100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 26, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, UI 20s 186

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN flAtLY THURSDAY. APRIL 26. 1962

1961 SURVEY:
Installment Buying Increases

By ELLEN SILVERMAN
American families with an in-
come of $10,000 are now buying
more on the installment plan, a
recently released survey reports.
The Survey Research Center
book, "1961 Survey of Consumer
Finances," notes that one-half of
the families interviewed reported
continuation of the use of install-
ment credit in a conservative
manner.
While previously it had been
thought that installment buying
was a middle-income occurance,
the report states that "survey data
no longer indicate a substantially
lower level of installment buying
in the top income group."
Education Not Relevant
Education seems not to play a
very important role in credit buy-
ing. Installment debt was noted to
be less frequent In groups of those

with college degrees and those
who have only a grade school edu-
cation.
It was shown that the lower,
middle and upper income family
units spend approximately the
same proportion of their incomes
on automobiles and furniture.
However, upper income families
buy more durable goods.
The largest proportion of new
car buyers was within the upper
income groups. However, the
amount of buying of used cars
was reported as fairly steady with-
in all of the groups.
Trade-In Sales Decrease
The report noted that the own-
ership of more than one car per
family probably has much to do
with the trend toward buying
used cars. It was also noted that
the percentage of trade-in sales
decreased over the past year.

ICampus Looks Forward
To Big Michigras Weekenid

(Continued from Page 1)
the Farmer's Market and end up
at the corner of South 'U' and
Forest Ave.
The parade will be led by the
University's marching band. It in-
cludes 20 floats built by housing
units. Also scheduled to perform
are bands from Allen Park High
School, Flint's Ainsworth and
Bendle High Schools, Milford High
School and Jackson's Vandercook
Lake High School.
LyeakyTo, Talk
On Polyphony
Professor Eugene Leahy of the
Rusicology department of Notre
Dame University will speak on
"Some New Thoughts on Trope,
Sequence and Medieval Polypho-
ny" at 4:15 p.m. today in Lane
Hall Aud.
University Players
To Present Opera
The University Players will pre-
sent "The Merry Wives of Wind-
sor," Otto Nicolai's opera based on
Shakespeare's play, at 8:00 p.m.j
today through Tuesday, excepting
Sunday, in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre. Prof. Josef Blatt of the
music school will direct the or-
chestra, and Prof. Jack E. Bender
of the speech department will
handle stage direction.

Special attractions in the parade
will be a mounted posse, a tank,
the Phi Gamma Delta marching
band, a calliope, a missile, frater-
nity dogs and clowns, the Wolver-
ine mascot, Ann Arbor Fire De-
partment Engines, the Michigras
Central Committee, and others.
A prize will be awarded tothe
best float in the parade. Judges
include Mayor Cecil 0. Creal of
Ann Arbor, University engineering
instructor James R. Cairns, Prof.
George M. McEwen of the depart-
ment of engineering English, and
Prof. Milton J. Cohen of the art
department. When Michigras last
came to campus two years ago,
Delta Chi fraternity and Elliot
House won the first place prize.
At 7:00 p.m. Friday Michigras
moves into full swing as the field
house opens and the carnival be-
gins. For the next six hours stu-
dents can roam at will among the
show, skill, amusement ride, and
refreshment booths. Entrance to
the field house is $.75.
Stein notes that in 1960 there
was a 45 minute wait outside Yost
for tickets.
On Saturday there will be a
special "kiddie carnival" with ad-
mittance free and the rides at re-
duced rates.
Families from the entire sur-
rounding area bring their children
,to Michigras.
Saturday night the field house
is again open till 1:00 a.m. The
winners of the float and booth
prizes and the winners of $3000
in door prizes and skill prizes will
be announced at this time.

In other durable items, trade- I
in sales were less frequent than
with cars. The book indicates that
over 60 per cent of new automo-
bile purchases were bought on
credit.
The report also delves into med-
ical expenses of the family. Profs.
George Katona, Charles A. Lin-
inger, James N. Morgan and Eva
Mueller of the economics depart-
ment and the Center note that
almost one third of the families
will probably incur large medical,
funeral or hospital expenses in
one given year.
Have Medical Expenses
In 1960, 29 per cent of the fam-
ily units report such expenses. One
out of every ten reported that it
owed a debt for such purposes
within a two month span (Jan.-
Feb., 1961).
High frequency of medical ex-
penses was reported in the age
groups of 25-40 (childbearing
years) and 45-54.
Hospital expenses were lower
for groups where the head of the
family is under 45 years of age.
The exception is found in fami-
lies with children under 6 years.
Universal Hospitalization
"The ratio of hospital expense
to medical expense is greatest for
those who are most likely to bear
children, a finding which probab-
ly reflects the almost universal
hospitalization for childbirth in
this country," the report notes.
The proportion of families with
medical debt decreased as the
head of the family became older.
The level rises again when the
head becomes older. However,
medical debt and spending is high-
est for those groups which have
children.
To Discuss
C urriculurn
The Literary School Steering
Committee is holding an open
meeting at 4:00 p.m. today in the
Conference Room of Angell Hall.
The subject of discussion will be
"Curriculum Changes." Jerold D.
Lax, '63, chairman of the commit-
tee, noted that petitioning for
next semester's committee is con-
tinuing. Petitions may be picked
up in the office of Associate Dean
of the Literary College James A.
Robertson. The petitions are due
in Robertson's office no later than
4:00 p.m. Friday. -
The German Department
presents
Max Frisch's play
Biedermann
and die
Brandstifter
on Friday, April 27,
8:30 P.M.
Arena Theater, Frieze Bldg.
Admission free

Relates How
Community
Stays Active
Constant infusion of new mem-
bers, good leadership and new ac-
tivities - these are three ways in
which social and community
groups can avoid becoming stag-
nant, Prof. Richard L. Cutler of
the psychology department said at
a session of yesterday's Adult Edu-
cation Institute.
"What was fun and vital and
important to group members 10
or two years ago or even two days
ago may cease to give members
the desired level of satisfaction,"
he explained.
There are three kinds of lead-
ership that determine the group's
future course: laissez faire, leav-
ing things about the same;
authoritarian, producing selective
membership but not developing
new leaders or new ideas; and
democratic, which absorbs more
people into the activity.
three Talks
To Conclude

By STEVEN HALLER
"The most important advice
that could be given to anyone in-
terested in collecting folk music
is to be thoroughly prepared be-
fore beginning," Prof. I. H. Wal-
ton of the Engineering College
said Saturday.
Discussing the topic "Collecting
Folk Music," Prof. Walton formcd
an analogy between the collecting
of material without prior prepar-
ation and the lab technician's
necessity of knowing what to do
at the onset..
Not only in the field of folk
songs but also with other aspects
of folklore, one should be thor-
oughly versed in the subject mat-
ter to recognize desirable material
upon confronting it. he said.
Furthermore, the f o Ik 1o r i s t
should be well acquainted with the
locality in question. The folklorist
should also know the locality's
history, Prof. Walton continued.
He may further gain the confi-
dence of the people involved by
learning the local way of speech
or occupational dialect.
There can be more than one
type of folk song in a given com-
munity, he noted. Immigrants
bring them from their respective
countries, which explains the ap-
pearance of Irish and English
folk songs on Great Lakes ore
freighters.
Prof. Walton stressed the im-
portance of honesty and sincerity

FOLK SONGS:
Professor Advises
MVusic Collectors

K.

in establishing rapport with folk-
lore informants. The collecting of
folk music should be a give-and-
take proposition.
The collector should give his in-
formant a song that the latter
might not already know once in
awhile, instead of merely being
on the receiving end of the agree-
ment, he added.
Bridge tenders, sailors, politi-
cians, and folk singers are among
the best sources, Prof. Walton
said; he added that, surprisingly,
libraries are poor sources of in-
formation for the folklorist.
Prof. Walton warned the pros-
pective collector against driving
up to an informant, dressed to the
teeth, in a shiny new automobile.
After one has gained the con-
fidence of his informants, he can
begin to ask such leading ques-
tions as "Do you know such-and
such a song?", but not until then,
he said.
University Senate
To View Teaching
The University Senate sub-com-
mittee for improvement of in-
struction will sponsor a colloquium
on "College Teaching" today at 4
p.m. in Aud. C. Associate Dean of
the literary college James A. Rob-
rertson will moderate the discus-
sion.

WHEN YOU GAMBLE
Do you like to WIN??
WHO WINS when the chips are
down in the game of NUCLEAR
BLUFF??-or should we coil it
--DEAD MAN'S BLUFF??
Write World Constitution
2310 No. 15th Ave.,
Phoenix 7, Ariz.
DIAL NO 5-6290
RODGERS AND
HAMMERSTEIN'S MCA~

I

I
DIAL NO 8-6416
"A MEMORABLE
EXPERIENCE!"
-Cook, World-Telegram
"ENGROSSING,
ABSORBING
DRAMA!"
-Zunser, Cue
"HIGHLY
RECOMMENDED!"
-Masters, Daily News
"GENERATES
DRAMATIC
POWER!"
-Beckley, Herald-Tribune
entertain-
eni
-Wtnsten:
N. Y. Pas!
!WARM 3II SCM TART W19TU
anid ROD STEIGER as Do c Mcai,
Coin~aiDintlatw ,,In ,n

4

r1

<1

i

'i

4

.

Series

Today

The Adult Education Institute
enters its second and final day
today with a series of three lec-
tures.
After registration at 8:30 a.m.
in the Rackham lobby, Professors
Marvin Eisenberg of the history
of art department and Marvin
Felheim of the English depart-
ment will deliver a talk on "The
Concept of Man in Art and Liter-
ature" in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
Prof.'Emeritus Harlow 0. Whit-
temore of the landscape architec-
ture department will speak on
"The Arboretum - a Progress Re-
port" at 12:30 p.m. in the Michi-
gan League Ballroom, and at 2:00
Professors Marvin Needler of the
political science.department and
David Burks of the history de-
partment at the Dearborn Center
will lecture on "New Approaches
to Old Problems in Latin Amer-
ica."

_.

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

11

NOW

DIAL
NO 2-6264
O KA =IN N~
cnianuT eM Ia
."t~ t UUI AND DE FW

PAID ADVERTISEMENT
CinemJVAAqAl
PRESENTS
THURSDAY and FRIDAY at 7 and 9

I

to VIDA 1 CC 1

w

0" - EA LR B EDMUNDR ND EN-4 1
MIES MRVINOBRIEN" DVINE-MRAY" w "- ,

The HUNCHBACK
of NOTRE DAME

A"
-gum"

Charles Laughton, Maureen O'Hara,
Edmund O'Brien
SATURDAY and SUNDAY at 7 and 9
Pabst's
THE LAST TEN DAYS
OF HITLER
Oscar Werner, Albin Skoda
Short: Melies' A Trip to the Moon (1902)

I

MEN TO MEET
THE CHALLENGE
OF FUTURE
AIR TRAFFIC
CONTROL

PETITIONING OPEN
for
ALL SENIOR EDITORIAL
STAFF POSITIONS
(Except City Editor )
On The Michigan Daily
QUALIFICATIONS
JUNIOR RANK OR ABOVE
SCHOLASTICALLY ELIGIBLE
Petitions are available at the Board's Office,
'tiiAnt U P Iinm RlA o- 420 Mavnard St

Fast and efficient use of air space is
an increasing concern of the United
Statgs. The public welfare demands
a well-conceived plan for Air Traf-
fic Control, now and in the future.
To meet this challenge, MITRE is
cooperating with the Federal Avi-
ation Agency in developing and
proving out the design of the na-
tion's future Air Traffic Control
system. Making use of its' Air
Traffic Control System test bed in
Bedford, Mass., MITRE formu-
lates design to reducesystem con-
cepts to practice for test operation
and evaluation in both live and
simulated environments.
Currently, personnel assignments
are available in the following areas:
System Engineering, Operations
Research and Operations Analysis,

Design and Development of Large
Scale Man-Machine Experiments
for Test and Evaluation.
Experienced scientists and engi-
neers are needed immediately for
this important job and others in
MITRE's expanding role in the
design and development of real-
time computer based systems.
College graduates with high scho-
lastic achievements and an interest
in these fields are invited to apply.
MITRE is located in pleasant
suburban Boston.
Write in confidence to Vice Presi-
dent - Technical Operations, The
MITRE Corporation, Box 208,
Dept. UMD4 Bedford, Mass.

Probably the most difficult
task that the performing arts
can face is making the ugly,
the grotesque, the repulsive ap-
pealing. Take King Kong. For
this film to achieve its almost
tragic effect, the gigantic, ter-
rifying, beast-ape Kong had to
be humanized. Some distinctly
human feeling (". . . it was
Beauty killed the Beast") had
to show forth from its encase-
ment in that monstrous hairy
body. Without this human
quality, Kong would have re-
mained just another Hollywood
monster and audiences would
have witnessed his death with-
out either regret or remorse.
But even more difficult than
the job of humanizing a beast
is the job of making a disgust-
ingly deformed human being an
object of compassion and sym-
pathy. People react to excessive
human deformity violently.
They, feel vaguely uncomfort-
able or actually shudder when
confronted with physical de-
formity-a child's twisted body
or a beggar's mishapened legs
or hands. With reactions like
these, is it possible to make a
successful film in which the
main character is the epitome
of physical deformity? The
Hunchback of Notre Dame is
the spectacular evidence which
attests that a deformed charac-
ter can be sympathetic and
memorable. In fact, Quasimodo,
despite his bitterness, his ma-
levolence, and his loathesome
grotesqueness emerges as one
of the most tender, devoted and
courageous characters in all lit-
erary and film history.
Quasimodo, the deaf, de-
formed bell-ringer (of the ca-
thedral) hopelessly in love with
the beautiful Esmeralda (Mau-
reen O'Hara) is played by
Charles Laughton. Laughton's
portrayal makes the role even
more of a challenge. Unlike Lon
Chaney's tall - stooped, lean

One other member of the cast
is worthy of mention. Those
who have seen Edmund O'Brien
over the last 15 years (e.g., the
fat, bearded, drunken newspa-
per editor in The Man Whp
Shot Liberty Valance) may not
recognize the slim young hero
of this film. Time, not "make-
up" is the cause of this aston-
ishing transformation.
(Note: Those who are study-
ing What Happened at Salem
may find the famous witch tri-
al scene useful.)
Among twentieth-century ar-
tists, there are few more hardy
perennials than G. W. Pabst.
His Joyless Street of 1925, a
powerful film of inflation-rid-
den Austria, is a haunting doc-
ument of the era. This was fol-
lowed by Secrets of the Soul,
done under the supervision of
Karl Abraham and Hanns
Sachs, a remarkable psychiat-
ric film. In Pabst's silent era,
there succeeded such fine films
as the melodramatic The Loves
of Jeanne Ney and the enig-
matic Pandora's Box. However,
Pabst's early sound fllms were
as famous and equally impres-
sive. Westfront 1918 bears com-
parison with Remarque's All
Quiet on the Western Front as
an eloquent anti-war film. The
Three-Penny Opera, with its
original cast, still has sell-out
performances. Kameradschaft
is a favorite with socialists, film
societies, and less affiliated
groups.
There and then, Pabst's film
career seemed at an end. He
did not contribute to the faked-
up, semi-artistic successes of
the Nazi period. He must have
left Nazi Germany, since Ar-
thur Knight makes the state-
ment that Pabst returned to
Germany after the war. But
after this unproductive period,
he brought out The Last Ten

THE
MFPR V

i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan