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April 19, 1962 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-04-19

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TILE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE T

TTttTR.CTIAV_ APRIL 14_ 1 442

.'m~nrba1seM . a'D1cT, 1010, 9 AGE

Kennedy

F orgives 11Steel

Record Peace Budget
O7f $478 Billion Passes
Unanimously in House,

Lays Stress
On Limited
War Forces
Approves Total Less
Than Kennedy Asked
WASHINGTON ()-A unani-
mous House vote sent-to the Sen-
ate yesterday a record peacetime
outlay of $47.8 billion to modern-
ize and bolster America's armed
forces at home and overseas.
The spending blueprint contin-
ues to stress the buildup of con-
ventional and limited war forces.
Yet more than 18 per cent of the
total is earmarked for strategic
retaliatory forces, including 200
more Minuteman intercontinental
missiles and six more Polaris sub-
marines.
The 388-0 roll call came afterI
the House defeated several moves
to amend the bill. Among those
slapped down was a vigorous at-
tempt by Armed Services Commit-
tee Chairman Carl Vinson (D-Ga)
to knock out a limit on the amount
of repair and conversion work that
can be done in naval shipyards.
The total voted for the year
starting next July 1 is $67.5 mil-
lion less than President John, F.
Kennedy requested, reflecting some
cuts and additions by the House
Appropriations Committee. But it
is $1.3 billion more than Congress
provided the military for the cur-
rent fiscal year.
The measure provides only for
strictly military programs, includ-
ing research, development and val-
uation of new defense instruments.
More billions will be provided in
later measures for military con-
struction, civil defense and foreign
military aid.
The bill provides funds for keep-
ing half of the Strategic Air Force
on 15-minute alert for retaliatory
strikes. Also kept in was $171 mil-
lion for development of the con-
troversial RS-70 reconnaissance
strike bomber plus $52.9 million
to speed research for the ultra-
high performance radar needed to
make the plane a usable weapon.

CARL VINSON
. , . down to defeat
GEMINI:
Unit Seeks
Astronauts
WASHINGTON (P) - The Na-
tional Aeronautics and Space Ad-
ministration said yesterday it will
choose up to 10 new astronauts
in the next few months to fly two
man Gemini spacecraft.
The new astronauts will be
drawn from the ranks of experi-
enced jet test pilots-preferably
those now engaged in flying high
performance aircraft.
They nmust have attained experi-
mental flight test status through
the military service, or by flying
for a private company or for
NASA programs such as the X-15,
or must have graduated from a
military test pilot school.
They must also have a college'
degree in the physical or biologi-
cal sciences or in engineering. The
age limit is 35, and the height
limit 6 feet.
The Gemini spacecraft, first of
which is to be delivered to NASA
next year, will weigh more than
three tons, or almost twice the
weight of the Mercury capsule. It
will be launched by a Titan II
rocket.

Army Vows
To Cut Profit
On Missiles
WASHINGTON (P)-The Army
pledged yesterday to cut down
some of the costly pyramiding of
profits by middle men in its mis-
sile programs.
But Lt. Gen. John H. Hinrichs,
ordnance chief, and Assistant Sec-
retary of the Army Paul R. Igna-
tius told critical Senate investiga-
tors it is a mistake to judge the
reasonableness of a missile maker's
profits solely on the basis of how
much it costs him to do a com-
plete job.
The Senate Investigations Sub-
committee announced both men
would be called back some time
next week for more quizzing. The
subcommittee is investigating prof-
its the Army paid Western Electric
Co. and Douglas Aircraft Co. as
the two big contractors which de-
veloped and produced the anti-
aircraft Nike missiles system.
Hinrichs announced plans to es-
tablish an Army ordnance field
office at Western Electric's con-
trol center to help run the now
developing Nike Zeus long-range
missile program.
Ignatius said he would recom-
mend that the Pentagon consider
establishing special -rules for fig-
uring a fair profit for holders of
prime contracts and chief subcon-
tracts.

Claims Basic
Obj ectives
Agreement
By WHITNEY SHOEMAKER
Associated Press Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - President
John F. Kennedy proclaimed peace
yesterday with "big steel."
Placated by victory last week
in his battle on price-boosting
steel manufacturers, Kennedy said
there is no room for hostility or
vindictiveness. What's more, his
administration and leaders of in-
dustry "are in basic agreement
on far more objectives than we
are in disagreement."
While he was forgiving, Kenne-
dy wasn't wholly forgetting his ad-
ministration's role in the sequence
of events which led steel producers
to rescind their $6-a-ton price in-
creases.
A grand jury investigation of
whether major steel companies
may have violated antitrust laws
will go on, Kennedy said, and the
government will continue stressing
its position against labor-manage-
ment contracts that could breed
inflation.
His main theme, however, was
one of harmony.
"Let me make it clear," he said
in a prepared announcement,
"that this administration harbors
no ill will against any individual,
any industry, corporation or seg-
ment of the American economy."
He referred to the announced
steel price boosts as a blunder that
was rectified by revoking them.
"When a mistake has been re-
tracted and the public interest
preserved, nothing is to be gained
from further public recrimina-
tions," he said.
Kennedy wasn't asked, nor did
he volunteer, what he and Roger
M. Blough, board chairman of
United States Steel, discussed at
a White House meeting Tuesday
evening.

U.S. Sets
New Offer
In Geneva
By The Associated Press
GENEVA - The United States
proposed yesterday that the world
disarm by means of modern inven-
tory control techniques similar toT
those used by big corporations.1
The draft treaty submitted to
the 17 nation general disarmament
conference alms at a world which
has cast its weapons away through
three carefully enforced stages.
American Ambassador Arthur H.
Dean said the 35-page documentj
"truly beats the swords into plow-
shares." Then peace would be'
maintained by a United Nations'
force so strong "that no state can
challenge it," he added.
Kennedy Proposals
The draft elaborates on propos-
als made by President John F.
Kennedy to the United Nations
last September. Kennedy told his
news conference in Washington
the draft is an attempt to achieve
a breakthrough in negotiations
now stalemated.
The program emphasizes the
simultaneous buildup of United
Nations peace keeping machinery
as balanced arms reduction goes
forward.
Dean said the treaty outline pro-
vides a final solution of the nu-
clear weapons problem, the preser-
vation of outer space for peaceful
purposes and the adoption of
measures to avoid the risk of war
"by accident, miscalculation, fail-
ure of communications or surprise
attack."
Cool Reaction
The Communists reacted coolly
Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister
Valerian A. Zorin refrained from
commenting inside the conference
room itself. Later he told newsmen
the American document "does not
seem to contain much that is
new."
Kennedy volunteered his en-
dorsement of United States efforts
at Geneva in the news conference,
but newsmen peppered him with
questions about nuclear testing, an
issue in deadlock at Geneva while
the United States prepares to fol-
low Soviet suit by resuming in-
the-air shots.
Kennedy said no specific date
has been set for the start of the
United States test series, to be
held in the Pacific, but the gen-
eral timing remains as previously
announced.
"Of course we shall proceed"
with testing unless the Soviets
agree to the western proposal for
a test ban treaty with internation-
al inspections, he said.
Kennedy has not heard of a
proposal, which a reporter said
the Soviet representative at Gen-
eva, Semyon Tsarapkin, had made
to a women's delegation, offering
l to negotiate a test ban treaty if
the United States would close down
one of its overseas missile bases.

SCOTLAND YARD:
Spy-Catcher Prepared
To Bring In Defectors
LONDON (M-Scotland Yard armed its top spy catcher with ar-
rest warrants yesterday and told him to bring in Guy Burgess and
Donald Maclean, British turncoat diplomats, if they ever show up
from Soviet Russia.
The question was: how, where and when?
The Yard's move was based on reports that the runaways, who
defected to the Soviet Union 11 years ago next month, were plan-
ning finally to quit the Soviet*
Union.
The arrest warrants for the pair, Pair Charge
both of whom had served at the
British Embassy in Washington, 'Br *wh'
charge violation of Britain's offi- UE)1
cial secrets act.
In taking out arrest warrants,MOCW4'-wRusade
Scotland Yard said it had reason MOSCOW ()-Two Russian de-
to suppose the two defectors may fectors who returned home said
either have left the Soviet Union yesterday they had been question-
or are planning to do so. ed about rockets and launching
But reporters found Maclean- ramps and subjected to "anti-So-
onetime head of the American de- viet brain washings" by United
partment in the Foreign Office- States intelligence agents.
still in his Moscow apartment dur-
ing the day. He declined to make One is Alexei Golub, a balding
any comment on Scotland Yard's man with a little mustache. He is
action. the biochemist whose defection
Burgess was reported on vaca- from a Soviet tourist party in Am-
tion elsewhere in the Soviet Union. sterdam last October provoked the
Scotland Yard explained the recall of Dutch and Soviet am-
warrants were issued for use in bassadors'
case they appear in some country The other is Nikolai Vokhma-
with which Britain has an extra- kov, an electrician at a mine i
dition treaty or otherwise come Southern Russia.
under the Jurisdiction of British They appeared at a news con-
courts. ference arranged by Alexei Popov
acting chief of the Foreign Min
istry press department. Popov as-
serted at the outset: "Imperialisi
intelligence services use defector
P' ~not merely for purposes of collect-
Pol 1tical 1Its ing espionage, but also to whi
up the Cold War and to slande
the Soviet Union and Commu-
TaX Ineentive nm.
WASHINGTON (A) - President
John F. Kennedy applauded yes-
terday a bipartisan commission re-
port recommending tax incentives Joi
to encourage more people to con- ACTIVITIES STAFF of
tribute to political campaign funds. "The Activity for Men W
Kennedy expressed "profound LEADERSH IP, and Opport
gratitude" to a nine-member
group that unanimously proposed Organizati
moves -to take the "shoddy" label
off political giving and to reduce Tuesday, Ap
presidential campaign costs. It es-
timated costs of all political cam- 3rd Floor Conference Ro
paigns ran from $165 million to
$175 million in 1960.
The President told his news con-
ference the report is now being
examined by his administration Faculty and T
and "will be the basis of legisla-
tive recommendations sent to the
Congress which I think can pro-
vide a significant advancement of TA K E
the public interest in this very vi-
tal field."
Key recommendation by the ag nU
group, headed by Dean Alexander MiChIg U
Heard of the University of North
Carolina graduate school, was for for you
a $10 tax credit to apply to con-
tributions given by individuals to A T
national and state political com- A
mittees. pw t 1 C C

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Asks Release
Of Tshombe
UNITED NATIONS (to)-Acting
Secretary-General U Thant last
night ordered the chief United Na-
tions force officer in The Congo to
have the Congo government release
the plane on which Katanga Pres-
ident Moise Tshombe was trap-
ped yesterday at the Leopoldville
Airport.
A United Nations spokesman
said that Tshombe, who was try-
ing to return to Elisabethville after,
conferences with Congo Premier
Cyrille Adoula, had been in the
plane all day, unable to move after
the Congolese authorities blocked
the airport with fire engines and
other vehicles.
Tshombe was reported in good
health and United Nations troops
were protecting him and the plane
efficiently.

I

MOISE TSHOMBE
... trapped

kN MEN!!

in The
the MICHIGAN UNION
rho Seek RESPONSIBILITY,
'unity for ADVANCEMENT"
naI Meeting
ril 24, 4:15 P.M.
om-MICHIGAN UNION

t
C

Deadlock on College Aid
Averted by House Group
WASHINGTON-A threatened deadlock over the Administration's
program to aid colleges was averted yesterday as the bill's managers
in the House yielded a point to opponents of Federal scholarships.
House and. Senate versions of the measure are consequently ex-
pected to go before a conference committee for adjustment of differ-
ences when Congress returns from a ten-day Easter recess.
"The House Rules Committee has been blocking House-Senate con-
ference negotiations for more than two months. The House panel op-

each ing Fellows
nion presents
r children
UR OF
LD VILLAGE

A
.,

I

......

MAUNDAY THURSDAY SERVICE
university reformed church
ALL STUDENTS WELCOME
Special choral numbers accompanied
by a musical ensemble.
Sermon by Rev. Calvin Malefyt
"The Joy of the Cross"
7:30 P.M. at the YM-YWCA

Mrs. Gaillot's
Husband Asks
Same Penalty
NEW ORLEANS OP)-A Roman
Catholic-husband of a wife ex-
communicated by their church in
a wrangle over parochial school
desegregation - yesterday asked
the same penalty.
"If she is truly excommunicated
from the Catholic Church," B. J.
Gaillot, Jr. wrote to Archbishop
Joseph Francis Rummel, "then I,
too, should be excommunicated."
Gaillot said "my beliefs are in
exact concurrence with my wife."
Archbishop Rummel has ordered
racial desegregation of all arch-
diocesan parochial and private
schools, effective next fall.
Gaillot said he believed his wife
had done no wrong- positively,
not in any way."

poses the Senate version's provi-
sions for $925-million in Federal
grants to provide college scholar-
ships to talented and needy stu-
dents.
The committee chairman, Rep,
Howard M. Smith (D-Va), said
that the House managers of the
bill had given assurances that they
would not accept the scholarshir
provision in conference without
getting specific approval from thi
House.
-The assurances were relayed t
the committee at a closed session
yesterday morning. The result
Smith reported, was an apparent
consensus in favor of approving a
resolution to send the bill to con-
ference.
The committee is expected tc
act the week after next, wherm
members return from the Eastei
recess that starts today.
The Senate - approved college-
aid bill is patterned closely or
Kennedy's recommendations.
Copyright, 1962, The New York Times

a.
d
e
Y
p
t,
r
n

ORIENTATION
LEADERS?

1.

Ne

IUKEI'4rI Lt

Mfore

National
Roundup
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-President John
F. Kennedy yesterday announced
the cancellation ofrthertrial of one
disgruntled Army reservist and the
release of another from confine-
ment. "Theiroffenses were more
misguided than criminal in in-
tent," he said.
WASHINGTON - The House
sent to President John F. Kennedy
yesterday a bill authorizing $32
million for the construction of ed-
ucational television s t a t i o n s
throughout the nation.
MIAMI-A former Cuban army
officer was reported conferring
yesterday with heads of the Peo-
ples Revolutionary Movement re-
garding plans for possible anti-
Castro warfare.
WASHINGTON - The United
States recognized the Guido gov-
ernment of Argentina yesterday
after delaying action almost three
weeks.
* * '
WASHINGTON-President John
F. Kennedy's plan to set up a new
Office of Science and Technology
got an okay yesterday from the
House Government Operations
Committee. The plan goes into ef-
fect automatically in 60 days un-
less either the House or Senate dis-
approves it.

Sign up now
UNION-LEAGUE

Department of Speech

Laboratory Playbill

"BLESSED BE THE RED, WHITE
AND BLUE OF HEART"
HERBERT PROPPER
4:10 Trueblood Auditorium
Frieze Building

This Saturday, April 21
12-5 $1.50
For information and reservations
Call the Student Offices from 3-5 P.M.

L

I

ever be

".,

a sale like
this!"

TODAY

Admission Free

SAVE 1
ON FAMOUS
LD

I

Reg. 1r
in s
flower-

50 lipsticks 100
pecial p
topped cases U
8 BEST-SELLING SHADES
BLOSSOM PINK PYXIE PINK
CHERRY PINK CORALNECTAR APRICOT
MOLLY BRIGHT
MARIGOLD QORANGE PEPPER
Pick your favorites or have them all
at this*saving, for a "lipstick ward-
robe" to accent all your Spring and
Summer clothes. Buy them for gifts
... they're so pretty, so wonderful at

University of Michigan Folk Music Festival
This Weekend . .
Friday 8:00 P.M.
JESSE FULLER
in the Union Ballroom
SSaturday 8:30 P.M.
HOOTENANNY
Trueblood Auditorium
ct i4P

AI

I

i

Annual Banquetan Ball'
Given by the AFRICAN STUDENTS UNION of Michigan

N. M W;as

I

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