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February 24, 1962 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1962-02-24

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Ir

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

_,_..r __ . _,.. _.. ,._ _
o e .

President, Nation Honor

Glenn

ilot Calls Re-Entry
Difficult, Spectacular
Controls Friendship 7' Manually
After Attitude System Malfunctions
By The Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL-Astronaut John H. Glenn, Jr. yesterday de-
scribed his three-orbit flight to newsmen after President Jolin F.
Kennedy awarded him a medal for his "unflinching courage" and
"outstanding contribution to the advancement of human knowledge."
A cheering crowd of perhaps 100,000 persons had earlier paid
respects to Glenn as he rode in an open convertible along an 18-mile
parade route.
The first American to orbit the earth admitted that he had a
few uneasy moments during a "spectacular" re-entry from space
''when he feared his capsule heat

Army Adds
To Strength
Of STRAC
WASHINGTON (P)-The Army
is almost tripling the size of its
"ready-alert" force, the Strategic
Army Corps (STRAC) by expand-
ing the organization from the
present three divisions to eight.
The object of the reorganiza-
tion, an announcement yesterday
said, is to provide a force big
enough and flexible enough to
cope with possible simultaneous
troubles in widely separated areas
of the world.
To do this, the Army has orga-
nized a second STRAC unit, one
of them--the present unit-which
is essentially an airborne corps,
and the other an armored unit.
The new corps, the Pentagon
said, will be composed initially of
the 49th armored, 32 infantry, 4th
infantry and "second armored di-
visions.
The existing STRAC corps, un-
der a realignment, will be com-
posed of the 82nd and 101st air-
borne divisions, and the 1st and
2nd infantry divisions.
When two new regular Army
divisions have completed train-
ing and equipping, they will take
over present National -Guard po-
sitions, probably this summer.
The creation of the new STRAC
corps will expand the size of the
quick reacting portion of the Ar-
my, but it will not change the
overall manpower strength of the
ground forces.
About 75,000 men will be moved
over into STRAC under the pro-
gram.
STRAC keeps its units armed,
equipped and ready to begin mov-
ing out within a few hours after
emergency orders are issued. For
transportation, it depends on
planes of the Air Force and the
Military Air Transport System.

Soviets May UseRoc

i

With Manned First StaE

13

Expect Delay
At Con-Con
By MARK BLUCHER
It's unlikely that Michigan's
constitutional convention w i l l
meet its deadline. .
The delegates had hoped to fin-
ish framing the new state con-
stitution by March 31, in order to
place it on the November ballot.
It now. appears that longer-
than-expected floor debate will
force the work to continue until
sometime in May before the new
document is ready.
Through Eight Stages
All proposals at con-con must
go through eight stages before
final approval: first reading before
the convention, referral to and
modification by one of the ten
standing committees, second read-
ing before the convention, discus-
sion by the convention meeting in
Committee of the Whole, third
reading, vote by Committee of the
Whole, referral to the Committee
on Style and Drafting, and de-
bate and final vote by the conven-
tion.,
So far, only two standing com-
mittee reports have gone through
Committee of the Whole and to
the style and drafting stage. Two
of the Education Committee's
three proposals have been voted
upon by the Committee of the
Whole. All other measures are in
earlier stages of consideration.
Bans Graduated Tax
Among the measures the Com-
mittee of the Whole has approved
is one banning a graduated state
income tax. Other tentatively ap-
proved provisions would allow lo-
cal communities to levy payroll
taxes on both resident and non-
residents, would pave the way for
modified home rule by counties,1
and would abolish the present 15-e
mill limit on taxation by local
counties, townships and schoolt
districts.
Next on the con-con agenda,I
the proposals from the committees
on the Executive Branch, on Leg-
islative Organization (apportion-
ment), and on the judiciary will
come before the Committee of the
Whole.
World News
.R d
Roundup
By The Associated Press
BANGKOK-Prime Minister Sa-
rit Thanarat yesterday charged
runits of Communist Chinese 96th
Army have entered Laos to
strengthen the pro-Communist
Pathet Lao rebels battlingnroyal
Laotian government forces for the
provincial capital of Nam Tha.
* * *
CARACAS - President Romulo
Betancourt said yesterday leftist
students tried to seize the Mai-
quetia International Airport near
Caracas last month as a base for
arms-carrying planes from Cuba.
The students failed.
* * *
WASHINGTON -- The general
activity of 100 Navy men who
have been in an underground fall-
out, shelter since last Saturday
#appears to be slowing down," the
Navy said yesterday.
** *
NEW YORK-Despite a rally by
savings-and-loans, the stock mar-
ket declined yesterday. The Dow-
Jones industrial average dropped
1.2 points to 370.6.

shield might be burning up.
Warning Light Fails
An electronic warning light, not
the heat shield, was later found
to be faulty.
He reported he was very pleased
at his 4bility to function in
weightlessness, especially his abil-
ity to control his Friendship 7
space vehicle after a slight mal-
function in the automatic attitude
control system forced him to as-
sume manual control for much of
the journey.
Glenn added that when it came
to eating in space he recommended
something solid, not cookies whose
crumbs would go floating about
and "you couldn't get them back
without a butterfly net."
Sees New Star Field
On his first orbit, he noticed
something that looked "like a
completely new star field," and
found that it was made up of par-
ticles six to 10 feet apart, white
and about the size of a pinhead.
"I don't know what you can say
about a day when you see four
beautiful sunsets," Glenn said, and
he couldn't ask for more than that
his space flight might lead to
American cooperation with Russia
in the exploration of space.
Flaming Metal
I mperils Sip
. CAPE CANAVERAL {)-Astro-
naut John H. Glenn, Jr. told Pres-
ident John F. Kennedy yesterday
how "big, flaming chunks" of met-
al from his spaceship's braking
rocket package burned off and
"came up past the window" at the
most harrowing moment of his or-
bital space flight.
As Glenn explained, there were
some indications that the heat
shield of his Mercury capsule was
breaking up. If that had happen-
ed, he and the craft would have
burned up during re-entry into
the atmosphere.
Glenn has been listed to testify
next Tuesday before the House
Science and Astronautics Commit-
tee.

WASHINGTON (M)-Some gov-
ernment analysts believe the So-
viet Union has developed a sys-
tem of launching intercontinental'
missiles, spaceships and satellites
from manned rocketplanes.
Such a system would have great
military significance.
The experts' conclusions were
made public yesterday after hav-
ing been kept secret for nine
months. Their accuracy is not
fully accepted by the government.
According to a 160-page report
prepared by intelligence analysts,
there is good reason to believe
that two manned rocketplanes at-
tached to opposite sides of a pow-
erful rocket engine have been used
as the first stage in a number of
Soviet space shots.
Flown Back to Earth
If the theory is correct, the
Inonu Lauded
By Parliament
.ANKARA (P)-Premier Ismet In-
onu received a standing ovation
from Parliament yesterday fol-
lowing collapse of an armed forces
uprising against his government.
It seemed appropriate acclaim
for the one-time general who stub-
bornly refused to give in to de-
mands from mutinous army units
that he step down and clear the
way for a new military govern-
ment in Turkey.'
The Turkish high command,
meanwhile, moved swiftly to heal
breaches created between the
armed forces in the short-lived
uprising. About 70 reformist offi-
cers who led the mutiny were
quietly transferred to new assign-
ments early yesterday.

planes were freed from the large
rocket near the fringes of spa
and were flown back to earth
their pilots. The second sta
rocket then continued into spa
boosting a third stage which eve
tually completed the flight on
own.
The reported development cou
have great significance in miss
warfare, since the first-stageroc]
etplanes could be recovered a
used again in future firings.
According to the report, t
third stage used in various Russi
tests involving rocketplanes cc
sisted of dummy intercontinent
missiles and space vehicles. It sa
the rocketplane launching syste
apparently was used in a series
Soviet missile tests over the R
cific early in 1960.
Third Stage Recovery
Another significant conclusi
reached in the report concerns t
recovery of third-stage space v,
hicles.
It indicated some Soviet spae
ships are brought safely back
earth through a re-entry syste
combining the use of metallic a
fabric parachutes, retro-rocke
and telescopic wings which can
thrust into the air to act as a dr
or to guide the ship into a seri
of "skip-glides" into the atmo
phere.
In the skip-glide process, t
vehicle coasts down into the a
mosphere, which slows its fligr
then skips back into space befC
gliding down again. The repo
said glides of this sort can be co
tinued for several days.
"There are indications that t
Soviets have developed a mul
purpose, re-usable, winged carrie
rocket as a vertical launch v
hicle for spacecraft," the repc
states.

--AP Wirephoto
ASTRONAUT HONORED-President John F. Kennedy pins the space agency's Distinguished Service
Medal on astronaut John Glenn at a ceremony inCape Canaveral yesterday. In the center is Maj.
Gen. Leighton Davis, commander of the Air Force Missile Test Center.

Castro Gone;
No Comment
From Havana
By The Associated Press
HAVANA-Cuban Prime Minis-
ter Fidel Castro has not been seen
in public for 11 days.
Castro, who was supposed to
attend a recent public ceremony,
reportedly did not show up, and
officials who might know his
whereabouts are refusing to an-
swer questions.
A rumor, whose origin cannot
be traced, is that Castro might be
in Moscow. However, neither Mos-
cow nor Havana have in any way
denied or confirmed this.
There is also speculation that
the Cuban government may now
be in the hands of a collective
Communist leadership which is
restricting Castro's actions. Ob-
servers noted that Castro read,
rather than ad-libbed as he usual-
ly does, his Feb. 5 "Declaration
of Havana." Observers conclude
that the speech might have been
written by someone else.
Ask State Display
At World's Fair
Rep. Gilbert Bursley (R-Ann
Arbor) and Sen. John Stahlin (R-
Belding) have introduced legisla-
tion in both the House and the
Senate that would provide for'
Michigan's participation in the
1964-65 World's Fair at New York.
The bills recommend that $150-
000 be appropriated from the gen-
eral fund for preliminary planning
for the Michigan exhibit.

KENNEDY TOUR:
Feingold Says Journey
Illustrates, U.S. Concern
By ROBERT SELWA
Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy is a "dramatic exponent" of
American concern for other countries, Prof. Eugene N. Feingold of the
political science department, said yesterday.
Prof. Feingold viewed the trip as cultivating an aura of good
feeling. The trip will have a "tenuous, not massive" effect upon im-
proving foreign relations, and it "
probably will not sway many
avowed neutralists and Commu-
nists.
Successful Trip

The trip has been successful so
far in its aim of solidifying friend-
ships (according to Prof. Fein-
gold) and this is its main pur-
pose.
"The trip is not intended to
further Kennedy's own political
career so much as it is meant to
assure American pledges," he com-
mented.
Kennedy Pledges Aid
Kennedy assured West Berliners
yesterday that the United States
will fly planes to the isolated half-
city, keeping the air lanes open to
the West, no matter what Soviet
opposition develops.;
Prof. Feingold discounted any.
major effects the trip might have
in the possible ascendency of Ken-
nedy to the secretary of state or
to the Presidency in 1968. Trips
of this sort are a "very common
thing" among top government of-
fials, he added, and Kennedy is
not .seeking to "form foreign poli-
cy.",
In Berlin, thousands of persons
lined Kennedy's route.

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MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Toppon Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
10:45 a.m. Morning Worship.
7:30 p.m. Open House, 802 Monroe.
THE EVANGELICAL UNITED
BRETHREN CHURCH
Corner of Miller and Newport
John G. Swank, Pastor
Telephone NOrmandy 3-4061
Church;School 10:00 A.M.
Morning Worship 11:00 A.M.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Washtenaw at Forest
The Reverend Leonard Verduin, Pastor
Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan
10:00 A.M. Worship Services
11:15 A.M. Coffee Hour
7:00 P.M. Vesper Worship Service
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756
10:00 A.M. Bible School.
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study.
For Transportation call NO 2-2756.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. John J. Fouser, Assistant
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 a.m., 12:00
Noon and 12:30.
Holyday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 9:00 a.m., 12:00
Noon, 5:10 p.m.
Weekday Mosses: 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 a.m. and
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions: Mother of Perpetual Help,
Wednesday evening, 7:30 p.m.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 p.m.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning prayer on first Sunday of
month.)
11:00 a.m. Morning prayer and sermon
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month.)
7:00 p.m. Evening Prayer. Rev. Franklin
Bennett.
TUESDAY-
7 -AAm Lu rtwn. ni

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth-Ave.
Rev. -Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
9:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Morning Worship.
7:30 p.m. Evening Guild, 802 Monroe.
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Rev. Edgar Edwards, Student Minister
Guild House at 524 Thompson
Services 9:30 and 11:00 a.m. Sermon Topic:
"Religion Helps Marriage."
BibleuLecture: 10:20-10:40, Mrs. Fred E.
Luchs.
Church School, crib-12th grade, 9:30 and
11:00 a.m.
Student Guild: 802 Monroe, telephone 2-5189.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST STUDENT CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron-NO 3-9376
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul Light, Campus Minister
Mr. George Pickering, Intern Minister
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m. Campus Discussion Class, Coffee
Hour
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
7:00-8:00 P.M. Open House, Campus Center.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill Street at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder,. Pastor
Miss Anna M. Lee, Counselor
Phone: NO 8-7622
SUNDAY
9:30 A.M. Worship Service
9:45 A.M. Bible Study
11:00 A.M. Worship Service and Communion.
7:00 P.M. "Christian Courtship and Mar-
rioge"-Pastor Yoder, Speaker.
THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
OF ANN ARBOR AND THE
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
1432 Washtenow
NO 2-3580
Sunday Services: 9:00 and 10:30 Rev. Elmer
Homrighausen, Dean of Princeton Theologi-
cal Seminary.
11:50 Rev. Jack Borckardt.
CAMPUS CENTER
10:30 A.M. Bible Study, "The Book of Acts,"
Campus Center.
6:30 P.M. Quest and Question at Campus
Center.

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenow at Berkshire
Rev. Erwin Goede
The sermon topic for Sunday, February 25, will
be: The Thought of Albert Camus. Ill.
"Between Despair and Hope."
Adult Discussion Group at 10:00
Church School at'10:30.
Church Service at 11:00.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST;
1833 Washtenow Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday Services. ;
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
A free reading room Is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Hours are Monday through Sot.
and holidays. Morwfay evening 7:00 to 9:00
urday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. except Sundoys
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Thomas C. Park, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and at 11:15: Worship Services,
Sermon by the Pastor, "The Word-Imper-
ishable Seed" (Communion3 in both serv-
ices).
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible study groups.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dqnt Club, Supper-Program, "The Bible and
Science/' the Rev. Dr, Paul Zimmerman,
speaker.
Tues. at 6:00: Married Couples Supper. Phone
for reservations.
Wed. at 10:00: Midweek Evening Devotion.
Friday at 7:00: Chapel Choir.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister 1
Rev. Gene Ransom, Campus Minister

NORTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
2250 Fuller Road (Opposite V.A. Hospital)
NOrmandy 3-2969
William S. Baker, Minister

I

Morning Worship 10:45 a.m.
Church School and Child Care.

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MONDAY
9:00 P.M. Coffee and Concern,
servatory.

9:00 and 11:'15 A.M. Morning Worsi
"Christianity is in the Present Tense." S
mon by Dr. Rupert. The Service is bro
cast at 11:15 A.M. on station WOIA.
10:15 A.M. Seminar on World Understandi
Cuba. Speaker, Mr. Hector Rodriquez. P
Room.
7.00 P.M. Worship and Program: Workcor
ing in Mexico. Speaker, The Rev. Willi
Hutchinson, Wayne State University.
WEDNESDAYS
7.00 lA-MAA Wv Commnn. Chae. folo

217 S. Ob-

WEDNESDAY
4:15 P.M. Noise of Solemn Assemblies. Protes-
tant Foundation, 536 Thompson.

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