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February 24, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Chinese Revolts Similar COMMUNITY CENTER:
Sex Problems To Britton's 'Pattern' Board Extends P

By SANDRA JOHNSON
Analyzing the Chinese revolu-
tion, Prof. Meribeth Cameron, aca-
demic dean of Mount Holyoke Col-
lege, pointed out that elements
typical of traditional Chinese, the
American, and European revolu-
tions are blended together in this
upheaval.
After erupting in 1911-12 with
the overthrow of old Manchu rul-
ers, and then passing through the
uneasy period of the Republic un-
der Sun Yat-sen, the prolonged
stages of the revolution lead fin-
ally to, the Communist take-over
in 1945, Prof. Cameron, a special-
ist in Far Eastern history, ex-
plained Wednesday.
At present this revolution is
passing through its last stages, but
is not yet complete, she contin-
ued.
Chinese Tradition
Unlike other nations China has
had a tradition of revolution, Prof.
Cameron said.
The establishment, reign, and
eventual overthrow of dynasties
is a cycle often repeated in Chi-
nese history. These recurrent rev-
olutions may have enabled China
to adjust periodically to changing
times and thus served to hold off
a single, deep-cutting rebellion,
she said.
The modern Chinese revolution
can likewise be regarded as part
of a modernizing process, Prof.
Cameron indicated. However, this
revolution is not the same as those
of the past.
"The Communists do not believe
they are coming into power only
to fade away in the traditional
fashion. And I suspect," she add-
ed, "they may be right."
Opposes Colonialists
In addition to its traditional
Chinese nature, the revolution al-
so has some similarity to those of
North and South America. Like
the Mexicans, the Chinese sought
to rid themselves of the domin-
ance of foreigners.
China itself was never owned
by a foreign power; yet so adverse
to Chinese interests were the trea-
ties that China signed with the
Western nations,that it has been
said that China was a colony of
every country that signed a trea-
ty with her, Prof. Cameron point-
ed out.
Such ill-treatment deeply hu-
miliated the Chinese nation that
had for so long regarded itself as
the most culturally superior nation
in the world.
Thus the revolution can be
viewed as a manifestation of this
antagonism against non-Chinese.
Western Features
Prof. Cameron also found evi-
dence of imported Western char-
acteristics in Chinese Revolution.
Using Crane Britton's analysis of
features common to all revolutions
in his "Anatomy of Revolution" as
a guide, she demonstrated how the
Chinese revolution followed the
normal pattern to a very great ex-
tent.
Just as in France, England and
Russia before their revolutions,
there existed in' China in 1911
much dissatisfaction with the old
regime. Developing classes felt
held down. Intellectuals were cri-
ticizing rather than supporting the
rulers. The government itself was
having extreme financial prob-
lems.
As in European revolutions, the
revolutionaries succeeded quite
easily in overthrowing the old rul-
ers. The Republic which followed
corresponds to the stage in the
revolutionary process in which
moderates control the government.
The usurpation by the Commu-
nists in 1949 Prof. Cameron liken-.
ed to the normal take-over by the
To Explain

VISA Project
Eric Johnsen, director of the
Voluntary International Service
Abroad program of the American
Friends Service Committee, will be
at the Friends Center at 4 p.m.
today to speak to students inter-
ested in the program.
VISA, which has been referred
to as the Quaker "peace corps,"
sends young people overseas for
two years to do voluntary com-
munity work in underdeveloped
nations to promote social, educa-
tional and technical improvement
in these areas.

Be happy today at 1,3 5, 7,9 P.M. DIAL NO 5-
A RIOTOUS NEW TWIST IN THEIE
ART OF GENTLE PERSUASION!
THOSE PILLOW TALK" PLAYMATES ARE AT IT AGAIN
IN A NEW HILARIOUS LOVE STORY'
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