100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 09, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-02-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

YD LETTERS:

n To Star as 'Medea'

y MALNDA BERRY
Judith Anderson has been
,d to star in Medea '62,
an which has been spe-
eated for her current road
vill appear in Hill Aud.
8.
will be the first perform-
the new Professional
Program being created for
versity by Prof. Robert C.
r, executive director of the
ty Theatre.
Anderson's appearance in
62 is a double bill featur-
characterization of Lady
for which she has re-
votelevision Emmy awards.
and half of the program
new version of Robinson
"Medea" which won her
idway critics' citation for
s most distinguished per-1

both for guest appearances and
to participate in a lecture series.
Miss Anderson was hailed by
New York Times reviewer Brooks;
Atkinson for "breathing immortal
fire into, Medea in a shattering
performance." She also appeared
in this role when she starred at
the Paris and Berlin Internatj0Y611
Theatre festivals under the man-
agement of Prof. Schnitzer, who
administered the State Depart-
ment's cultural exchange program
for seven years.
Distinguished Lecturer
The Distinguished Lecturer Ser-
ies will be opened with a talk by
Lee Strasberg, founder and direc-
tor of the Actor's Studio. The Ac-
tor's Studio is "the subject of
much controversy in the profes-
sion," Prof. Schnitzer said.
"However, it is still a most im-
portant influence on the actors
and directors in America today."
The studio is for professional,
established .performers, who come
only by invitation to delve more
deeply into the Method school of
acting.
Other lecturers for the series

wil be chosen from leading Broad-
way designers, critics, directors,
producers and playwrights by Prof.
Schnitzer. They will deliver a ser-
ies discussing contemporary thea-
tre problems,.
"We would like also to do a
'playwright in residence' produc-
tion each year;" Prof. Schnitzer
said. "It would be an original
script from either an established
author or a first offering from
someone new. It would be most
meaningful with the author here
to see the play progress from
page to stage," he said.
Society Pk1ns,
Presentation
Of 'Patience'
The Gilbert and Sullivan So-
ciety will hold a mass meeting at
':30 p.m., Monday in the Michi-
gan Union to introduce: their
spring production, "Patience."
Students who are interested in
singing; in the operetta,; playing
in the orchestra, or working be-
hind. the scenes are invited to at-
tend the meeting.,
The :Society will present "P6a-
tience," a parody'on idyllic poets,
April 3-7 at 'the Lydia Mendeis-.
sohn Theater. Several' road tours
are planned, including one to De-
troit.-
Roger. Staples, Grad., and Felix
Pappalardi, '63M1 have been se-
lected dramatics and musical di-
rectors for, the operetta.

Graduates
Receive Aid
From Grant
By DONNA ROBINSON
The National Defense Graduate
Fellowship Program has enabled
2,500 graduate students to pre-
pare themselves for college teach-
ing, according to the program's
two-year report.
The Graduate Fellowship Pro-
gram is authorized under Title IV
of the National Defense Education
Act, with the aim of encouraging
post-graduate study for college
teaching, emphasizing an increase
of doctoral students.
This program is the only fed-
eral program, and the only pro-
gram of any sort except for the
Woodrow Wilson National Fel-
lowship Foundation, which spe-
cifically aims at alleviating the
shortage of college teachers.
Its $9 million in grants have
supported the development of
many new graduate programs and
the expansion of existing ones in
areas of the country where they
are most needed.
The program is designed to aid
relatively underdeveloped areas of
study as well as established ones.
For example, eight fellowships and,
approximately $60,000 in grants
was given to Alfred University to
support its program in ceramics.
These grants have enabled uni-
versities with weak graduate pro-
grams to substantially increase
their capabilities. The University
of Idaho, for example, has initiat-
ed a doctorate program for 44 stu-
dents through aid offered by the
fellowship program.

PROGRAM NOTES:
Dramatic Arts Center Sets
Musical Premier Program

U

"ONCE: A Festival of Musical
Premieres" sponsored by the Dra-
matic Arts Center, will be offered
tonight, Saturday evening and
Sunday afternoon at the First
Unitarian Church.
Concerts will also be held Feb.
16, 17, and 18 in the series.
Organ Recital ...
Sidney Boner, '62SM, will give
an organ recital at 8:30 p.m. in
Hill Auditorium. Boner will play
compositions by Scheidt, Buxte-
hude, Bach, Ahrens, Walcha and
Bruhns.
Choral Union Series...
Russian pianist, Emil Gilels, will
present the eighth concert in the
Choral Union Series 8:30 p.m.
Feb. 13.
The program will include: Mo-
zart's "Sonata in B flat Major,"
Schubert's "Sonata No. 2 in D
major," and Prokofiev's "Sonata
No. 8 in B flat major."
In addition to being a concert
pianist, Gilels teaches at"the Mos-
cow Conservatory of Music.
Harpsichordist...
Fernando Valenti, guest harpsi-
chordist will present a concert at
8:30 p.m. Feb. 14.
Composers on the program in-
clude Frescobaldi, Handel, Soler,
Rameau, Bach and Scarlatti.
Baritone.. .
George Earnshaw, Grad, bari-
tone; will present a voice recital

ixding Personalities
derson is the first of a
utstanding theatre per-
being brought to the
,the Professional Thea-
am of the University,

.UL x
I

ham Lecture Hall. Gilbert Ross,
violin, Gustave Rosseels, violin,
Robert Courte and Jerome Jelinek,
cello, will perform.
Cancelled Concert .. .
Anna Moffo, of the Metropolitan
Opera Company, has been engaged
to replace Leontyne Price for the
final concert in the Extra Series.
Miss Price has been obliged to
cancel her appearance in Hill
Auditorium due to a throat ail-
ment.
The date of this concert has
been changed to Friday evening,
March 9. Tickets held for Leon-
tyne Price, dated March 12, will
be honored for the Anna Moffo
recital at the earlier date.
Death Takes
U' Philosopher
Prof. Paul Henle' of the philoso-
phy department died Jan. 27 in
Paris after an illness of several
weeks.
He was on sabbatical leave from
the University.
Joining the faculty in 1937,
Prof. Henle served as an assistant
professor until 1942 when he en-
tered the. Army. He returned to
the University for one year in
1945 and then served on the
Northwestern University faculty
from 1946 to 1950, holding she
philosophy department chairman-
ship for the last two years.
Prof. Henle returned to the
University as a full professor in
1950. He served as acting chair-
man of the philosophy department
in the summer of 1953, during the
1956-57' school year and during
the spring semester of 1964.'
Holder of a Guggenheim Foun-
dation fellowship in 1948-49, he
spent 1954-55 in France as a Ful-
bright research professor.
Prof. Henle belonged to the
American Philosophy Association
and was a former western division
president. He also held member-
ship in the Association for Sym-
bolic Logic and Phi Beta Kappa
honorary fraternity.

L2

rhe Ann Arl
ITES YOU TO AS
THEATRE AS WE
MYSTERY MELOI
NI
M
F/
by EML
Directed
HEN? ..........
'HERE? ..........
ICE? ...........
JRTAIN TIME? ...
s may be obtained at the
beginn
OFFICE OPENS FEB. 11 a

bor Civic Theatre
SPINE-CHILLING EVENING OF
PRESENT "THE GREATEST
DRAMA EVER WRITTEN."
IGHT I
.*1
ALL,
YN WILLIAMS r
by Bill Hulsopple
..... FEBRUARY 15, 16, 17
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
..........Thursday $1.50,
Friday & Saturday $1.75
Eight O'Clock in the Evening
e Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre Box Office
ing February11.
t 10:00 A.M. TELEPHONE NO 8-6300

'U To Host Lecture Series
On Genetics of Cell Analysis

Seven well known biological
scientists will appear at the Uni-
versity this spring for a lecture.
series on the "Genetic Analysis
of Mammalian Cells."

CONFESSIONS OF A

I

I

FREE!

COWARD'

Sings excerpts from-
his own musical
SAIL AWAY

Safecracking, says Bobble
Whaley, "is a real challenge.'
And he should know. He com-
mitted 43 burglaries while on
the force. In this week's Post,
this "burglar with a badge"
tells why he turned to crime.
How he phonied up police re-
ports.to cover his tracks. Used
official cars for his getaways.
And why he feels his superiors
are the realculprits.
h.Satrda y Evening
FsnsI SU OW ON ~rALS
Subscribe to
The y
Michigan Dily

The talks, which will be open
to students, faculty and public
without charge, will be jointly
financed by the Institute of
Science and Technology, the med-
ical school and the University
Cancer Research Institute.
Prof. Donald J. Merchant, of
the medical school, chairman of
the committee arranging the ser-
ies, said that the program will
open up numerous areas in bacter-
iology.
"Development of this area could
lead to significant advances in
such fields as virology, cancer
research and the study of metab-
olic diseases of man," he noted.
The lecturers will be held at
4 p.m. on various Wednesdays
from February 21 through May.
23 in the Medical Science Build-
ing Amphitheater at the Medical
Center.
The lecturers will be Prof. Fran-
cis Ryan of Columbia University,
Feb. 21; Waclaw Szybalski of the
University of Wisconsin, Feb. 28;
Paul Moorhead of the University
of Pennsylvania, March 14; S. G.
Bradley of the University of Min-
nesota, March 21; Joseph Melnick
of Baylor University at Dallas,.
April 4;,Leonhard Korngold, di-
rector of Immunology at New York
Hospital for Special Surgery, May
14; and Boris Ephrussi of West-
ern Reserve University at Cleve-
land, May 23.

at 8:30 p.m. Thursday in Lane
Hall Auditorium. Earnshaw will
sing works, by Scarlatti, Fedelli,
Bellini, Stradella, Schumann, De-
liges, Chausson, Widor, Faure,
Barber, Head and Menotti.
Earnshaw will be accompanied
by Jane Larkin, Grad, on the
piano.
Recital . .
Arthur Hunkins, Grad, cellist,
will present a concert assisted by
Paul Makara, '62SM, on the violin
and Christine Paraschos, '62SM,
on the piano at 8:30 p.m. Feb. 17
in Lane Hall Aud.
Composers represented will be
Bach, Brahms and Finney.
Degree Recital ...
Sandra Hosmer, '62SM, will pre-
sent a recital on the clarinet at
4:15 p.m. Feb. 18 in Lane Hall
Auditorium. 'Miss Hosmer will be
assisted by Janet Sass on the
piano and Carolyn Lentz on the
viola.
Works by Saint-Saens, Wayne
Barlow, Rakov and Mozart will be
performed.

ANNA MOFFO,
...to sing

11

at,

SC' SHOP HMENTER
210 S. University 304 S. Thayer
NO 3-6922 NO 5-4855

I

THE DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
announces the second annual

0

CE

IOW TIMES

DIAL NO 5-69.90
A DISTINGUISHED ADULT
ENTERTAINMENT
joan
e
F. SCOTT FITZGERAWD'S
24J

A FESTIVAL OF MUSICAL PREMIERES
bringing to Ann Arbor internationally acclaimed
composers and performers of contemporary music
FEBRUARY
9 evening THE NEW YORK AVANT-GARDE
10 evening CHAMBER ENSEMBLE PREMIERES
11 afternoon PAUL JACOBS, pianist*
16 evening ORCHESTRA - WAYNE DUNLAP
17 evening DORIAN WOODWIND QUINTET
18 afternoon ELECTRONIC MUSIC*
evenings at 8:30; Sundays* at 2:30
at the First Unitarian Church
TICKETS: six-concert series $7.50
evening series (4 concerts) $6.00
*afternoon series 2 concerts $3.00
single concerts $2.00
on sale at Bob Marshall's Book Shop
or write: D.A.C., Box 179, Ann Arbor, Mich.

Quartet . .
The Stanley Quartet will per-
form at 8:30 Feb. 21 in the Rack-'
Enrollment Rises
In Public Schools
Secondary and elementary school
enrolment has reached 1,726,000
for the 1961-62 academic year, a
report by the research division of
the Michigan Education Associa-
tion said.
There are 1,070,000 students in.
Michigan's elementary schools and
656,000 in state secondary schools.
Total school enrollment has in-
creased by about 50,000 since last
year. Nationally, school enrollment
has increased by 1.1 million.

racy,
and
highly
ticated."
N.Y.
Workd TeL .
"You
couldn't.
ask
for
more
in one
film."
N Y. Herald Trib.
" A
whale
of a
picture,
Time Mag.I

II

Dialw9,6264
STARRING
JAMES CAGNEY
HORST BUCHHOLZ
ARLENE FRANCIS

Shovws start at
1:00 - 2:45 - 4:50 - 7:00 & 9:10
Feature starts at
1:00 -3:00 -5:05 -7:15 &9:25

So.G.C. Cneaql
*
TON[IGHT at 7 and 9 Saturday and Sunday at 7
Pagnol's first film in 15 years: REBEL WITHOUT A (

I

-.. t... - -" " - -r

WA

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan