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April 17, 1962 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-04-17

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,1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1962 TilE MICHIGAN DAILY

Center Reports Education
Gets Large Share of Grants

A recently released Foundation
Library Center report shows that
education received 54 per cent of
all grants made by the 154 larg-
est foundations/ in the United
States in 1960.
The Foundation's nation - wide
survey indicated that $389 million
was distributed out of the foun-
dations' total assets of $12.3 bil-
lion.
Of the grants, 20 per cent went
for scientific research. This was
an increase of seven per cent over'
the year 1957-58. At the same
time, health and welfare contri-
butions dropped down to 17 per
cent of the total money donated.
(The previous figures were 26 per
cent.)

F. Emerson Andrews, director of
the Foundation Library Center, in-
dicated that he believed the drop
in welfare research was due to the
expansion of Social Security, pri-
vate insurance, welfare funds, re-
tirement plans and the govern-
mental involvement in fields pre-
viously supported by p.r i v a t e
groups.
The 154 foundations that the
center surveys have been estimated
to possess three-fourths of all
foundation assets in the country.
The survey reported on those
foundations which had assets of
$10 million or more.

ANN ARBOR IS A FOLK FESTIVAL
(This Weekend)
WITH SAN FRANCISCO'S JESSE FULLER,
WASHINGTON SQUARE'S BOB DILLAN,
& NUMEROUS OTHER ILLUMINATIONS FROM THE
GREEN PASTURES OF
MSU, WSU, U OF WISCONSIN, BERLIN,
CHICAGO, ETC.

Set Frosh
Weekend
Strateg
By MYRNA ALPERT
Under a cold war agreement to
refrain from opening fire until a
specially designated time, the
Maize and Blue teams have been
eecretly planning the offensive
they will take when the battle
begins. The team with the best
laid strategy will be declared the
winner of Frosh Weekend.
As the war warms up and the
fighting begins, the two teams will
be competing with each other to
see who can produce the most
original publicity. The purpose of
this activity is to give hints to
the rest of the students of the
theme that has been chosen to
represent each team.
A specific object has been select-
ed to characterize each theme, and
the Maize and Blue will do every-
thing in their power to see to it
that their's becomes a well known
sight :on campus. Their activities
will range from WCBN dedica-
tions which subtly indicate the
nature of their object, to the plac-
ing of replicas of them in often'
traversed places.
The climax will come May 5 at
the Frosh Weekend dance.
The Blue team made the first
attack last Friday when it fought
a small skirmage by putting on a
skit on the diag. The Maize team
was quick to retaliate yesterday
afternoon when it presented its
first skit.-
Last year, using Blueshevik Rev-
olution as the subject for their spy
theme, the Blue team won the
highest number of points out of
a possible 100.
Howell To Speak
On Anthropology
Prof. F. Clark Howell of the
University of Chicago anlthropol-
ogy department will speak on
"Some Recent Developments in
Knowledge of the Earliest Homin-
ids in Africa" at 4:10 p.m. today
in Aud. B.

By THOMAS HUNTER
Prof. Albert H. Hourani, Oxford's
director of Middle Eastern Stud-
ies, traced the gradual develop-
ment of the concept of the secular
Arab nation-state beginning with
the late eighteenth century belief
in identity between Islamic relig-
ious and temporal state.
Speaking on "Modern Arab Po-
litical Thought," Prof. Hourani
said last night that the dominant
current of Islam thought held that

even an unjust ruler should be
obeyed, because a despotic govern-
ment was thought better than an-
archy.
The benevolent ruler was one
who "strove toward justice and at
the same time regulated the or-
der of the community and the
state" -which had been set down
by great codes of law.
Begin Self-Government
At the end of the Russo-Turkish
war, at the turn of the nineteenth
century, the more distant prov-
inces began dropping away to gov-
ern themselves. Non-Islamic groups
were less willing to retain their
position of subordination and
pressed denial of the claim of the
Ottoman Sultan as the real pro-
tector of the people.
Prof. Hourani said that in its at-
tempt to reassert its authority
within the empire, the central gov-
ei:nment borrowed some of the
techniques of the rebelling forces,
thereby exposing its youth to Eu-
ropean customs and ideas.
From the middle nineteenth
century, political thought was de-
voted to justifying these changes.
Achieve Well-Being
The function of the ruler be-
came not only that of maintain-
ing the will of God, but to achieve
the well-being of the people, which
was by now identified with mater-
ial progress. Love of country re-
mained a basis for political edu-
cation.
Technological advances put Is-
lam on a rational basis. Islam be-
came reason itself, the way to bas-
ic truth, Prof. Hourani said. Is-
lam remained the true religion,
but its social teachings were re-
garded as of another time.
At the beginning of the 20th
Century, political theorists still
maintained that religion must be a
basis of - education, that society
must be grounded in ethical con-
viction, but a new belief that the
Islamic was not necessarily the
strongest state had penetrated the
strong Arab nationalism.

Hourani Notes Trend
Of Islamic Thought_

'

Only

5 more.days

to petition for the new
Positions Available
Male & Female General Chairmen
Male & Female Directors
Pick up your petition in the
Leagse Undergraduat? Office
*Junior CLASS Play

PROF. ALBERT H. HOURANI
... Islamic culture
JAZZ TRIO:
'U' .Students
Win .Awards
In Festival
A trio, two of its members Uni-
versity student, won the finest
jazz group award and five other
prizes in the 1962 Collegiate Jazz
Festivalcompetition last weekend
at the University of Notre Dame.
Competing against 24 midwest-
ern college jazz groups, the Bob
James Trio, headed by Robert
James, Grad, with Robert Pozar,
64SM, and Ronald Brooks, a Jan-
uary graduate of Eastern Michigan
University, also won the best com-
bo award and four individual
awards.
As a result of their performance
at the festival, the group will make
a record for a major recording
company this June.

ORGAN IZATION available In April, May, and Ju
Apply a University Family Houi
Office. 2364 Bishop Street, Nor
Campus, or phone 662-3169 or 6
NOTICES 1511, ext. 3569.
Congregational Disc. E & R Stud- RENAISSANCE HOUSE
Guild, Cost Luncheon Discussion: "
View of Religion," C. Grey Auston, New Greenwich Village Theater
April 17, Noon, 802 Monroe. and Art Center.
German Club, Coffee Hour, German Opening September. Room and
Conversation, Music, Singing-"Herz- board $27-$32.50 per week.
lich wilikommen," April 18, 2-4 p.m.,
FB. Apply 160 Bleecker St., NYC
U. of M. Folk Dancers, Meeting, In- REAL ESTATE
struction, Dancing, April 17, 7:30 p.m.,
1429 Hill. STUDIO-800 sq. it., Music, Dance, :
* * * ducing, Ceramic, large assembly rc
Wesleyan Guild, Holy Communion 33x15, 4 smaller rooms, over Pret
(Chapel) followed by Breakfast (Pine Bell, 2-5 year lease. Will sell ent
Rin.), April 18, 7 a.m., Over in time for building of 3 floors. Call Lansing,
8 a.m. classes, 1st Meth. Church. 7-9305.
500 YDS. FROM UNION
Ann Arbor's most deluxe and spacious apts.
Ready for June and Sept. occupancy
Completely, air conditioned for three or four
If you are responsible people-
applications now being accepted
PHONE NO 3-6357

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