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March 10, 1962 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-03-10

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,1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1.62 THE THC___ : _ A!.V

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PennsyNYC Request
n
Commission Approval
'Of PrTo, RO rer
Of Prposal for Merge
Smith Hopes Repor Create
May Aid Railroads arges Lie
By ROBERT SELWA -The pay structure should be
sive" exploration of railroad la- to both time and miles. The vast ExM
bor-management relations in the differences in pay compensation Xpect ost Unions
history of the United States hope- should be compressed. To Oppose Move
fully will bring about the resolu- -Moving expenses and compen-
tion of some of the "exceedingly sation for wage loss and' loss of WASHINGTON (W--The Penn-
difficult and complex" problems home values should be provided sylvania and New York Central
facing them. for employes required to relocate Railroads formally asked permis-
This is the opinion of Associate No New Firemen ioasfray a d perm
Dean of the Law School Russell -No new firemen need be hired sion yesterday to merge and form
A. Smith, vice-chairman of the in road freight or yard service, the nation's largest rail system--a
15-member tripartite Presidential but firemen's jobs in passenger proposal certain to stir a prolonged
Railroad Commission that has just service should continue; and bitter struggle.
released a 567-page report on -Firemen with less than ten The two railroads filed with the
American railroads. years' seniority should be separ- Interstate Commerce Commission
Negotiations between the major ated or furloughed. Those with I
railroads and the five train-oper- 10 years or more seniority should their petition for approval of the
sting unions begin later this be kept with full job rights. Fire- merger plans first announced by
:nonth and Smith believes the re- , men separated or furloughed the companies' executives last Jan.
port will have an impact on the would receive compensation, pref- 12. Stockholders of the two cor-
negotiations. "But we can't tell erential hiring status, and two
how successful the recommenda- years of training in a new job at porations will be asked to approve
tions will be because of labor's re- railroad expense. the merger in separate meetings
sistance to the report," he adds. --Changes in crew size should May 8.
Overhaul practices be made following a comprehen- If approved, the merger would'
The commission's report-cm- sive survey and a reasonable per- produce a system with 20,073 miles
The o mmissions reportcn- iod of negotiations. of track, nearly 10 per cent of
pleted after 15 months of study- -Railroads should have an un- the national total, and with more;
recommends an overhauling of limited right to introduce tech- than $5.3 billion in assets. The
railroad labor kpractices,nwage nological change. Employes de- companies now have about 121,000
structures and working conditions prived of employment because of employes, most of themrepresent-!
overing 21,000 operating em- such changes should be compen- ed by unions which are expected
ployes, principally engineers, fire- sated and retrained, receiving to oppose the merger strenuously.
nen, conductors and switch tend- preferential status in a national The largest currently operating
Drs. railroad hiring pool'. system is the Santa Fe with 12,995
Handed to President John F. Lodging Allowance miles of track.
Kennedy Feb. 28, the report re- Lodging or lodging allowance There was no indication when
sects the unanimous views of the shouldrbe provided for employes the ICC will begin hearings. Usual-
lie public members, including away from home. ly it is several months after the
accept pit. The five labor members Smith, the Law School's direc- filing of the petition. A final de-;
ccept It. Tdhe filaborssenbens tor of legal research and co-direc- cision is unlikely short of a year
do not, and have filed dissenting tor of the Institute of Labor and or more.
Dpinions.]
The commission estimates that Industrial Relations of the Univer- In addition to the assured oppo-]
ts recommendations will eliminate sity and Wayne State University, sition of the unions, the merger
says that no legal problems were probably will be brought before
10,00 t en5,00 Jy involved in the preparation of the the ICC by some shippers fearing]
Independent Study report.rergesninevceadp-
Smith praises the commission "But we had the problem of retrogression in service and per-
eport for providing, for the first getting an awful lot done within haps by some railroads, fearing
ine, independent and important a deadline," he adds. "If we had orously suppetor t be meian
tudies of the manpower and pay six months to a year more time, eAssociation road by the American
tructures of the railroads. "The we might have come up with Association of Railroads and other
acts it provides should prove use- something alittle mrepalat abi durey k .

Nasser Sets Constitution
For Gaza Strip Region
CAIRO (M)-President Gamal Abdel Nasser yesterday proclaimed
a constitution for the Gaza Strip, a coastal segment of Palestine that
has been under Egyptian administration since the Arab-Israeli war
of 1948.
He said, however, a Palestine state is the goal.
A presidential decree declared Gaza is "an integral part of Pal-
estine lands and its people (many of them among the million Arab
refugees of the war) are part of '

-

the Arab nation."
The new constitution, Nasser
said, is applicable in Gaza until
such time as a permanent consti-
tution is issued for a Palestine
state.
The decree said the Palestinians
in Gaza will form a national un-
ion with "the aim of restoring
the usurped lands in Palestine."
The decree guaranteed for Pal-
estinians equality of rights and
duties with no discrimination of
race, language or religion; and.
individual freedom of expression
and private ownership.
The decree also organized exec-
utive, legislative and judiciary
branches of the Gaza government.
An appointed governor general
will head the executive council of

Pilots Train
Vietnamese
WASHINGTON (M) - Officials
said yesterday American pilots are
engaged in combat missions with
Vietnamese pilots in training them
to fight Red guerrillas.
Reports from Saigon have said
the United States-supplied planes,
flown by American and Vietna-
mese pilots, haveengaged in
bombing and strafing attacks
against the Communists.
No immediate clarification was
available from the State Depart-
ment on whether this fits in with
the U.S. policy as enunciated by
President John F. Kennedy-that
Americans in Viet Nam are as-
signed for training not combat,
but are under orders to fire back
if shot at.
Some 4,000 U.S. military have
been sent to Viet Nam in the mas-
sive United States aid and train-
ing program against the Commu-
nist guerrillas.
Officials emphasized that Amer-
ican pilots do not fly alone on
combat missions, but are always

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-The Pentagon
acted yesterday to set up a pool
of reservists tagged for quick
emergency callup and eased re-
quirements for students and teach-
ers in the ready reserve.
The new pool is designed to
ease the future hardships and
difficulties such as those that be-
set reservists called during the
Berlin crisis.
Men in the pool would be used
to fill understrength reserve or
National Guard units summoned
to active duty in any new cold
war emergencies.
- Grant Delay
Students or teachers now not
serving in organized units of the
ready reserve may be granted a
delay in any future callup until
the completion of the school quar-
ter or semester in which they are
studying or teaching.
Just how many men would be
placed in the pool is impossible
to say now, a Defense Depart-
ment spokesman said, since each
service is working out its own pro-
gram.
The project is an outgrowth of
complaints registered when 155,000
reservists and National Guards-
men were summoned to duty last
fall. Some of them said they were
called up unfairly because of fam-
ily responsibilities, critical jobs
and other reasons they consid-
ered entitled them to deferment.
Reservist Complaints
Most of the complaints came
from among the 28,000 Army ready,
reservists who were summoned to
fill the below-strength units. The
Army said part of this resulted
because the reservists did not keep
the service informed of changes
in their family and job status.
The pool will be set up along
guidelines laid down by Secretary
of Defense Robert S. McNamara

explained to a congressional com-
mittee Jan. 19.
Preferably, he said, the pool
would consist of men who had,
only six months of full-time train-
ing before entering the reserve.
'These persons," he said, "would
be carefully screened to eliminate
all those not available for imme-
diate recall for reasons of occu-
pation, family status, etc."
Screen Carefully
Yesterday's Defense Department
announcement said the Army,
Navy and Air Force and Marines

will carefully screen those sele
ed for the pool to insure that ti
are available. Then, it said, t]
will be notified that they hi
been tagged for priority call
active duty.
A Defense Department spok
man in discussing the emerger
pool of reservists said one se
ice, which he did not identify, 1
considered avoiding the callup
men who were mustered in
Berlin crisis, if another em
gency should develop after tl
return to civilian life.

World News Roundup

EASE HARDSHIPS:
Pentagon To Organize Reservist Pool

By The Associated Press
MIAMI -- President John F.
Kennedy last night formally de-
clared a major disaster area in
storm-battered New Jersey, Mary-
land, Delaware, Virginia and West
Virginia.
White House Press Secretary
Pierre Salinger said aid funds will
be allocated after the office of
emergency planning surveys dam-
age in the states.
* * *
LANSING-Gov. John B. Swain-
son, seeing a number of his pet
bills die in committee, yesterday
branded the legislative committee
system a "fraud on the people."
Republicans, who control all
major committees, are "afraid to
bring controversial bills out on the
floor for debate," he said.

mitted either next Tuesday c
Wednesday and another on pr(
tection of interests of consume
on Thursday.
* * *
ROME-An organization claim
ing ties with the French Secr
Army Organization (OAS) warne
Italian political leaders yesterda
it would touch off nationwide re
olution, should Italy's new left
wing government be approved.
* * *
ALGIERS - Algeria's macab
war within a war claimed the liv
of 16 Moslems, Including 4 worn
en, under fire of French securi
forces in Oran yesterday. Thr
died in a skirmish with polic
and 13 in a barricaded warehous
* *\'.

accompanied by a Vietnamese
pilot.
The purpose of such flights by
the Americans is to train the Viet-
namese so that they can carry out
future combat missions on their
own, officials said.

NEW YORK=The stock marl
* * * continued its advance yesteri
WASHINGTON - The White posting a gain for the second d
House reported yesterday that in succession. Trading was mod
President John F. Kennedy in- ately active. The Dow Jones
tends to send two messages to industrials closed at 714.44,
Congress next week. railroads at 145.71, 15 utilities
One on foreign aid will be sub- 129.90, and 65 stocks at 243.59

GAMAL ABDUL NASSER
... Gaza Strip

r #

10 directors responsible for econo-
my, finance, education, health and
security.
The governor general will also
head the legislative council com-
prising the executive council, 22
elected members of, national union
committees and 10 members ap-
pointed by the governor general.
The armed forces stationed in
the Gaza strip, the constitution
said, will be subject to a command
to be determined by the supreme
command of the UAR armed
forces.

rc OME

ro

rrl J it Cr!

ON

7 hl

A:r -!rt A7 H

ful tools in testing out future pro-
posals on the railroads," he says.
The main broad conclusions of
Smith and the other public mem-
bers In the report are:
-The present system of rules is
outmoded in many fundamentals;
-Work relations between em-
ployes 'and railroads are governed
by a system of rules, regulations
and practices that largely came
into being before modern tech-
nology, and hence are also out-
mode ;
Work Rules
-The system of work rules fails
to achieve a full and reasonable
apportionment of work and com-
pensation.
Smith, who ,served the State
Bar five years in a formal capacity
advising on labor relations, and
the other public members of the
Railroad Commission recommend:
mend:,
-A gradual annual reduction
in retirement age should be pro-
vided so that by 1967 all employes
would be required to retire at age
65;'
-The permissible maximum
hours on duty should be reduced
from 16 to 14 and eventually to
12,together with weekly and
monthly limits;
Cubans Form
Collective Unit
HAVANA W)-Cuba's Marxist-
Leninist rulers appeared to have
embraced collective leadership
yesterday by announcing a 25-
member directorate without a
chairman, president or vice-presi-
dent.
The directorate composes the
leadership of the Integrated Rev-
olutionary Organization (ORD),
the pilot organization for Cuba's
single proletarian - style party
which is to be formed.
Heading the list are Prime Min-
ister Fidel Castro, followed in or- .
der by his brother Raul, the armed
forces chief, Argentine-born in-
dustries minister Ernesto (Che)
Guevara and President Osvaldo
Dorticos.
IANCHOR INN

to labor. But even this is doubt-
ful."

it

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappon Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
10:45 a.m. Morning Worship.
7:30 p.m. Open House,'802 Monroe.
THE EVANGELICAL UNITED
BRETHREN CHURCH
Corner of Miller and Newport
John G. Swank, Pastor
Telephone NOrmandy 3-4061
Church School 10:00 A.M.
Morning Worship 11:00 A.M.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Washtenow at Forest
The Reverend Leonard Verduin, Pastor
Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan
10:00 A.M. Worship Services
11:15 A.M. Coffee Hour
7:00 P.M. Vesper Worship Service
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756
10:00 A.M. Bible School.
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study..
For Transportation call NO 2-2756.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. John J. Fauser, Assistant
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 a.m., 12:00
Noon and 12:30.
Holyday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 9:00 a.m., 12:00
Noon, 5:10 p.m.
Weekday Masses: 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 a.m. and
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions: Mother of Perpetual Help,
Wednesday evening, 7:30 p.m.
Rosary and Litany: Doily at 5:10 p.m.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT.
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.- Holy Communion foflowed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning Prayer on first Sunday of
month.)
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month.)
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer.
Rev. Jack Borckardt.

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Kloudt, Postor
9:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Morning Worship.
7:30 p.m. Evening Guild, 802 Monroe.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washfenow Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Hours ore Monday through Sat-
and holidays. MondaIy evening 7:00 to 9:00
urday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. except Sundays
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Rev. Edgar Edwards, Student Minister,
Guild House at 524 Thompson
Services 9:30 and 11:00 a.m. Sermon Topic:
"My Name is Moses"
Bible Lecture: 10:20-10:40, Mrs. Fred E.
Luchs.
Church School, crib-12th grade, 9:30 and
11:00 a.m.I
Student Guild: 802 Monroe, telephone 2-5189.

NORTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
2250 Fuller Rood (Opposite V.A. Hospital)
NOrmondy 3.2969
William S. Baker, Minister
Morning Worship 10:45 a.m.
Church School and Child Core.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenow at Berkshire
Rev. Erwin Goede
The sermon topic for Sunday, March 11 will be
"The Crisis of Liberalism"
Adult Discussion Group at 10:00
Church School at 10:30.
Church Service at 11:00.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST STUDENT CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron-NO 3-9376
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul Light, Campus Minister
Mr. George Pickering, Intern Minister
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m. Campus Discussion Class.
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue -
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Thomas C. Park, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11;15: Services, Sermon by
the Pastor, "Church-Going That Is Worth-
while"
Sunday at 9:45 and 1s1:15:Bible Study, "The
Church and the Churches"
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta Lutheran Stu-
dent Club, Supper Program. Talk at 6:45
on "The Role of the Church in the Chang-
ing City" by Mr. Larry Kersten, Planning
Analyst for the Detroit Council of Churches.
Wednesday at 7:30: Lenten Vespers, with ser-
mon by the pastor, "Art Not Thou Also One
of This Man's Disciples?"

;i1

I'

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill Street at S. Forest Ave.
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
Miss Anna M. Lee, Counselor
Phone: NO 8-7622,
SUNDAY
9:30 & 11 A.M. Worship Services
9:45 A.M Bible Study
7:00 P.M. "The Church and Higher Educa-
tion" Prof. Allan Pfnister, Speaker.
WEDNESDAY
7:15 P.M. Lenten Service
THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
OF ANN ARBOR AND THE
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
1432 Washtenaw
NO 2-3580
Sunday Services: 9:00 and 10:30 Rev. Elmer
Homrighousen, Dean of Princeton Theologi-
cal Seminary.
11:50 Rev. Jack Borckardt.
CAMPUS CENTER
10:30 A.M. Bible Study, "The Book of Acts,"
Campus Center.
6:30 PM. Quest and Question at Campus
Center.
MONDAY
9:00 P.M. Coffee and Concern, 217 S. Ob-
servatory.
WEDNESDAY
4:15 P.M. Noise of Solemn Assemblies. Protes-

i

11;

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ronsom, Campus Minister
MARCH 11, 1962
9:00 and 11:15 A.M. Morning Worship. Len-
ten Sermon Series: "What Jesus taught
about God." Sermon by Dr. Rupert. The
Service is broadcast on station WOIA at
11:15 A.M.
10:15 A.M.: SEMINAR IN WORLD UNDER-
STANDING: EGYPT. Speaker, Mr. Saloh
Mogawer. Pine Room.
7:00 P.M. WORSHIP AND PROGRAM: Stu-
dent Panel on Summer Service Projects.
WEDNESDAYS
7:00 A.M. HOLY COMMUNION, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast in the Pine Room. Out
in time for 8 A.M. classes.
FRI DAYS
5:30 P.M. Wesley Grads Supper, Pine Room.
For reservations call 8-6881.

DANCING
SATURDAY NIGHT
featuring
DI'Mk3 D', I M A dwTET

[ I

I rt

TUESDAY-

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