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April 19, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-04-19

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY_ _ _ __ RDAVAP

IRIL 19, 1962

X11 (' Fri T7"!' -

4-1 YM 4'k 0 W7 rl" V V

rvT'UWAf[ GROW TH:
Pa istan's Progress
Great, -Ahmed Says
By JAMES NICHOLS I |||||_

Center Offers Variety
Of Educational Films

4

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By HARRY PERLSTADT

Aziz Ahmed, Pakistan's ambas-
sador to the United States, de-
scribes his nation as one making
remarkable progress under re-
markable postwar pressure.
He spoke yesterday afternoon
under the joint sponsorship of the
Center for Southern Asian Studies,
the Center for Research on Eco-
nomic Development, and the De-
partment of Public Administra-
tion.
Ahmed called the emergence of
the world's ex-colonies as inde-
pendent nations "the most im-
portant development since the last
war." The fifty new nations,
among them Pakistan, are seeking
"political stability and economic
strength," he said.
New Horizons
Independence has "opened up
new vistas, expanded new hori-
zons" to the peoples of these na-
tions, Ahmed noted. United Na-
tions Ambassador Adlai Stevenson
has called the phenomenon "a'
Quadrants Tap
Ncew Members
Robert Ditz, '64E, Hal Frazier
Jr., '64, and Lawrence Jackier, '64,
were tapped Sunday night as
South Quadrangle Quandrants.
Also tapped for this honorary
were Harvey Kabaker, '64. John
McKinnon, '63E, John Pinnell,
'64A&D, Eric B. Rhodehamel,
'64A&D, and Wayne Witemeyer,
'64.
Residence Hall's Business Man-
ager Leonard A. Schaadt was tap-
ped as an honorary member.
DIAL NO 8-6416
ENDING TONIGHT
Alec Guinness
Festival
ALEC GUINNESS
JOHN MILLS
IN
"Tunes of Glory"
AND

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AZIZ AHMED
... ambassador to the U.S.

revolution of rising expectations."
"The peoples of Asia are no longer
willing- to accept a life of poverty
and disease," he explained.
Ahmed quoted Pakistani Presi-
dent Ayub Khan in calling the
next 20 years the nation's "most
crucial." Pakistan will be "sub-
berged in a tidal wave of totali-
tarianism," he said, if it fails to
"make the grade." Its leaders can
expect tension and frustration
among the people "if advances fall
too far short of expectations."
The ambassador described some
of the reforms being made by
Pakistan in trying to "make the
grade."
Economic Reforms
He said Pakistan's was "a
healthy, forward-looking economy"
as a result of recent economic re-
forms. The nation has been suc-
cessful in encouraging private en-
terprise and investment. The
amount of private investment
which was the goal of the present
5-year plan was attained in its
first 18 months, he noted.
Pakistan has instituted financial
and administrative reforms to
speed its development. The central
government and the two provin-
cial governments of the divided
country have been reorganized and
modernized. Planning organiza-
tions on both levels have been
granted more autonomy, Ahmed
said.

Karl Marx was the man who
"Instituted the present govern-
ment in Russia;"
"Had something to do with the
New Deal"
and "Died some time ago."
Those remarks by shoppers pre-
faced a panel discussion about
Marx on a television program
called "Genius." Short segments
of this, and other programs, high-
lighted Prof. Garnett Garrison's
talk yesterday on the University's
television center.
Prof. Garrison is head of the
television center which has pro-
duced over 600 educational and
informative programs for commer-
cial station use.
Television Network
He explained that programs are
videotaped at the University and
then broadcast over a television
network which includes 49 stations
in the United States, one in
Eastern Nigeria and one in Ber-
muda. The programs range from
nuclear medicine to physical ad-
justment in marriage to Shake-
speare to music.
But the television center has
also done work right here on
campus, Prof. Garrison explained.
A television studio in the Frieze
building enables students to learn
how to use the equipment as well
as write, direct, produce and act
for television.
The medical school employs a
color television closed circuit sys-
tem to show psychiatric and clini-
cal interviews as well as surgery.
Prof. Garrison noted that the doc-
tors said the color on the television
was better than color film and
that they could see more on tele-
vision than if they stood next to
the operating surgeon.
May Reduce
Corps Years'
From 4 to 2
(Continued from Page 1)

The television center is the only
non-profit institution in the coun-
try to have the equipment for
videotaping color television. Prof.
Garrison + explained that these
would be used for programs, par-
ticularly in the medical field.
He also pointed to the closed
circuit television in the law school
which televises events in the
Washtenaw County Court.
Significant Advance
The American Bar Association
has called it one of the most
significant advances in legal edu-
cation in the last 100 years and
is currently investigating the pos-
sibility of videotaping trials for
both research and appeals.
At present, however, videotaping
of trials is prohibited and tele-
vising is permitted only for edu-
cational purposes, Prof. Garrison
said.
One of the center's latest pro-
jects has been the production of
"The Idea of Michigan," a filmed
biography of the University, and
filming archives of campus life.

Average '
Grade Point
Reaches 2.6
During fall semester thirty Uni-
versity freshmen made perfect all
"A" academic records, Edward
Groesbeck, director of the Office
of Registration and Records said.
Seventy-nine freshmen were just
two- or three-tenths of a point
from attaining a four-point.
B Average
Another 653 earned grades rang-
ing from 3.6 to 3.0. Of 762 fresh-
men achieving superior grades, the
top 257 will receive book prizes in
a special May 12 convocation:
The all-freshman average was
2.42. The women's average was
2.47, compared with 2.39 for the
men.
Overall Grade Point
The overall-undergraduate aver-
age for last fall was 2:60. This was
the same as in fall, 1960. Coeds
averaged 2.69, while men achieved
a 2.52.
Martha Cook residence hall for
junior-senior women earned the
highest average among campus
groups with an overall 3.08.

Two Senior
Honoraries
Tap Women
Mortar Board
Mortar Board, the national hon-
orary society for junior women,
tapped 16 University women Tues-
day night.
Those tapped were: Madeline
Bates, Karen Cowan, Ruth Gal-
anter, Ann Gomez, Carol Kauf-
man, Laury Lipman and Edith
Morris.
Judith Oppenheim, Penelope
Patton, Joyce Peckham, Barbara
Portnoy, Mary Schmidt, Margaret
Skiles, Allyn Thompson and Mary
Jane West were also tapped.
Junior women who have shown
outstanding qualities of scholar-
ship, leadership and service are
eligible for membership in Mortar
Board.
Senior Society
Senior Society, an honorary for
independent women, tapped 20
women last night for their scholar-
ship, service and leadership to the
University.
The following girls were selected:
Cynthia J. Beerbohm, '62; Ger-
trude H. Klach, '62Ph; Sherry N.
Levy, '62; Judith A. Meyer, '62;
Eugenia Pann, '62; Yvonne Wood,
'62; Judith Bleier, '63; Marge
Bower, '63Ed; Caroline Dow, '63;
and Sandy Gilden, '63.
Also Debra Horwitz, '63; Jan
Hurshburger, '63; Sharon Jeffrey,
'63; Ilona Kiraldi, '63; Hope Mar-
der, '63; Caroline Robinson, '63;
Dorey Ruswinckle, '63; Sue Shap-
iro, '63; Sue Turner, '63; and Kay
Watson, '63.
Kish To Consider
Cold War Myths
Prof. Leslie Kish of the sociology
department will speak on" Trouble-
some Myths of the Cold War" at
7:30 p.m. tonight in Rm. 3-B of
the Michigan Union.
Voice To Present
Forum on Peace

I

rme

NOTICE OF POSTPONEMENT
GRADUATE STUDENT COUNCIL
ELECTION POSTPONED
UNTIL APRIL 26, 1962
INSTEAD OF APRIL 19, 1962

U. of M. Folk Music Festival Presents
The BEST in BALLADS, BLUES,
BREAKDOWNS, and BLUEGRASS
Jesse Fuller, Bob Dylan, Oberlin Bluegrass Band,
Paul Prestopino, Perry Lordman, Danny Kulb,
Mike Sherker, Marc Silber,
and a gathering of other folk from the midwest
This Saturday - Trueblood Auditorium

som

Adlib Watches Students

f

Petitioning
for the.
1962 MUSKET
CENTRAL COMMITTEE,
Will Continue Through April 24
Petitions Available In The STUDENT OFFICES,
MICHIGAN UNION
For Further Information
Call Harry M. Toxin, General Chairman
663-5183

GUINNESS
IN
"THE HORSE'S
MOUTH"

I

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*COMING FRIDAY
entertain-
mentV'
-Wigstenj
N. Y. Post
+1MIASML " i *TUARTWHITMAN
and R0D STEIGER as Dc cNally
(Cootinastal~istributing. Inc.Rius

i

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SUMMER
JOBS
IN
EUROPE
CONTACT: INTERNATIONAL
STUDENT TRAVEL CENTER, 39
CORTLANDT ST., N.Y. 7, N.Y.,
80 9-8902

PAID ADVERTISEMENT
PRESENTS
THURSDAY and FRIDAY at 7 and 9
SUNSET BOULEVARD
Gloria Swanson, William Holden,
. Erich von Stroheim
Short: The Ugly Duckling (Disney)
SATURDAY and SUNDAY at 7 and 9
Fellini's VITELLONI
Franco Fabrizi, Albert Sordi
(Earlier adventures of the hero of La Dolce Vita)
Short: Roger van der Weyden

I

1

Dial 5-6290 ENGS
WRo-6WWrnMYVZM
OULMA ROSSANO YETTE GEORGE
doHAIUNDE BRAlIE MIMIEOLH AMILTON

mmwmmmwomdw '.

MW

TOM & JERRY color Cartoon

I

Friday: "STATE FAIR"

I

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,aui is t nl' n
l l ntmll lt mu n a
' 'x'

DIAL NO 2-6416
Today Through Saturday

A dead male body floats face
down in the large swimming
pool of a decaying Hollywood
mansion. A flashback: the same
pool, dry and empty except for
the large grey rats that scoot
across its floor.
If the number of times a film
has been requested Is any indi-
cation of its popularity, then
Billy Wilder's Sunset Boulevard
(1950) is certain to be a sell-
out. For years patrons have
been asking Cinema Guild to
bring this film back. Until now,
however, it has been unavail-
able.
Those who are going to see it
for the first time should not be
misled by the fact that Billy
Wilder (Some Like It Hot) di-
rected it. Sunset Boulevard is
no comedy. (It does have a few
brief, brilliantly comic scenes-
Gloria Swanson's imitation of
Chaplin, for example.) It is,
in fact, probablythe most re-
lentlessly somber film that has
ever come out of Hollywood. It
is the best picture of mental,
moral, and social decay on film
with the exception of La Dolce
Vita. Wilder, whose poorest
films are those in which he
takes a moral stand (political
or sexual), fortunately main-
tains a dry, sceptical amorality
in Sunset Boulevard. The result

perfectly cast for this role as
Paul Newman was for The Hus-
tlers, there is a flawless perf-
formance by Eric von Stroheim
and a supporting cast which
includes Cecil B. DeMille, Hed-
da Hopper, Jack Webb and a
trio of "silent" greats who help
Norma Desmond (Gloria Swan-
son) keep alive and inhabit the
good old days-Buster Keaton,
Anna Nilsson and H. B. Warner.
While La Strada and Nights
of Cabiria established Fellini as
a great film artist with Ameri-
can audiences, it was the bold
notoriety of La Dolce Vita that
made him known to many who
would not ordinarily attend a
foreign film. This striking por-
trayal of the deterioration of
a young writer who moves in
Roman cafe society had a pre-
decessor which .is still little-
known. Made just before La
Strada, I Vitelloni reveals the
life of the "hero ofrLaDole
Vita in his home town before
his departure for Rome. Mar-
cello and his cronies are bored
young men in a small dull com-
munity and ready for any pre-
text of diversion. Though Mar-
cello and his friend the writer
are presented with some sym-
pathy Fellini is unsparing in his
depiction of gang mores; and
the portrait of the indolent,

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