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April 03, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-04-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ESDAY

ComposerSees New Trend

CHALLENGE:
Speakers Prognosticate
Future Position of 'U'

p l liilI ;!i1' Dial 2-6264
r" IIW II ~ill~~r7,

- ENDING TONIGHT '
"WHERE THE BOYS ARE"
at 2:50 -6:20 & 9:50
TEALSO
"THE GAZEBO"
at 1:10 - 4:40 - 8:10

Ussachevsky went on to discuss
the use of electronic music in
conjunction with the human voice,
and demonstrated this concept
with a few examples. This idea
originated with the Musique Con-
crete, which "was never afraid of
being humorous."
Ussachevsky went on to discuss
the composer of electronic music
in more general terms. He said
that such a composer should have
the ability and the willingness to
learn the materials of this new
medium and should not be afraid
to experiment.
The medium of electronic music
is very flexible, he added, and
there are an infinite number of

directions which can be taken
with a given source of material.
Ussachevsky lamented the fact
that there were only two loud-
speakers on hand over which to
play the selections he had for
illustrative purposes, and said that
for full effect there should have
been two loudspeakers in the back
of the auditorium as well.
Ussachevsky concluded his dis-
cussion with a brief mention of
the "prospects" referred to in the
title of the lecture, saying that
there is little reason why elec-
tronic music cannot have the same
lasting significance as the major
works of the past.

w STARTS WEDNESDAY *

0-

ZAHARAT ARA ANAM
. classes and cobras
Dancer Puts

YD CONVENTION:
Panel Discussion Cites
State Financial Growth

,,

By JAMES NICHOLS
"Economic Growth in Michigan"
was the subject of a panel discus-
sion Saturday as the state con-
vention of Young Democrats met
to explore issues important to the
1962 election campaign.
Speaking to the assembly at the
Michigan Union were Rep. Gilbert
Bursley (R-Ann Arbor), chairman
of the Joint Legislative Committee
on Economic Growth; Roblee B.
Martin, chairman of the Michi-
gan Industrial Ambassadors; and
Prof. Daniel R. Fusfeld of the
economics department.
Committee Hearings
Bursley based his recommenda-
tions on the hearings of his com-
mittee. He said Michigan business-
men find the present business ac-
tivities tax "most inequitable."
They will admit the cost of
workman's compensation and un-
employment in Michigan is not the
nation's highest, but they are con-
cerned about interpretations which
they feel are stacked against them,
he added.I
He urged fiscal reform, restat-
ing his formula of "adequacy, per-
manency, and equity" in Michi-
gan's tax structure. Bursley also
called a state-wide credit organi-
zation "a vital necessity."
Abolish Tax
Martin agreed with Bursley that
the business activities tax should
be abolished and the personal
property tax reformed. But Mich-
igan's tax burden has been built
up beyond the proportion it de-
serves, he said.
The Great Lakes and the Sti.
Lawrence Seaway "connect Michi-
gan with ' the markets of the
world," he said. His cement plant
is able to compete with plants
on both coasts and in Hawaii. He
praised Michigan's highway pro-
gram, and "the aggressiveness and
progressiveness of Michigan's rail-
roads."

many companies knock the state."
Spokesmen for Michigan should
"extoll its virtues, not its short-
comings." "We need more of Tex-
as' attitude," he said.
Prof. Fusfield saw a loss of em-
ployment in the state's auto indus-
tries due to automation and de-
centralization, but said Michigan's
economy is "growing and expand-
ing rather well in other areas."
"The great bulk of unemploy-
ment resulted from a decline ir
the number of workers employed
to fill defense contracts. But for
this decline, the unemployment
level in Michigan would be "down
to or even below national levels,"
he said.
G&S Society
To Perform
'Patience'
The curtain goes up on "Pa-
tience" or "Bunthorne's Bride,"
this evening at 8:30 in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre, commenc-
ing the April 3-6 showing of the
Gilbert and Sullivan operetta pre-
sented by the G & S Society.
"Patience," a satire on the
aesthetic craze of the 1880's, pre-
sents a "Fleshy Poet" and an
"Idyllic Poet," Bunthorne and
Grosvenor, who are rivals for the
affections of the milkmaid, Pa-
tience.
A train of languid ladies and
their former flames, a Colonel,, a
Duke, and a Major, with a regi-
ment of officers of the Dragoon
Guards, complete the picture.
Patience, having been told that
love must be absolutely unselfish,
has to reject the perfect Grosvenor
(Archibald the All-Right) and ac-
cept the very imperfect Bunthorne.
Grosvenor, cast off by Patience,
is adored by the twenty love-sick
maidens. When he is coerced by
Bunthorne and Lady Jane, a
"Mother Hubbard" type, to dis-
card aestheticism, the ladies do
likewise, explaining that Archibald
the All-Right cannot possibly be
All-Wrong.
Patience, still the idealist, is now
free to marry Archibald, since het
is no longer perfect. Bunthorne,
crushed, decides to wed Lady
Jane, his one remaining adorer.
However, Jane has consented to
marry the Duke, a very ordinary
young man who has decided to
choose a lady who is distinctly
plain, viz., Jane, so-that "Nobody
is Bunthorne's Bride!"
Tickets for any of the April 3-6
performances may be obtained
now at Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES

New Twist
In Goodwill
By BUEL TRAPNELL
"I dance because I love dancing
and because 3 want to spread good
will for my country," Zaharat Ara
Anam of Pakistan says.
Zaharat, who is working on a
master's degree in political theory,
left Ann Arbor Sunday for Holly-
wood, where she will be the first
person ever to represent Pakistan
in the annual International Folk
Dance Festival.
Billed on the program as the
"first dancer of Pakistan," ("that's
a little too much"), she will do a
traditional folk dance with a
"cobra" made by the University's
Television Center.
Meet Walt Disney
While she is in Hollywood, she
will appear on radio and televi-
sion shows, and has been asked to
give some speeches about her na-
tive land. She will also visit mo-
tion picture studios and meet with
Walt Disney.
Zaharat took lessons in both
folk and classical dancing until
she was 15 years old, when her
parents asked her to quit and de-
vote more time to her studies.
But when she came to the Unit-
ed States nearly two years ago,
she saw an opportunity to give
many Americans their first intro-
duction to Pakistani culture.
Extreme Boats,
Now, although she admits that
her love for both political science
and dancing "make me feel like I
am in two extreme boats," she
dances whenever she can find the
time, and has appeared in Denver,
Washington, D.C., and Chicago
and other cities in the United
States and Canada.
Zaharat plans to travel to the
South, the only part of the United
States she hasn't yet seen, and
she may go to Europe this sum-
mer. She wants to get a master's
in dramatic arts, and then return
to her alma mater, Dacca Univer-
sity in East Pakistan, to teach poli-
tical science.
She is considering professional
acting or dancing. Some time in
the future she is going to write
a book on her impressions of the
United States.
Court Justice
To Judge Trial
Justice Potter Stewart of the
United States Supreme Court will
serve as one of five judges in to-
morrow's championship round of
the Law School's 38th annual
Campbell Competition.
Arguing a hypothetical case in-
volving whether the use of wire-
tapping or eavesdropping with
modern electronic devices by state
police is illegal or unconstitu-
tional, four law school juniors will
be competing.
Besides Justice Stewart, Judge
Sterry R. Waterman of the United
States Court of Appeals, Detroit
Police Commissioner and former
state Supreme C o u r t Justice
George Edwards, Dean Allan F.
Smith of the Law School and Prof.
B. J. George of the Law School
will be judges.
See Bunthorne
0RAFFLED
"By the advice of
the Solicitor
in

UPATIENCE
April 3-6 8:30 P.M.
Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre

By RONALD WILTON
Predictions on "The Future of
the University of Michigan" were
made by Regent James D. Thur-
ber, Prof. Charles F. Lehmann, as-
sistant dean of the education
school, and Robert Lusk - of the
Automobile Manufacturers Asso-
ciation at the Challenge program
Sunday afternoon.
Prof. Lehmann explained that
the future could be viewed in two
perspectives. "It can be thought of
as an extension of the past and
present or as a clean white slate."
He laid out four propositions for
the future. "Research will turn
progressively to what we want to
do including research on ourselves.
Secondly, there will a more reflec-
tive life for students and profes-
sors.
New Definition
"There will be a new definition
of relationships between us and
society. Finally, there will be a-
more intimate and durable associ-
ation between faculty and stu-
dents."
He cited the need for a release
of positive leadership and assert-
ed that without it the University
"faced with problems of size and
complexity, will sink lower into
its own paralysis."
Lusk predicted that there would
be a "continued examination and
modification of the credit system.
He also saw greater creativity in
teaching.
"Without this creativity the
University is pretty much a waste
of time. More could be learned by
students in basemiant libraries
than from teachers who do not
have creativity and knowledge."
He foresaw a "tremendous rise
in the use of programmed learn-
ineducational television and
films.
He cited "frightening studies of
student conformity" and added
that if the students commitment

to truth and challenge could be
strengthened "the University will
have increased its greatness and
reacted to the challenge of the
future."
Fears Groundless
Thurber said that fears that the
quality of undergraduates will be
lower in the future were ground-
less as "the Regents have spoken
out for the need of a dynamic un-
dergraduate body."
In answering the question as to
what percentage of students in!
1970 will be from out of state he
asserted that "we are firmly com-
mitted to maintaining a cosmopol-
itan atmosphere. It is greatly to
the University's advantage to
maintain this."
He said -that there must be a
growing acceptance and support of
the University's needs. "The pres-
tige of the University is not based
on the quality of its undergradu-
ates but on its faculty and advanc-
ed programs. This is not under-
stood in the state and the Legis-
lature."

EElA KAZAN'S PRODUCTION OFF
THWASS
WRO TE FOR 11t SCREtN BI
NATALIE WOOD
w,. PAT HINGLE AUDREY CHRISTIE
A4N INTOOU.CtNQ
WALRREN BEATTYm
TECHNICOLOR WARNER BROSMA
A ALSO
NOMINATED FOR 5 ACADEMY

"JOSHUA
LOGAN
PRODUCTION
LESLIE CARON."MAURICE CHEVALIER
- -CHARLES BOYER-HORST BUCHHOLZ
TECHNICOLOR*FrmWARNER BROS.

NATALIE WOOD
NOMINATED FOR
BEST ACTRESS

AWARDS

4

OPENS TONIGHT
University of Michigan
Gilbert & Sullivan Society
is presenting
PATIENCE"
or
BUNTHORNES BRIDE

*Junior CLASS Play
Natalie Wood:
te Ilamboyant
movie uiueens
On screen or off, Natalie Wood is a
Star with a capital "S." In this
week's Post, you'll read how Natalie
carries on in the glittering tradition
of Pola Negri. How she makes box-
office hay out of unsavory scandals.
And what was behind the breakup
of her marriage to Robert Wagner.
2%e Saturday Evening
POST
APRIL 7 RSSUE NOW ON SALE .

April

3,

4.9 5,

6

Lydia Mendelssohnl tTheatre
8:,30 P.M.
Tickets available at Box Of fice

Too Many Knocks
Martin complained that

"too

TOMORROW at 8
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
presents
DR. MARVIN FELHEIMi Assoc. Prof. of English

April5-

3-6

Tues., $125; Wed., Thurs., $1.50; Fri., $1.75

The 6th and final Lecture in the Series
"An Inquiry into The Jew in Western Civilization"
41 Are Welcome 1429 Hill St.

.
C - R- -1
i

I

THE NEW YORKER

(changed from Wednesday)

I

I

Challenge: Seminar, "The Future of
the University of Michigan," April 3,#
7:30 p.m., UGLI, Honors Lounge.
Chess Club, Meeting, Distribution of
Prizes for Tournament -Winners, April
4, 7:30 p.m., Union, Rms. 3MN. Re-
freshments.
* * *
Congr. Disc. E & R Stud. Guild,
Luncheon Discussion: "Christian View
of Man," Rev. E. Ransom, Meth. Cam-I
pus Minister, April 3, Noon, 802 Monroe.
Human Relations Bd., Film: "Walk in
My Shoes," April 3, 7:00-8:15-9:30 p.m.
showings, Alice Lloyd; Aprii 4, 7:30
showing, W. Quad., Dining Rm.
* * *
Ulir Ski Club, Meeting, April 4, 7:30
p.m., Union.
#* . *
U. of M. Folk Dancers, Meeting, In-
struction & Dancing, April 3, 7:30 p.m.,
1429 Hill.
Wesleyan Guild, Open House, April
3, 8-11 p.m., 602 E. Huron; Holy Com-
munion followed by breakfast, April 4,
7 a.m., 1st Meth. Church, Chapel.
. * .*
German Club, CoffeerHour, April 4,
2-4 p.m., 4072 FIB. German conversa-
tion, music, singing-"Herzlich will-C
kommen"

T1E ..EATI E
0{

4R

eople,'makes a lively, funny Sir Peter-
a clever, sophisticated man in a ridicu-
lous position-
costumes, by Lloyd Burhngame, are

just right, and so are his sets), lull of
pouts and affectation. All the actors
move and speak well; nothing is hit too
hard, and nothing goes to waste, either.

I

r

OFF BROADWAY

HE Association of Producing
Artists, a repertory group that has
been in existence for several years
and has played in other parts of the
country, has opened its first season here
with a most enjoyable production of
"The. School for Scandal,"
The staging, by Ellis Rabb,
is so original, quick, and stylish, always
enhancing and clarifying but never in-
terfering with the play. The cur-
tains are transparent and behind them
actors dressed as liveried servants set up
each successive scene; then the principals
get started, and by the time the curtains
have parted the scene is already under
way. Thus, the action is continuous but

neatly punctuated. The company is very
good, and is lucky to have, in Rosemary
Harris, a really charming and accom-
plished actress. Her Lady Teazie is
young, witty, and ingenuous-always
the country girl come to town. Miss
Harris appears to take to the part effort-
lessly, and in the scenes - with Lady
Sneerwell, Mrs. Candour, -Crabtree,
and Sir Benjamin Backbite-that
croaking chorus of scandalmongers--
she is, in all her frivolity, so elegant that
she seems at least a cut and three-quar-
ters above her companions. "Volatile
and gay" are Sheridan's own words for
Lady Teazle, in the epilogue that com-
bines the character's farewell to London
with the actress's farewell to her audi-
PnP hn...enditvcn. . nv nyd-

The play, for all its satiric intent, is
ood-humored and delightful, but sure-
ly you don't need me to tell you that.

-AND-

I

f 4

'RIEW

At

0

WORKSHOP

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