,
Alpha Omicron Pi and Evans Scholars
with "To Caroline"; 3rd place, Kappa
Kappa Gamma and Zeta Beta Tau with
"Michigan - Research Center of the
Midwest."
Show Booths-st place, Kappa Kappa
Gamma and Zeta Beta Tau with "Michi-
Ganders"; 2nd place, Alpha Epsilon Phi
and Phi Gamma Delta with "Alice in
Jazzland"; 3rd place, Phi Sigma Sigma
and Alpha Epsilon Pi with "Held Over".
Refreshment Booths - 1st place, Zeta
Tau Alpha and Alpha Sigma Phi with
"Evolution in Solution"; 2nd place Al-
pha Delta P1 and Delta Upsilon with
"There's Still Time Brother"; 3rd
place, Helen Newbury and Taylor House
with "Ponce de Leon Discovers the
Fountain of Youth".
Skill Booths - 1st place, Angell
House and Pi Lambda Phi with "Save
the Villain"; 2nd place, Delta Gamma
and Sigma Chi with "Yost Hill Downs";
3rd place, Delta Delta Delta and Lambda
Chi with "Helbound with Hercules."
Quartet To Present
Concert Program
The Walden (string) Quartet
from the University of Illinois mu-
sic school will present a public
concert at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow in
Rackham Lecture Hall. The pro-
gram will feature works of Mozart,
Bartok and Beethoven.

i

I

PAT
BOONE
BOBBy
DARIN
PAMELA
TIFFIN
ANN-
MARGRET

FRIDAY *
"MOON
pILOT"

F" Solid
entertain-
mentI"
-Wins en
N. Y. Post

I

STARTS MAY 1 1th
"JUDGMENT
AT
NUREMB ERG"

#ARIA SCHEL -STUARTHIT MA
and RODSTEIGER as Doc Mcdlanly
I Continental Distrib'ti .Inc.Release
Also. Academy Award Winning
Short Subject: "ERSATZ"

U!

FRIDAY
"View From The Bridge"

UNION INTERNATIONAL

SEMINAR

,.

"VIET NAM-
WHAT NEXT?"

Sponsored by
International Afffairs Committee

l

of the Michigan Union
Rooms 3-R and S

Thursday, May 3rd
i17 J D A

THE MERRY WIVES

I

i

11

'it

V4

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