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January 31, 1964 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-01-31

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1961

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1964

SGC Makes Appointments
To Joint Judiciary Council

GOSLING POLICY CONTROLS COSTS:
'U' Press Finances Finally Climb Toward Black

By MARY LOU BUTCHER
Student Government Council
Wednesday night approved five
appointments to Joint Judiciary
Council.
The new members are: Joel
Bernstein, '66; Linda Brett, '65;
Jacqueline Lupovich, '66; and
Evan Wilner, '65. Incumbent Su-
zanne Sherwood, '65, will retain
her seat.
Council also adopted a motion
submitted by Treasurer Douglas
Brook, '65, calling for a letter to
be sent to all congressmen from
Council Units
Open Positions
Positions are open on seven
Student Government Council com-
mittees: Those interested should
visit or phone the SOC offices inj
the SAB today. Positions are
available on the following com-
mittees: student activities, stu-'
dent concerns, University affairs,
United States National Student
Association, H u m a n Relations'
Board, public relations board and
Cinema Guild.

Michigan urging them to support
tax relief for parents of college
students.
The motion stipulated that a
telegram be sent to Rep. Wilbur
Mills (D-Ark), chairman of the
House Ways and Means Commit-
tee, urging him to "schedule an
early hearing on the bills present-
ed by Congressmen Charles Cham-
berlain and James Bromwell which
would provide tax credit relief for
the parents of college students."
In further action, Council en-
dorsed a motion presented by
Daily Editor Ronald Wilton, '64,
recommending that a student
"State of the University" address
should be proposed to the presi-
dent of the University Senate. The
motion called for the president of
SGC to work with the Senate pres-
ident toward "institutionalizing a
speech on the student's view of the
state of the University to be given
before the whole Senate.
A motion presented by Admin-
istrative Vice-President Sherry
Miller, '65, advocating the exten-
sion of voting rights to eighteen-
year-olds was also supported by
Council. Letters will be sent out
informing other schools and "ap-
propriate legislators" of SGC's
views.

(Continued from Page 1)

. - I

I ---- - ---

come declined only $279 thou-
sand.
The sizeable decline of $149,000
in sales from 1960-61 to 1961-62,
while expenses went down only
$22,000, seems, when taken in iso-
lation, to contradict the notion
that expenses are declining faster
than sales..
Promotion by Mail
But, Gosling explained, 1962-63
was an unusually unlucky year.
While in two previous years the
Press had had four and five new
volumes of its popular and lucra-
tive "History of the Modern
World" series to sell, in 1962-63 it
had only two.
Moreover, a test promotion of
100,000 direct mailings sent out
on the Histories failed to provide
the minimum one per cent re-
Group Continues
Performances

GLENN GOSLING

turns and was discontinued as be-
ing unprofitable.
Since the Histories are sold pri-
marily by direct mail, their poor
showing was the major factor in
the sales decline, Gosling said.
According to him, it is impos-
sible to predict such things in
the publishing business. In addi-
tion to seasonal variations, there
may be whole years in which cer-
tain books, quite by chance, will

not sell as well as in other years1
or as well as other books.l
Cost Control Policy
It was indicative of Gosling's!
policy of controlling costs that
sales efforts by mailings were dis-
continued. Even if a large number f
of books had been sold, the ex-
pense would have been too high
in relation to the income the books
brought.
Gosling said that the "better
control of costs" policy has been
applied to all other areas of the
Press' operations.
Figures for the first two quar-
ters of 1963-64 indicate that sales
are back on their way up, with ex-
penses rising at a slower pace. The
six month's figures are $6480 above
similar ones for last year in sales
and $9633 below last year at this
time in expenses.
Crucial Question
Just whether or not these finan-
cial policies are actually affecting
the quality of books being pub-
lished by the Press is a crucial but
extremely difficult thing to de-
termine. Has the Press been mak-
ing more money because it is pub-
lishing fewer scholarly but less
profitable books?
According to the number of
new books publishedeach year, the
Press is doing well. Since 1959-60
this figure has increased from 35
to 44; while this year it might be
one or two lower, Gosling says
that it is the trend and not yearly
fluctuations that are important.
A more subjective measure,
opinions on the quality of the
books coming out of the Press,
seems to indicate the same thing.
According to Dean William Haber
of the literary college, "The vol-
umes published and contemplat-
ed are hardly the sort that a com-
mercial press would grab because
they'd get rich.
"It is a compliment if a press
can publish scholarly works in
which people are also interested,"
Dean Haber said. He has the im-

pression that the Press is doing Books Competition. The contest,
better financially at least partly for commercial and college presses,'
because it has a better "system of selects books whose design contrib-
communicating its ware. The utes to the effectiveness of their'
Press's volumes are pretty impres- content.
sive, many of them on highly lit- Prof. Warner G. Rice, chairman.
erary subjects," he commented. of the English department, com-
Dean Haber's comment is borne mented that the Press "has been
out by an award the Press won last
year when four of its volumes were very hospitable to manuscripts
chosen for the 1963 Midwestern that have been turned in to it.".

A
R

"A Taste of
Delaney will
ances tonight
8 p.m. in the
Theatre.

Honey" by Shelagh
continue perform-
and tomorrow at
Lydia Mendelssohn

Seeks End
Of 'Maj ors'
By Intercollegiate Press
KINGSTON, R.I.-The under-
graduate program in colleges of
arts and sciences should be ex-
tended to five years -and speciali-
zation by "majors' in these col-
leges should be dropped where
possible, President , Francis H.
Horn of the University of Rhode
Island believes.
The job of bringing "more wis-
dom into the affairs of man and
of nations" and in coping with
the explosion of knowledge canj
"no longer be done . . . in the
traditional four years, increasingly
being compressed into three," he
said.
Suggesting that "as much spe-
cialization as possible should be
postponed to the graduate school,"
Horn decried the tendency "to
mold the college of arts and
sciences into a lower-level copy
of the graduate school."
The impetus to re-shape the
college, he declared, will not come
from its faculty, they constitute
a stronghold of conservatism and
are resistant to change. "Real
educational reform will depend
upon the sort of leadership aca-
demic administrators give to the
task,' he added.

As an idicato ofhw el
the Press serves the University, at
least 13 of the more than 40 books
that will come out this year are
authored. by University faculty.
-1-

TRAVEL, INC.
is pleased to
announce that we will be
open until 7:00 p.m.
every Friday night begin-
ning Feb. 1 in order to offer
a fuller service for students
and faculty. We will be
open until 5:00 the rest of
the week.
INC.

(

Would You Like to Read and Speak
MODERN HEBREW?
STUDENTS MAY STILL REGISTER
FOR HILLEL'S CLASSES
Phone 3-4129 or come for details

400 MAYNARD

0 NO 5-3733

I
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:" r .n ..w wt w.55.sw:4 .F"?. n . h ' . , A{:wn..".o rva:~ t - :.Sn... .t vtt:.".:C,...S... ,1

B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation

1429 Hill St.

I.

_

I

4

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Build-
ing before 2 p.m. of the day pre-
ceding publication, and by 2 p.m.
Friday for Saturday and Sunday.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 31
Day Calendar
Institute of Continuing Legal Edu-
cation Lecture Series-Complete Uni-
form Commercial Code Program: Rack-
ham Bldg., 9 a.m.
Track - Mich. Relays: Yost Field
House, 1 and 7:30 p.m.
Dept. of Astronomy Colloquium -
Freeman D. Miller, Prof. of Astronomy,
"Current Cometary Problems": Room
807, Physics-Astronomy Bldg., 4 p.m.
Cinema Guild - Wajda's "Kanal"
(Grand Prize, Cannes): Architecture
Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
Hockey - U-M vs. Colorado: Mich.
Coliseum, 8 p.m.
Chemistry Lecture: "Infrared Spec-
troscopy of the Hydrogen Bomb," Prof.
N. D. Sokolov, Inst. of Theoretical
Chemistry, Moscow, at 8 p.m., Room,
1300 Chemistry Bldg.
Personnel Techniques Seminar No.111
-Dr. William M. Battler will speak on
"How to Improve Supervisory Commu-
nication Skills." In the Michigan Un-
ion at 8:30 a.m.
Biological Chemistry Colloquium -
Dr. David Schlessinger, Washington
Univ. School of Medicine, will speak
on "Ribosemes and Bacterial Mem-
branes" or "The Paradox of the Ribo-
semes." At 4 p.m. in M6423 Medical
Science Bldg.
General Notices
Student Government Approval of the
following student-sponsored activities
becomes effective 24 hours after the
publication of this notice. All publicity
for these events must be withheld un-
til the approval has become effective.
International Students' Assoc. Inter-
national Mixer, Feb. 1, 8-12 p.m.,
Union Ballroom.
Engineering Council, Smothers Broth-
ers Concert, Feb. 29, 8 p.m., Hill Aud.
Summary of Action Taken by Student
Government Council at Its Meeting of
January 29, 1964
Approved: Permanent recognition as
student organization for Wolverine
Club.
Approved: Calendaring of Conference
on the University for Feb. 21, 22, 1964.
Revied Favorably: Appointments to
Joint Judiciary Council.
Adopted: Election rules for Spring
1964 Council and campus elections.
Approved: Recognition of the Univer-
sity of Michigan Amateur Radio Club.
Approved: Name change of the Grace
Bible Guild to the Alpha-Omega Fel-
lowship.

Approved: New articles of the Univer-
sity of Michigan Sailing Club.I
Received: Report from the CommitteeI
on Student Concerns.j
Received: Report from the Human
Relations Board.
Adopted: That the President of SGC
shall contact the President of the Fac-
ulty Senate with a view towards insti-
tutionalizing a speech on the stu-
dent's view o fthe State of the Uni-
versity, to be given before the whole,
Senate. Such a speech would be given
once a year within the first two weeks
of the second semester. The first
speech would be given next year.
Postponed: Consideration of a report
on the proposed course description
booklet.
Adopted: That letters be sent to the
Michigan congressional and senatorial
delegation and to Rep. Wilbur Mills
concerning tax credits for education.
I Adopted: Motion reaffirming Council's
support of legislation to extend the
voting franchise to those eighten years
old.
Postponed: Discussion of year-round
operations of the University.
Women's Research Club meeting,
.Mon., Feb. 3 ,at 8 p.m. in the West
Conference Room of the Rackham Bldg.
Dr. Elzada Clover, Prof. of Botany and
curator in Botanical Gardens, will de-
scribe t'Interesting Plants of Northern
Michigan, including Some Iselands in
Lakes Michigan and Huron." Refresh-
ments will be served.
Events
The following student sponsored
events are approved for the coming
weekend. Social Chairmen are reminded
that requests for approval for social
events are due in the Office of Student
Affairs not later than 12 o'clock noon
on the Tues. prior to the event.
JAN. 31--
Taylor House, Open, Open.
1FEB. 1-
Adams, Open Open 8-12; Adams, Ex-
change Dinner 5:30-7; Alpha Delta Phi,
I Record Party; Alpha Sigma Phi, House
Party; Beta Theta Pi, Band Party; Chi-
cago, Open Open; Cooley House, Open
Open; Delta Sigma Delta, Pledge For-
mal; Delta Sigma Phi, Dance Party;
Delta Tau Delta, Party; Robert Frost,
Open Open; Greene House, Open Open;
Hayden. Open Open; Hinsdale, Open
Open; Kappa Alpha Psi, Party; Lamb-
da Chi Alpha, Bundle Party; Michigan,
Open Open; Oxford Housing, Party in-
formal.
Phi Delta Phi, Dance; Phi Delta The-
ta, House Party; Phi Epsilon Pi, Party;
Phi Kappa Tau, Dance; Phi Sigma
Delta, Fireside; Psi Upsilon, Skating
Party; Reeves, Dance after concert;
Scott, Open Open; Sigma Alpha Epsilon,
Dance; Sigma Alpha Mu, House Par-
ty; Sigma Chi, Dance; Tau Delta Phi,
Late Party; Taylor, Dance; Theta Chi,
Dancing Party; Triangle, Dance; Wen-
ley, Open Open; Winchell, Open Open
9-12; Winchell, Rec Room Party 9-1.
FEB. 2-
Geddes, Open Open.

mer Study program with courses in
art, art history, Italian civilization and
music. Also tours to Italian cities. For
further info. & applications, write to:
Pius XII Institute Committee, Rosary
College, River Forest, Ill. 60305.
Adams State College, Alamosa, Colo.-
Offers programs of graduate study in
summer sessions leading to the MA
degree. Varied curriculum includes:
elem. educ.-bilingual, elem. educ., sec-
ondary educ., guidance & psych., cul-
tural studies & liberal arts. Located
in the cool, San Luis Valley of south-
ern Colo. Write to: Dean, Div. cf Grad-
uate Studies, Adams State College,
Alamosa, Colo., for further info.
Univ. of Arizona-Opportunities for
the academic yr. 1964-65. Teaching
Assistantships, Research Assistantships
& Tuition Scholarships. Many degrees
offered including Doctor of Philosophy,
Doctor of Educ., Doctor of Musical Arts,
MS & MA, etc. Write to Dean of Grad-
uate College, Univ. of Arizona, Tucson,
Ariz., for further info,
Univ. of Arizona-Graduate studies in
Space Science. Administering 10 Na-
tional Aeronautics & Space Admin.
Traineeships in math, engrg. and the
sciences for pre-doctoral programs be-
ginning Sept. 1. The traineeships,
which may be held for 3 yrs., are avail.
In many disciplines. Apply now to:
Graduate College, Univ. of Arizona,
Tucson, Ariz.
SUMMER PLACEMENT:
212 SAB-
American National Red Cross - Helen
M. Grandcolas will interview women
who are entering Jr. or Sr. years this
summer for positions as Jr. Case
Aides & Jr. Recreation Aides. Also men
who are entering the Sr. year for posi-
tions as Field Aides. All jobs are with
selected military hospitals. Interview-
ing at Summer Placement TODAY,
Fri., Jan. 31.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Kordite Corp., Macedon, N.Y.-Sales
Reps.-3. One man in each of the fol-
lowing locations: Chicago, Dayton, Ohio
and Baltimore, Washington or Philadel-
phia. He must live in & be familiar
with his territory. BS or BA in top one-
third of class. 1-3 yrs. closely related
selling exper. Initial assignment to
sell a new meat wrapping film &
packaging system to independent &
chain super markets.
City of Muskegon, Mich. - Seeking
Assistant Planner. Degree with spe-
cialization in municipal planning &
allied fields; including course work
in the social & economic aspects of
municipal planning.
Saginaw General Hospital, Saginaw,
Mich.-Medlcal Technologist. Prefer reg-
istration with the ASCP, but will ac-
cept recent grad eligible to write the
qualifying exam.
U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, N.Y.
City - Analytical Radiochemist-PhD
in physical chemistry or a MS de-

gree with 2 yrs, exper. in development
work relating to radio-chemistry.
Michigan Radio-TV Station-Junior
Account Executive-desire young. man
with some bkgd. in marketing, advertis-
ing promotion who is personable-a real
public rels. type. Will receive training
to sell radio time in the local area.
This position will be in the radio sales
only. BA or MA degree (Bus. Ad. or re-
lated). Broad bkgd. of exper. Will con-
sider a '64 grad.
City of Ann Arbor, Mich.-Real Prop-
erty Appraiser-For the appraisal of
real estate for assessment purposes &
related activities. Degree iwth knowl-
edge of appraisal theory & techniques.
Wilson & Co., Chicago-Advertising
Ass't. Degree & some writing ability
1-2 yts. exper. in adv. and/or sales
promotion desirable. Also positions for
Production Trainee. Degree biology
chem. or related sci. fields.
Conn. Civil Service-1) Social Worker
II-Degree & 1 yr. exper. as Socia
Worker. Apply by Feb. 19. 2) Welfare
Consultant-Degree in sch. of social
work & 3 yrs. in field of medical so-
cial work. Apply by Feb. 13.
Continental Securities Co., Grand
Rapids, Mich.-Openings for 2 or 3 male
graduates who could learn the securi-
ties business & thus qualify to sell se-
curities in one of the following states
Mich., Ohio, Ill. & Ind.
Carrier Corp., Syracuse, N.Y. - 1)
Electronics Engnr.-Circuits Designer-
BS with exper, or recent MS in EE with
bkgd. & itnerests in solid-state circuitry
& electronic systems. 2) Electrical En
gnr.-Controls Specialist-MS with ex
per. or recent PhD. 3) Electrical Engnr
recent grad with electronics option bu
little or no exper. needed.
For further information, please cal
General Div., Bureau of Appointments
3200 SAB, Ext. 3544.

.L
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-z
:d
.
t
t
3,

8:00 P.M.
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
A TASTE
of HONEY
TONIGHT &
TOMORROW N IGHT

DIAL 2-6264
tiENDS SATURDAY
1:00-2:15-4:25
6:40 and 9:00
MirthUl! Magicall Musical!
WALT -.
MOST HILAAROUS
ALLCAORFATURE
01963 Walt Disney Productions TECHNICOLOR*

i

I

off-broadway theatre
THE COACH WITH THE
SIX INSIDES
A Comedy from James Joyce's
Finnegan's Wake
direct from a tour of Japan
and Europe
Institute of Arts Auditorium
John R. at Farnsworth

.. . .................. ........
UNIVERSAL
CITY STUDIOS
DIAL
5-6290
2ND BIG WEEK
"easily one of the most entertaining films
of the year" ..
"Charade" is all winner . . . is all fun.,
"you will have spent a most amusing and
delightful time in the enchanting company
of Audrey Hepburn and Cary Grant
what\more can you ask for?"
-Hugh Holland-Mich. Daily
Gary AuuIeYI
Grant Hepburn
Are having a Love Affair...
Shadowed by Peril! .. .
expect the unexpected in...
: ~ASTANLEY DONE PMUCn
.They
.play it "
.::: fdeightul
.tl.
dngherously!
!.##!-< . ...

" AND 0
"DISNEYLAND AFTER DARK"
. SUNDAY *

ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered organizations only.
Organizations who are planning to be
active for the Spring Semester should
be registered by Feb. 7, 1964. Forms
available, 1011 Student Activities.Bldg.
* * *
Alpha Omega Fellowship, weekly
meeting, Sun., Feb. 2, 10 a.m., Grace
Bible Church, 110 N. Main St.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Lec-
ture by' John French, "Dogmatic or
Dumb?", Jan. 31, 7:30 p.m., Union (3rd
Floor).
* *
Unitarian Student Group, Discussion,
Feb. 2, 7:30 p.m., Unitarian Church,
"Humanism, Part I."

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Placement
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Pius XII Institute-Graduate SchI.
of Fine Arts for women located in
Florence, Italy. Announcing 'the Sum-

NOW

1

DIAL
8-6416

li

freeMIE
freeI X E
free Saturday, Feb. 1, 9-1 a.m.
UNION BALLROOM
everyone welcome (stag orc
DANCING, REFRESHMENTS
ISA-UNION co-sponsors

free
free
free
drag)

"A MOVIE GEM !
So Damned Funny at
Times That You Laugh
Until You Cry! A Work of
Extraordinary Fluidity, Power
And Expressiveness... .
Courtenay's Performance Is
Masterful. An Extremely
Superior British Film. Able
To Compete on Any 10 Best
List of the World This Year!"
-N.Y. Post

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IQC ASSEMBLY ASSOCIATION
presents
DICK GREGORY
(From the Back of the Bus)
in concert with

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I. =mw> sm i. mi! A

l§ 1

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