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March 20, 1962 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1962-03-20

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THEMICHIGANDAILY

rondizi Moves

Peronists

Fr

To
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To Resume

Negotiation
On Test Ban
GENEVA (P)-Secretary of State
Dean Rusk and Soviet Foreign
Minister Andrei A. Gromyko held
an extraordinary private meeting
last night after the United States,
Britain and Russia announced wil-
lingness to resume negotiations for
a nuclear test ban treaty.
In a 30-minute session at the
Soviet villa Rusk and Gromyko-
who met at Gromyko's urging-
considered ways .-of getting the
stalled nuclear test ban talks go-
ing again.
They also discussed the explo-
sive Berlin situation, but inform-
ants did not disclose how deeply
they went into the problem.
Reveal Decision
.The decision to go back to the
bargaining table on nuclear tests
was revealed by Deputy Soviet
Foreign Minister Valerian Zorin
on the fringe of the 17-nation dis
armament conference' meeting
here.'
He tolds a news conference the
Soviet Union wanted to resume
nuclear test ban talks, and spokes-
men for the American and British
delegations promptly welcomed the
move.
The conference, meeting later.
approved the idea of a three-
member subcommittee-the Unit-
ed States, Britain and the Soviet
Union--to work on a nuclear test
ban. Rusk and Gromyko held their
meeting after that session.
Moscow Move
The day's developments appear-
ed to indicate a Moscow decision
to keep the disarmament confer-
ence alive and moving on several
fronts. But none of the differences
blocking a treaty was resolved.
President John F. Kennedy has
announced he will call off next
month's scheduled start on a new
series of United States atmospher-
ic tests if agreement can be reach-
ed on a test ban pact.
The willingness of the Ameri-
can, British and Soviet delegations
to tackle the test ban problem
once more heartened the other na-
tions represented there.
Still Differ
Despite their decision, however,
basic East-West differences on en-
forcing a test ban loom as large.
as ever before the three biggest
nuclear powers.
The main point is whether de-
tection of violations should be done
on a national basis, as the Rus-
sians insist, or by international
authority, as the West demands.
- I

VICTORY EMBRACE-Andres Framini, the Peronist supported
winner of the Buenos Aires governorship is hugged by his run-
ning mate Francisco Marcos Anglada. Anglada is expected to
become vice-governor of Buenos Aires. Framini, a labor leader,
won this post in an upset against the present Frondizi govern-
ment.
Argenttne Returns Show
AgnProtest Aaist Frondizi

Set Military
To Replace
Governors
Members of Cabinet
Offer Resignations
BUENOS AIRES (P) - At the
command of Argentina's military
chiefs, President Arturo Frondizi
last night ordered generals to su-
persede his civilian governors in
five key provinces where Peronists
triumphed in Sunday's elections.
It was the military that deposed
Dictator Juan D. Peron and drove
him into exile in 1955.
Frondizi appointed civilian offi-
cials to serve as federal represen-
tatives (interventors) under mili-
tary command in affected provin-
ces. The governors were due. to be
replaced by Peronists May 1.
Strikes Back
Peron followers struck back at
Frondizi's decree with a warning
of a nationwide strike-and fears
of an outbreak of violence
mounted.
Adding to the military's fear of
a Peronist comeback was the spec-
ter of the Communist support and
backing from followers of Fidel
Castro that helped Peronists pull
off their election upset.
Announced along with the take-
over was Frondizi's decision to ac-
cept the resignation of Interior
Minister Alfredo Vitolo. The presi-
dent named Defense Minister Jus-
to Villar to the post on an interim
basis.
Hold Meetings
Following conferences in Fron-
dizi's office two other cabinet
members-Health Minister Hector
Noblia and Public Works Minister
Jose Mazar Barnet-and with a
number of undersecretaries said
they had followed Vitolo's lead.
Frondizi reportedly tried to hold
out against the pressures of the
army, navy and air force chiefs,
but he submitted after they re-
fused to see him throughout the
day. They were reported demand-
ing that if Vitolo's resignation is
accepted it be followed by a cabi-
Ilet reshuffle to include men of
their own liking.

UN Hears
Proposalis
On Space
UNITED NATIONS (M) - The
United States placed President
John F. Kennedy's proposals for
United States-Soviet collaboration
in outer space before the United
Nations yesterday and said Soviet
acceptance would be a favorable
omen "for peace everywhere."
United States delegate Francis
T. P. Plimpton told the opening
session of the 28-nation United
Nations Committee on Peaceful
Uses of Outer Space that the pro-
posals contain no condition or lim-
itation.
"We are open to any specific
suggestions the Soviet Union may
make," he added.
No Soviet Response
There was no immediate re-
sponse from the Soviet Union. Its
delegate in the committee, Am-
bassador Platon D. Morozov, will
speak tomorrow.
Plimpton said that since crea-
tion of the committee by last
year's General Assembly "there is
hopeful prospects of collaboration
between my country and the Soviet
Union in outer space projects."
Kennedy proposed joint estab-
lishment of an early operational
weather satellite system to provide
global data for use by any nation;
joint tracking service; magnetic
field mapping; cooperative effort
in space communications; ex-
change of information in the field
of space medicine; discussion of
steps for joint exploration of the
Moon, Mars and Venus.
Breakthrough
"We now await Chairman
Khrushchev's response to these
proposals," Plimpton added. "If
we are, indeed, on the verge of a
breakthrough toward real space
cooperation between our two coun-
tries-as we emphatically hope is
the case-it would be a most fav-
orable omen for our work here,
and indeed, for peace everywhere."
He said the committee might
consider also ways of encouraging
formation of national space com-
mittees which would help member
nations to participate more ef-
fectively in international space
programs.
The committee re-elected Am-
bassador Franz Matsch of Austria
as its chairman. This is the first
extended session on outer space
cooperation attended by the Soviet
Union. Previously the Soviet Bloc
boycotted the meetings in protest
over the makeup or procedure of
the committee.

By BEN F. MEYER
Associated Press News Analyst
WASHINGTON-At first glance,
the elections in Argentina appear
more of a protest by working peo-
ple at policies of President Arturo
Frondizi than any approval of for-
mer dictator Juan Peron.
It will require more complete
returns to explain just what hap-
pened to put' Argentina at the
brink of a serious political and
constitutional crisis.
Of one thing there seems no
doubt: Frondizi took a thumping
defeat, and the Peronist forces
won a victory. The Communist-
backed Peronists won 10 of 18
provincial governorships and about
40 seats in the 192-seat House of
Deputies-far from enough to con-
trol but perhaps enough to play a
critical balance-of-power role.
Power Grows
In Argentina the chief political
power had been held by two groups
knowns as radicals, which by
United States standards are more
in th'e nature of liberals than rad-
icals.
Frondizi's intransigent radicals
normally got their sternest oppo-
sition from the People's Radical
Party. There are some indications
that these two groups helped to
blast each other's machine in Sun-
day's voting, and that could have
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By G. K. HODENF IELD
Associated Press Education Writer
WASHINGTON-Teachers and
students lie to each other, and spy
on each other.
The classroom atmosphere reeks
of fear, suspicion, mistrust.
That is the essence of educa-
tion in the Soviet zone of Ger-
many today, as reported by a spe-
cial commission of inquiry for the
World Confederation of Organiza-

...._.

EAST GERMAN EDUCATION:
Distrust Reigns in Classrooms

RUSSIA
AND
EASTERN EUROPE

made it easy for the Peronists toc
pick up the pieces.t
Yet there are some aspects of1
the voting which cannot be ig-
nored:
1) The results apparently werec
as much of a surprise to Frondiziz
and his political planners as they
were to people in the United States
and elsewhere.,
Serious Testt
2) The results provide a serious
test of Argentina's constitutional
processes. The Frondizi govern-
ment apparently sought to allow
Argentines to express their choicec
in a democratic manner, confident
the government would win. Be-
cause of this, Frondizi apparentlyr
is reluctant to use his powers tot
upset the results.
3) If the election rallies politi-
cal groups now opposing each oth-
er into a unified organization to
fight for Argentina's progress with
less bickering than in the past, it
could strengthen rather than
weaken Argentina's political and
constitutional structure.
4) The efforts of the Frondizic
government to tackle its economic,
social and political problems -t
largely a heritage of the Peron dic-(
tatorship-have attracted praise
in this country and elsewhere. Thec
election results may suggest that
the measures to restore generall
health to Argentina's national
structure had not yet reached the
point where results were going tot
work in a way they could see them.
Austerity Measures
5) Austerity measures such as
Frondizi has undertaken are nevert
popular in any country.
One thing seems certain. A new
political figure has arisen in Ar-
gentina in the person of Andres
Framini, textile union leader, who
wa selected by a large majority as
governor of populous Buenos
Aires Province.
He is regarded in some quarters
as a man who might, if he handles3
himself properly, project himself
into the presidential campaign of
1964.
There have been some signs that
Framini would not be keen aboutE
trying to resuscitate Peron. He is
also regarded as no great admirer
of Fidel Castro's nor of the Com-
munist system.
Gust To Enter
Primary Race
LANSING-Detroit attorney and
constitutional convention delegate
Rockwell T. Gust (R-Detroit) yes-
terday announced his candidacy
for the Republican nomination for
lieutenant governor.
Gust, who received his law de-
gree from the University, spoke
to the University Young Republi-
cans' Club February 27.
In announcing his intention to
enter the 1962 primary Gust em-
phasized the leaders of the state
government must serve the best
interest of all citizens of Michigan
and use the resources of the state
as a means of meeting its many
problems.

U.S. Limits
Governingf
Of Ishands
WASHINGTON (UP) - President
John F. Kennedy restricted Unit-
ed States military rule over Okin-
awa yesterday but declared this
nation must continue to govern
the Japanese-owned Ryukyu Is-
lands to deter Communist threats.
In a statement and new execu-
tive order designed to ease pres-
sure for immediate restoration to
Japan of the strategic Ryukyu Is-
land chain of which Okinawa is a
part, the President said:
"I recognize the Ryukyus to be
a part of the Japanese homeland
and look forward to the day when
the security interest of the free
world will permit their restoration
to full Japanese sovereignty."
Bases Important
Stressing the military import-
ance of United States bases on
Okinawa and other Ryukyu Is-
lands, he said "They help us as-
sure our allies in the great arc
from Japan through southeast
Asia not only of our willingness
but also of our ability to come to
their assistance in case of need."
To give the 800,000 Ryukyu Is-
landers a greater voice in the man-
agement of their own affairs the
President:
1) Provided for a United States
civilian instead of a military man
to be civil administrator under Lt.
Gen. Paul Caraway, the United
States high commissioner and
commander of United States forces
in the Ryukyus.
2) Restricted the veto powers of
the high commissioner overgacts
of the Ryukyu legislature to cases
affecting the security and national
interest of the United;States.
Lift Aid Ceiling
3) Asked Congress to lift the
current $6-million annual ceiling
on economic aid to the Ryukyus.'
4) Set up machinery for Japan
to share in long-range economic
development projects.
5) Eased travelrestrictions by
permitting Ryukyuans to obtain
Japanese passports.
6) Lengthened the term of Ryut
kyu legislators from two to three
years and provided for nomina-
tion by the legislature of the chief
executive of the government of the
Ryukyu Islands who must be a
Ryukyuan.
The President's order establish-
ing a civilian -administrator be-
comes effective July 1. All other
changes in his executive order take
effect April 1.
5)Esdtpe rsrcin y

GUATEMALA (A) - President
Miguel Ydigoras predicted yester-
day the revolt against his embat-
tled regime will soon end.
But his foes pledged defiance
until he falls, and then sought ar-
my backing for a non-Communist
front to replace; his government.
Official radio broadcasts insist-
ed the army was standing solidly
behind the government ready to
smash any further demonstrations.
The Association of University
Students, which started the revolt
last Tuesday, was- told by its lead-
THE WHOLE COUNTRY
IS BECOMING
STAGE
STRUC
From Romeo and Juliet to Guys and
Dolls-about 56f,000 plays a year
are being put on by amateur actors.
In this week's Post, you'll learn
how housewives and businessmen
get brow-beaten by brash young di-
rectors. How the acting bug
wrecked one girl's engagement.-And
how top Broadway names are help-
ing out their amateur colleagues.'
The Saturday Evening
MARCH 24 £8$U NOW ON SAWt

ership that the anti-Ydigoras
movement will continue until the
regime falls.
At least 20 persons have been
killed and more than 530 wound-
ed in clashes between security
forces and students protesting al-
leged frauds in last December's
elections which returned Ydigor-
as's conservative party to power.
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tions of the Teaching Profession
(WCOTP).
The report, released here re-
cently, included this testimony
from one of the 75,000 teachers
who have fled the Communist re-
gime since 1945:
"What I disliked most was the
constant pressure and fear of spies.
Every word must be weighed.
'Mostly Opposed'
"Your pupils mostly are op-
posed to the (Communist) regime;
they know their teachers mostly
are opposed; and teachers and pu-
pils are telling lies to each other
all the time."
Heinz Buchholtz, who fled the
Russian sector of Berlin in 1953,
said at a news conference:
"In the Soviet zone, the right
of the parents to guide their chil-
dren's education has been abso-
lutely abolished. Private schools
also are forbidden. Entrance to a
university is not determined by
grades or entrance examinations,
but by a year or more of 'socialist
production,' which means factory
work."
Members of the commission of
inquiry wrote its report after a
six-day stay in Berlin last Decem-
ber. Commission members included
William G. Carr, executive secre-
tary of the National Educational

Ydigoras Predicts Decline
Of Guatemalan Rebellion

World News Roundup

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Education Association and secre-
tary general of WCOTP.
Before the. Berlin wall was built,
100 teachers lived in East Berlin
but taught in West Berlin schools,
the report said. Forty of these 100
were in the Western zone when
the wall went up, and did not re-
turn; three managed to escape
later, and 57 are still in East Ber-
lin.
None of these 57 is allowed to
teach because they are considered
unreliable, the report said.
Denounce Teachers?
Do students often denounce
their teachers?
"Yes, because in nearly every
class there will be one or two chil-
dren whose parents are party lead-
ers," the report said.
Why, after years of indoctrina-
tion, is there still so much resist-
ance (to Communism)?
One teacher said: "First, there
is the example of West Berlin's
prosperity and freedom. Second,
the indoctrination is often so blat-
ant that it defeats itself. Third,
the influence of family ties and
friendships in West Berlin."
The report estimated that about
90 per cent of the school adminis-
trators in East Berlin are Commu-
nists, but only 10 per cent of the
teachers.

By The Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS - Israel
charged yesterday that Syria gave
"a completely untrue account" to
the president of the Security
Council last Saturday of an Is-
raeli-Syrian clash in the vicinity
of Galilee.
Syria informed the council
president, Ambassador Carlos So-
sarodriguez of Venezuela, that Is-
rael committed acts of aggression
threatening peace in the area in
clashes that occurred March 16-
17.
HAVANA - The rationing of
food began in Cuba yesterday, a
week after Prime Minister Fidel
Castro went on television to an-
nounce the unpleasant measure to
his people.
WASHINGTON - A top space
agency official gave a broad hint
yesterday that the new Centaur
rocket stage will get its first test
flight within a matter of days.
LEOPOLDVILLE - President
Moise Tshombe yesterday demand-
ed that the central government
recognize his internal authority
over all Katanga province as the
first step in ending his secession.
A source close to Tshombe told
newsmen the Katangan president
had presented the demand at his
meeting with Premier Cyrille Ado-
ula.
WASHINGTON-A $300-million a
year increase in military housing
allowances was proposed yesterday
JOHN LEE HOOKER JOH
OHN LEE HOOKER JOHN
HN LEE HOOKER JOHN
N LEE HOOKER JOHN L
LEE HOOKER JOHN LE
LEE HOOKER JOHN LEE
EE HOOKER JOHN LEE
E HOOKER JOHN LEE H
HOOKER JOHN LEE HO
HOOKER JOHN LEE HOO
OOKER JOHN LEE HOOK
OKER JOHN LEE HOOKE
KER JOHN LEE HOOKER

WASHINGTON - The Senate
Foreign Relations Committee yes-
terday finished questioning Peace
Corps Director. Sargent Shriver
amid indications it will approve
his request for funds to double
the organization's size.
* * *
NEW YORK-The stock market
staged an irregular decline yester-
day in moderately active trading.
Gains and losses arong pivotal is-
sues ran from fractions to around
a point. Dow-Jones average of 30
industrials was off by 2.39.
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Ken Miller

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