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April 03, 1962 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-04-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PA '"

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAI~ ~

rrnl7Li A

Sukarno

Claims Attack

*

*

*

*

*

*

Syria Asks

To Reunite'

With Nassar' s Regime
After Army Rebellion

CON-CON CAUCUS:
Republicans Seek
'Rights' Solution
LANSING (P)--Republican leaders of the Constitutional Conven-
tion met in secret yesterday to hammer out a compromise on a pro-
posed State Civil Rights Commission.
The commission was provided for in a strongly worded proposal
tentatively approved by the committee-of-the-whole last week. The
proposal spells out broad powers for the commission.
Some of the conservative Republicans, however, balked at the
detailed listing of powers that would be included in the constitution
Cif the full convention were to
adopt the provision.
Race Issue Caucus
A general Republican caucus lat-
iTT er approved changes described by
ellate leaders as clarifying and improv-
ing the original proposal. '
They tentatively put their stamp
WASHINGTON (P)-A move to of approval on:
deny Federal funds to some segre- -Expanding membership of the
gated schools seems likely to be- bi-partisan commission from four
come the John F. Kennedy ad- to eight.
ministration's answer to dimming -Requiring the commission to
prospects for major civil rights go through the courts to issue
action in Congress this year. subpoenas.

Senate Democratic leader Mike
Mansfield of Montana said yester-
day he will honor his promise to
call up in the Senate this month a
bill to make a sixth grade educa-
tion the maximum permissible lit-
eracy requirement for voting in
elections for Federal office.
While Mansfield would make no
predictions on the outcome, there,
were increasing signs that South-
ern opponents may be able to keep
the Senate from even considering
this measure.
The Southerners have been put
on notice by Secretary Abraham A.
Ribicoff that the Health, Educa-
tion and Welfare Department in-
tends to try to cut off federal
funds for the education at segre-
gated schools of children living on
federal property.
Ribicoff, disclosed also that the
Department of Justice soon may
file suits seeking desegregation of
schools in the so-called federally
impacted areas which receive sub-
stantial United States aid because
of population influx 'traceable to
federal activities.

uemove Cause
-Removing a clause making
commission members ineligible for
any other elective or appointive
post while on the commission and
for two years thereafter.
-Limiting the scope of its jur-
isdiction to questions of discrimi-
nation because of race, religion,
color or national origin.
-Striking out references to
rights to equal opportunity in edu-
cation, employment, housing and
accommodations, since these al-
ready are listed in the constitu-
tion.
India Releases
Voting Results
NEW DELHI (P)-The election
commission formally announced
yesterday the results of 489 par-
liamentary contests in February's
general elections.
The remainder went to smaller
parties and independents.

Ref erendumn
To Decide
Final Action
Leaders Ignore
Rival Broadcast
BEIRUT (R)--Syria's ruling jun-
ta offered President Nasser an
olive branch yesterday after north-
er army officers announced a
rebellion and demanded reunion
with the United Arab Republic.
Six anti - Nasser officers in
Syria's six-day-old military junta
were reported being snipped into
exile in a move to avert civil war.
Later reports said a compromise
ending the Aleppo uprising against
the junta was near.
The final decision on reunifi-
cation will rest with a popular
referendum, a broadcast by the
junta said.
The junta, which led Syria out
of the UAR Sept. 28, ignored rebel
broadcasts from Aleppo claiming
control of Northern Syria, threat-
ened stiff punishment for trouble-
makers, and closed land and sea
frontiers.
Statement
But the same military leaders
who last September accused Nas-
ser of tyranny and of converting
Syria into a prison, put out this
statement over the radio in the
Syrian capital of Damascus:
"The high command of the arm-
ed forces explained that it believes
in unity with all liberated Arab
countries, and first of all with
Egypt, provided this unity is es-
tablished on a genuine basis and
with conditions guaranteeing the
dignity of this country and its
entity and avoiding the mistakes
of the past-on the condition that
these conditions are decided in a
popular free referendum."
Avert War .
Striving to avert open civil war,
junta leaders were reported try-
ing to find civilian politicians to
head a compromise government.
Among those approached was de-
posed President Nazem El Koudsi.
He declined.
Conferences were reported un-
der way between the junta and
the rebel officers to find a solu-
tion. Sources in Damascus said
demands of the pro-Nasser group
included:
Exile from Syria of several of
the architects of the Sept. 28 coup;
formation of a new 41-man mili-
tary council to replace the revolu-
tionary high command; formation
of a civilian cabinet to negotiate
ties with Egypt.
Say Prisoners
Alive in Laos

Indonesians
Land Troops
At 3 Points
New Negotiations
Appear Imminent
JAKARTA () -- Indonesia re-
ported yesterday its guerrillas had
landed at three points in West New
Guinea.
At the same time, government
sources predicted that, under Unit-
ed States pressure, talks soon will
be resumed with the Netherlands
in the island dispute.
Defense Minister Abdul Haris
Nasution, reporting the guerrilla
landings, asserted "our navy and
air force are patrolling along the
beaches."
He said the infiltrators went
ashore at the oil port of Sorong
on the northwest tip of New Gui-
nea, at Fakfak, on the southwest
coast, and at Kaimana in the
south. The Dutch have acknowl-
edged landings in all these areas
except Sarong but said the infil-
trators are being wiped out.
Ba Faith
Speaking to a meeting of univer-
sity students at Bandung, Nasu-
tion accused the Dutch of bad
faith in the negotiations in Wash-
ington which were suspended last
week.
The session was called at Wash-
ington's urging after Indonesia
threatened to use force to back
up its claim to West New Guinea.
Nasution asserted the Dutch used
the talks as a delaying tactic while
building up their military forces
in West New Guinea.
To Negotiate
Sources close to President Su-
karno said, however, he will agree
to resume the negotiations be-
cause of international pressure
and because he is impressed by
President John F. Kennedy's per-
sonal interest in the dispute.
But these sources made clear
there would be no weakening of
Sukarno's insistence that adminis-
tration of West New Guinea be
turned over to Indonesia.

Ask Tests
Of Missile'
Systems
WASHINGTON (A) - Defense1
officials say that the Joint Chiefs
of Staff have requested White!
House permission to conduct a!
variety of nuclear detonations in-
cluding air tests of complete weap-i
ons systems.
This was disclosed in a censored
transcript released by the House
Appropriations Committee of tes-
timony taken in closed session.
Maj. Gen. R. H. Booth, director
of the Defense Atomic Support
Agency, said President John F.
Kennedy told the operating forces
to "go ahead and prepare for these
things."
Booth replied "not to my knowl-
edge," when asked whether Ken-
nedy had given a final go-ahead
to conduct "the shot list that went
to the White House for specific
approval."
Booth said that the tests which
the '"joint chiefs are interested in
are the entire system." He agreed
with a comment by Rep. Gerald
R. Ford (R-Mich) that this meant
they would be "fired by operations'
crews, from operational bases, with
full weapons from beginning to
end."
Much of Booth's testimony was
omitted from the published record,
but remaining excerpts pointed to-
ward a desire for complete tests
of intercontinental ballistic mis-
siles and Polaris missiles launched
from submarines.
Polaris and intercontinental test
missiles have been test-launched
many times, but none has ever
been fired with a nuclear warhead
et to detonate.
Booth explained that his agen-
cy worked up "an extensive series
of tests drawn up in the event
nuclear testing in the atmosphere
would be resumed."
He said these plans went to the
joint chiefs and the defense di-
rector of research and planning
and "the plan then goes to the
White House.'3,
He said this was also the re-
quired procedure for the under-
ground test series which the Atom-
ic Energy Commission has been
conducting for several months.

WASHINGTON (M-)-The Senate
turned a critical eye on the United
Nations yesterday before voting on
a multimillion dollar loan to help
the world organization out of a fi-
nancial bind.
Approval of the bipartisan com-
promise loan proposal was expect-
ed by overwhelming vote. Al-
though the pending legislation is
labeled a compromise, it actually
would give President John F. Ken-
nedy virtually what he asked.
The General Assembly's value
as a forum for thunder on great
issues is fading, Sen. Mike Mans-
field (D-Mont) said, and it is be-
coming "increasingly a market-
place for a trading of votes" and
"the transmission of trivial poli-
tics on a vast and international
scale."
As for the Security Council,
Mansfield said that due to'Russian
vetoes the Security Council has
made "only minor contributions to
order and stability" during the
past dozen years.
Mansfield said there is growing
concern that most of the critical
decisions in the United Nations,
such as its decisions to go into the
Congo and the Middle East, have
been reached on the basis of "one-
state one-vote procedure" in the
General Assembly.
Refusal of the Soviet bloc and
other nations to pay their assess-
ments for the Congo and Middle'
East efforts brought about the UN
financial plight.
Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey (D-
Minn) said in a statement the
Army Accepts
Guido Cabinet;
Pow/er Unsure
BUENOS AIRES (P--With the
army at his elbow, President Jose
Maria Guido picked new members
yesterday for a cabinet he hopes
can ride out Argentina's political
storm.
But his own party turned on
him and demanded the. return of
ousted President Arturo Frondizi.
The toughening stand of the
dominant intransigent radicals,
Frondizi's'party from which Guido
resigned in accepting the presi-
dency, raised serious doubts that
the new regime could control con-
gress.
Guido's task was to pick a cab-
inet acceptable to the military
leaders, who ousted Frondizi last
Thursday, and to his old party
and opposition parties whose votes
will be needed when congress con-
venes May 1.

v\

United Nations should seek new
sources of revenue independent of
member contributions. He said the
United Nations should lay claim
to tax rights in such areas as
space, the oceans, and polar re-
sources.
The proposal before the Senate
was sponsored jointly by Mansfield

and Sen. Everett M. Dirksen of
Illinois, the Republican leader,
and was approved by President
Kennedy.
It would authorize the President
to negotiate terms and conditions
under which the United States
could lend up to $100 million to
the United Nations.

SPECIAL PROGRAMS:
Educators Urge Schools
To SumHelpSumChildren
WASHINGTON (P)-A group of leading educators urged yester-
day that the public schools design an educational plan especially
tailored for the children of the slums.
The educational policies commission said the type of schooling
suitable for most middle-class children is not appropriate for those
whose homes are characterized by poverty, disease, instability or con-
flict.
The commission, sponsored by the National Education Association
and the American Association of School Administrators, set forth its
views in a report, "Education and the Disadvantaged American."
The school must make every effort to help the disadvantaged
child sense that education has some meaning for him, the report said.
The commission said "if present trends are not reversed, half the
inhabitants of the large of city of 1970 may be disadvantaged-per-
sons unable to participate constructively in their society."
The disadvantaged persons generally forced off the land by
mechanization, the report said, migrate to the big cities in five con-
tinuing streams: Negroes from the rural south, hill whites from the
Appalachian uplands, Puerto Ricans, Mexican-Americans, and reserva-
tion Indians.
"Ironically," it said, "the services designed to help them most-
education, public health, police and fire protection, sanitation, and
public welfare-often appear arbitrary and undesirable to the dis-
advantaged . . . The disadvantaged citizen tends to look on the police
not as the protector of law and order but as an armed enemy."

Senators Air UN Views
As Bond Ballot Nears

world News Roundup
By The Associated Press
ALGIERS-The French army said yesterday it captured about 40
Secret Army commandos in a battle in the Quarensis Mountains south
of Orleansville.
WASHINGTON-The chairman of the Republican National Com-

discount records, inc.
SPRING
CLEARANCE
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mittee asked all Republican members
him in co-sponsoring a bill for --
hospital and medical care for the
aged.
WASHINGTON-President John
F. Kennedy sent Congress yester-
day budget changes that would
result in a net increase of $4,735,-
000 for the bookkeping year.
WASHINGTON-President John
F. Kennedy announced yesterday
the establishment of a bureau of
outdoor recreation
GENEVA - Four middle group
nations in the Geneva disarma-
ment conference expressed regret
and annoyance yesterday at the
inability of the big powers to agree
on a nuclear weapons test ban.
NEW YORK-The stock market
declined irregularly yesterday in
quiet trading. Sixty-five stocks on
the Dow - Jones Averages were
down 0.74.

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