100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 24, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-03-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

cholars

Probe

Education, Politics

)unbar Tells
If University
slected Boards
By ROBERT SELWA
Michigan is unique among states
its system of higher education,
of. Willis F. Dunbar, head of
e history department at West-
n Michigan University, said yes-
rday.
"Michigan stands almost alone
choosing by popular election so
any of its governing boards of
ucation institutions. And it is
ique in other ways too," he
Id the Michigan Academy of
;ience, Arts and Letters.
Prof. Dunbar pointed out that
recent survey of 209 state boards
owed that 70 per cent of their
embers are appointed, 18 per
nt elected, and 12 per cent ex-
ficio. Of the 18 per cent elect-
, almost one-half are chosen
the state legislature, not the
ople.
Regents Elected
(The Regents, the trustees of
ichigan State University and
e governors of Wayne State Uni-
rsity are elected at large.)
Prof. Dunbar said Michigan is
stinctive in several other aspects
its constitutional provisions for
gher education:
The state provides in its con-
tution for more than one ma-
r state university. Only three
her states do so.
The presidents are chosen by
e' governing boards of the uni-
rsities and preside over these
ards.
No other state constitution spe-
ically makes the president of a
iversity chosen by a governing
ard the presiding officer of that
yard.
"A city manager does not pre-
le at meetings of a city' coun-
1The manager of an industry
es not preside at meetings of
> board of directors," Prof. Dun-
r pointed out.
Less Than Four
Not more than four other state
astitutions give governing boards

i

UNIQUE SITUATION-Regents Irene B. Murphy and Carl C.
Brablec confer with Vice-President and Director of the Dearborn
,Center William Stirton. Two Regents are elected for eight year
terms in biennial elections.

the extensive powers of control
and supervision that Michigan's
does.
Only 21 state constitutions pro-
vide for a state university, for an
agricultural college and 12 for
teachers' colleges, Michigan's con-
stitution provides for all of these.
Prof. Dunbar suggested that
Michigan's unique higher educa-
tion policies result from the suc-
cess of the University following
the state's 1850 constitution.
He noted that the University
had been suffering from various

troubles including fiscal misad-
ventures, too much legislative and
political interference, a bitter con-
troversy over the recognition of
fraternities and a decline in en-
rollment.
Conventional Solution
Prof. Dunbar said the solution
arrived at by the convention of
1850; was to make the Board of
Regents elective, to constitute it a
body corporate, to give it super-
vision of the University and con-
trol of its expenditures and to re-
quire it to elect a president with
strong powers.

1

SGC STATEMENT:

Ask Con-Con To Lower
Voting Age by 3 Years

By MARJORIE BRAHMS

lower the
18 years.

Michigan voting age toI

Student Government Counci
cently adopted a statement uri
the Constitutional Convention

i re-

Tomorrow
ILLEL jointly with the Beth Israel Centel
presents
DR. ELLIS RIVKIN
Prof. of History
Hebrew Union College - Jewish Institute of Religion
in two Lectures
10:00 A.M. "Jewish History: Myth and Reality"
7:30 P.M. "Judaism and a World in Crisis"

All Invited

1429 Hill St.

S.G.C.
Chnepua (quild
TONIGHT and Sunday at 7 and 9:15
THE CAPTAIN'S
PARADISE

ging The statement holds that "not
n to only is the 18-year-old directly af-
fected by government policies, but,
more important, he has interest
and knowledge concerning gov-
ernment affairs."
r Further rationale for the request
is that citizens 18 years old have
direct experience with government
decisions through military service,
judicial procedures, education,
taxes, and driving.
Better Prepared
High school courses in govern-
ment, the political process, history
and citizenship as well as the com-
munications media offer the 18-
year-old better preparation for
intelligent voting than previously
afforded citizens of any age
group.
These courses, coupled with po-
litical clubs and discussion groups,
"sparks the 18-year old's inter-
est in public affairs and in his
responsibilities as a, citizen," it
notes.
Although qualified, the 18 year
old is neither encouraged nor al-
lowed to vote. "The interest,
knowledge and understanding of
the 18-year-old should not degen-
erate into the apathy that re-
sults naturally from non-partici-
pation. It shoild be the beginning
of active, continuing participation
in public affairs," the statement
concludes.
Regents' Rules
Students are subject to rules
made by the Regents, an elected
board, Kenneth Miller, '64, chair-
man of the Committee on Student
Concerns, said.
If students could have a vote,
they could participate more direct-
ly in the election of rule-making
people who affect them.
The Council has urged' other
student governments in Michigan
to take similar action by sending{
letters on the issue to delegates to
the Constitutional Convention and
the Legislature.

Bacon Gives
Automation
Information
By JAMES NICHOLS
A complex framework to analyze
the effect of technological devel-,
opments on Michigan firms and
eventually to aid manufacturers
in adopting a profitable strategy
was outlined yesterday before the1
economic section of the Michigan]
Academy of Science, Arts and Let-
ters.
The 20-page paper concerned
the aims and methods of the In-,
dustrial Research Program of the1
Institute of Science and Technol-,
ogy. It was presented by Program,
Director Frank R. Bacon, Jr., and
Research Associate Frederick T.o
Sparrow.4
The program was established to1
"study means by which science
and technology might be more ef-
fectively utilized to promote the1
growth of Michigan industry."
Resources Necessary 1
Technological resources are nec-
essary to the development of new
industrial products, the paper
said. These resources require "bas-
ic and developmental research" by
such groups as universities and
research laboratories.e
"We are concerned with the
question of whether the orienta-
tion and size of (Michigan) re-
search is consistent with the fu-
ture needs of industry," the re-
searchers said. It is important to
fill any gaps in the present re-
search programs.
Two basic answers must be
found, they said: How Michigan
firms can choose the most benefi-
cial policies; and to what extent
these firms are able to "develop
and market new products inde-
pendently."r
Forty Alternatives
Industrial firms considering a
change in strategy have 40 pos-
sible combinations of alternatives,
which the paper lists. These in-
volve changes in three major cate-
gories: the uses and markets for a
product; the product itself, and in
the various processes of manufac-
turing and marketing
The possible alternatives in each
of these three classifications are
represented by numbers. For ex-
ample, development of a new use
for a product is alternative 1) in
the first category. To modify a
product the firm already makes
is 2) in the second.
Panel Views
State Finance
(continued from Page 1)
close this gap by 1970, Taylor
said 90,000 new jobs would be
needed each year.
Norman Barcus, research direc-
tor of the Michigan Employment
Security Commission, said the
state will need an increase in jobs
just to maintain the present em-
ployment rate. This is true be-
cause of the increasing size of the
labor force, automation and gains
in productivity.
Woodrow Ginsberg, research di-
rector for the United Auto Work-
ers, said perhaps the cardinal
problem facing the state is
"whether the assets of physical
facilities and manpower that exist
will be utilized to provide a far
healthier economy and better
standard of living."
Prof. Paul W. McCracken of the
business administration school
said he would like to see major
national tax reforms, possibly in-
cluding a "lowering of the tax
structure."
He compared many reas of

Michigan taxation with those of
other states. 'and concluded that
the differentials are not very
large even though they are in the
wrong direction."
DIA
PENSEFUL! (he said)
suspenseful. Homicide in
Jfunny results. Kiss Ruthe
orceful .characterization!"
-:H . Weiler N..imes
5-6290
man, ifts the
wildest!
SMRI[

By MARK BLUCHER
Kenneth D. Feigenbaum and
Rolland H. Wright of Wayne State
University presented a sociology
paper on "Education, Ethnic Mem-
bership and Political Conformity"
to the 66th annual meeting of the
Michigan Academy of Science, Arts
and Letters yesterday.
The report dealt with a study
relating the amount of education
and the degree of alienation from
the political system. Thirteen hun-
dred random samplings were tak-
en in an area including a wide
range of respondants, who were
asked to agree or disagree with
eight statements presented to
them in groups.
The first group included such
ideas as "a few big pressure groups
pretty well run the country," and
"most political leaders represent
the big interests." The second
group contained the statement
that "generally the man chosen
for political office is the most
capable."
Positive Response
If the first group of statements
elicited a positive response it in-

dicated, personal frustration or
powerlessness with the political
system. The second group showed
the same result if the respondant
disagreed with the statement.
A question from the first group
stated that "the people have very
little influence over representa-
tives they elect to government."
Forty-nine per cent of the Demo-
crats without any high school ed-
ucation agreed with the statement
while only 42 per cent of those
with college degrees gave a sim-
ilar response. In the Republican
party, 50 per cent of those without
education beyond the eighth grade
agreed while only 25 per cent of
those who had attended college
concurred.
In every case, the original re-
sponse was reversed as the level
of education rose. This lead to the
assumption that there is a relation
between political definition and
education. With the increase in
education, people expressed more
faith in the political system and
in their ability to cope with it.

IF it

0i'AE

CAMPUS CHAPEL
Washtenow at Forest
The Reverend Leonard Verduin, Pastor
Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan
10:00 A.M. Worship Services
11:15 A.M. Coffee Hour
7:00 P.M. Vesper Worship Service
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Toppan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller Minister.
10:45 a.m. Morning Worship.
7:30 p.m. Open House, 802 Monroe.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Woshten^w Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Hours are Monday through Sot-
and holidays. Monday evening 7:00 to 9:00
urday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. except Sundays
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. John J. Fauser, Assistant
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE
Sunday Masses at 8:00,, 9:30, 11:00, 12:00
and 12:30
Daily Masses at 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 and 1200
During Lent on Friday there will be a Mass at
5:10 p.m.
LENTEN DEVOTIONS
Wednesday, 7:30
Friday, The Stations of the Cross and Benedic-
tion at 7:15
MARRIAGE SERIES
Sunday, March 25-7:30 p.m.
"The Christian Home." Parents-ChildRela-
tionship. Education in the Home. Prayer,
Work, and Recreation in the Home. Profes-
sor and Mrs. Grant Sharpe.
Wednesday, March 28-8:00 p.m.
"Mixed Marriage." Difficulties; The Prom-
ises; Preparation and Arrangement. Rev.
John F. Bradley, Ph.D.
"CATHOLIC VOICES" SERIES
Friday, March.30-8:00 p.m.
"Christian Action in an Urban Society."
Rev. Clement Kern, Holy Trinity, Detroit.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097

TO

I

THE EVANGELICAL UNITED
BRETHREN CHURCH
Corner of Miller and Newport
John G. Swank, Pastor
Telephone NOrmandy 3-4061
Church School 10:00 A.M.
Morning Worship 11:00 A.M.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Kloudt, Pastor
9:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Morning Worship.
7:30 p.m. Evening Guild, 802 Monroe.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Woshtenow at Berkshire
Rev. Erwin Goede
The sermon topic for Sunday, March 25 will be:
"On Higher Ground."
Adult Discussion Group at 10:00
Church School at 10:30.
Church Service at 11:00.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756
10:00 A.M.,Bible School.
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study.
For Transportation coil NO 2.2756.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
Natinol Lutheran Council
Hill Street at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
Miss Anna M. Lee, Counselor
Phone: NO 8-7622
SUNDAY
9:30 and 11:00 A.M. Worship Services.
9:45 A.M. Bible Study
7:00 P.M. Speaker: Mrs. Susan Meyers, Stu-
dent Human Relations Board "Problem of
Discrimination in Ann Arbor."
WEDNESDAY
7:15 P.M. Lenten Vespers
THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
OF ANN ARBOR AND THE
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
1432 Washtenow
NO 2-3580
Services:
9:00 Virgil Janssen 1
10:30 and 11:50 Malcolm Brown
Grad group: This week Virgil Janssen will speak
on "What Happened to Easter?"
CAMPUS CENTER
10:30 A.M. Bible Study, "The Book of Acts,"
Campus Center.
6:30 P.M. Quest and Question at Campus
Center.
MONDAY
9:00 P.M. Coffee and Concern, 217 S. Ob-
servatory.
WEDNESDAY

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST STUDENT CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron-NO 3-9376
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul Light, Campus Minister
Mr. George Pickering, Intern Minister
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m. Campus Class, Baptist Campus
Center
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
6:45 p.m. A.B.S.F. "God," movie and discus-
sion.
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William' Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Rev. Edgar Edwards, Student Minister
Guild House at 524 Thompson
Services 9:30 and 11:00 a.m. Sermon Toplc:
"Isaiah Speaks to America."
Bible Lecture: 10:20-10:40, Mrs. Fred E.
Luchs.
Church School, crib-12th grade, 9:30 and
11:00 a.m.
Student Guild: 802 Monroe, telephone 2-5189.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod}
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Thomas C. Park, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Services, with ser-
mon by the Vicar, "Knowledge That Grows
In Christ."
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible study groups.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club, Supper and Program.
Sunday at 7:00: Lenten Choral Service, featur-
ing chorales from Bach's "St. Matthew Pas-
sion," with string accompaniment. Public
cordially invited.
Wednesday at 7:30 P.M.: Lenten Vespers, with
sermon by the Rev. Robert C. Seitz, Pastor
of St. Luke's Lutheran Church.
Wednesday at 8:30 P.M.: Monthly meeting of
University Lutheran Chapel Assembly.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, Campus Minister
MARCH 25, 1962
9:00 and 11:15 a.m. Morning Worship. Lent-
en Sermon Series 3. "What Jesus Taught
About Money." Sermon by Dr. Rupert. The
Service is broadcast on station WOIA.
10:15 a.m. Seminar, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m. Worship and Program: "The;.Ecu-
menical Movement and the Methodist
Church," Jean Robe, Gene Ransom.
TUESDAYS
8-11 p.m. Open House, Jean Robe's apart-
ment, 602 E. Huron.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion, Chapel, followed
by breakfast in the Pine Room. Out in time
for 8 a.m. classes.
5:15 p.m. Holy Communion in the Chapel.
THURSDAYS
7:15 p.m. Christian Marriage Class. Green
Room.
FRIDAYS
5:30 p.m. Wesley Grads, supper in the Pine
Room. Call 8-6881 for reservations by noon
Thursday.
8:00 p.m. "Cry the Beloved Country" given
by the Bishop's company in the Sanctuary
of the First Methodist Church.

Feigenbaum, Wright Give
Talk on Political Alienation

r\lJi r\
'CHU RCHr

ON

I'-

Alec Guinness. Celia Johnson,
Yvonne de Carlo
PLUS Clinton and the Law
(desegregation documentary)
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

* Ending Tonigh
Dial "WORLD IN
2-6264 n 1 nnMY POCKET
STARTING SUNDAY *
"The 4 Horsemen of the Apocalypse" ride boldly out of the
Bible into... one of the greatest love stories ever told!

t
''

Love... Intrigue
and Excitement.

This is the story
that first made Ru-
dolph Valentino a
screen star. See the
4 Horsemen is de-
scribed in St. John's
Revelation - woven'
into two and a half
hours of unforget-
table motion pic-
ture entertainment.

.

STARRING
NARCARET RUTHERFORD
ARTHUR KENNEDY
MURIEL PAYLOW
NRES ROBERTSON-.USTICE
So'ed pl"y by
"AVID PURSALand JACI(SEODOON
Poduced bySGEORGE BROWN
VO~i.oed by GEORGE POLLACK

CONTINUOUS
TODAY -
FROM 1 O'CLOCK
"FUNNY AND SUSF
Thoroughly satisfying and
triplicate with cheerful and
erford dominates with a f

M.GM osr
(RI

SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning Prayer on first Sunday
month.)

by
of

NOW !

PRANK a
SIAMMA I
flIcl~IAWFnAn

11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month.)
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer.
Rev. Jack Borckardt.
TUESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion

4:15 P.M. Noise of Solemn Assemblies. Protes-
tant Foundation, 536 Thompson.
THURSDAY
12:10 P.M. Chapel Service. Douglas Chapel.
608 E. William.
4:15 P.M: Bible Study, "The Book of Ro-
mans." 217 S. Observatory.

ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
1420 Hill St.
Herbert Nichols, Clerk
June and Tony Bing, Friends Center House

l

' ?

77

I

I

F

'I "

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan