100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 30, 1964 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Speakers Explore Universities'Finances, Va lues, Policies

Colleges Value
'Wrong' Issues
Collegiate Press Service
CHICAGO-Universities are not
living the values that they osten-
sibly stand for.
Although universities are sup-
posed to be dealing with the most
important issues of the day, they
insead discourage active involve-
ment-and in many cases even
discussion-of these issues. This
was the consensus that emerged
from a two-hour discussion of the
role of the college in developing
democratic values during the re-
cent conference of the Association
for Higher Education.
College faculty members and
administrations-as well as so-
ciety at large-were criticized for
failing to encourage active in-
volvement through concrete expe-
rience in the most important
problems of society.
William Coffin, Jr., Yale's free-
dom-riding chaplain, who recently
was jailed in a Florida civil rights
trip, was the session's featured
speaker.
Heads in Sand
Students find higher education
meaningless because educators
avoid the key issues of society-
in fact they are paid to avoid

them. This has led to failures in
educating students propertly, he
said.
Only by concrete involvement
can students develop a sense of
values, Coffin asserted.
Coffin criticized campuses for
allowing extra-curricular activi-
ties to exist that "promote the
values that universities are trying
to counter in the classrooms."
Fraternities, for example, "for the
most part are monuments to ir-
relevancy in 1964," he said.
He urged support for "import-
ant" extracurricular activties-
those that "try to stimulate an in-
terest in policy."
More students have to choose
"radical" professions, Coffin con-
tinued. Too many now choose at-
tractive rather than important
jobs.

to movie theatres througn the
back door" as against the white
system of segregation, according
to Miss Wright.
Divorced
Most panelists noted that
teaching should not be, but too
often is, separated from real life.
The teacher, Coffin said, has a
moral duty to set an example of
courage and concern for his stu-
dents. Further, a number of dis-
cussants felt that the teacher,
should set an example of partici-
pation in the resolution of the
pressing social problems of the
day.
Wright added that he doesn't'
know who had "bought" so many
of the nation's deans, faculty
members, and chaplains, but they
are as silent as the college presi-
dents.
A number of explanations were
advanced for faculty members'
failures to participate actively in
the resolution of contemporary
problems.

'U' Students
Get Funds
The University has tied with
three other schools for seventh
place in the number. of Woodrow
Wilson National Fellowship win-
ners this year, contrary to a mis-
taken report in Tuesday's Daily.
Nineteen students will receive
Wilson money, along with 19 from
the University of Kansas, from
Northwestern University and from
Duke 'University.
A 20th student, enrolled at
the University's Dearborn Center,
would have the University sharing
sixth-place honors with Yale Uni-
versity, Prof. Otto Graf, director
of the Honors Council, said.
Three schools in fifth place
have 21 winners, and four schools
with 23 winners apiece are tied
for fourth place.
The University was fifth in the
nation last year, but Prof. Graf
said, that the jump to sixth or
seventh is "not as alarming as it
might sound.
"While the regional quota has
not been increased, there are cur-
rently many more schools entering
the competition than in past years.

IS

I

ABRAHAM RIBICOFF
more profitably have been applied
to more serious problems in the.
nation's educational enterprise.
These problems include rectifying
low teachers' salaries and the un-
equal opportunities among states
for students to obtain adequate
education at all levels.
Furthermore, Muirhead said, it
was felt that federal funds could
best be injected directly into the
educational system rather than be
used to give tax relief.

Catalogues Liet
President Stephen J. Wright of
Fisk University, charged that "our
college catalogues are fictions,"
containing "little to buttress ourt
allegation that we are trying tol
develop certain kinds of men."
"Universities are not committed
to anything and as a result stu-
dents are not committed to any-
thing," o mm e n t e d Marian
Wright, an alumna of Fisk and of
Yale and currently a lawyer for
the 'NAACP Legal, Defense and
Education Fund.
We are not being honest with
ourselves on what we believe. Uni-
versities are not taking strong
policy stands to encourage stu-
dents to become involved in is-
sues. In many cases, the students
are "ahead" of the faculty and
administration, she said.
The Southern sit-ins were di-
rected as much against Negro pro-
fessors and college presidents who
"teach equality and then walk in-

STUDENTS and FACULTY
Dial 662-8871 for
Cinema qumaddr
Program Information

AAC Suports Massie College Aid

proposed by Sen. Vance Hartket
(D-Ind).1
The bill being considered would
liberalize the National Defense1
Education Act for loans, federal
scholarships and government in-t
surance of private loans to stu-
dents. It would also provide aa
work-study program, similar to
the one proposed by President
Lyndon B. Johnson in his poverty
message.
Don't Like Plant
AAC officials had previously op-
posed the Hartke program.t
But the group's president, thes
Very Rev. Edward B. Bunn, toldt
the subcommittee that his orga-
nization solidly supports the basic
features of the Hartke bill.
The national organization rep-
resents 848 colleges offering four-
year degree programs. Bunn is
president of Georgetown Univer-
sity.
A Requirement
Bunn said many members of his
organization have reluctantly con-
cluded that a federal scholarship
program "is indispensable to real-
ization of the principle of unre-
stricted educational opportunity."
He added that members were
polled recently and an overwhelm-
ing majority voted for the four
provisions. He described the Hart-
ke bill as "an imaginative and

comprehensive attack on the prob-
lem of student aid."
The AAC's traditional view,
Bunn said, has been that federal
aid is justified only when needed
to attain a goal of national im-
portance not satisfactorily reach-
able by state, local and private
aotion.
Don't Tempt Them
owever, Bunn warned that
thele is a real danger that state
governments might be tempted to
cut back their own provisions for
scholarships and ultimately throw
the whole burden on" the federal
government.
Bunn said the AAC still had
some misgivings about the bill.

IL

do I I woommummooftL

A

I

14

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS (Dept. of Speech)
presents
the Opera Dept. of the School of Music
in Tchaikovsky's tragic opera
THE QUEEN,
OF SPAD ES
in a new ENGLISH version by Prof. Josef Blatt
Tues.-Sat., May 5-9
8.00 P.M.-LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Tues.-Thur., Fri.-Sat.,
$1.75, $1.25 $2.00, $1.50
Box Office Opens Monday, 12:30-5
EXCELLENT SEATING AVAILABLE FOR TUESDAY

.

SPORT
in the USSR
Monthly from the Soviet Union.
In English. Richly illustrated.
About all sports in Soviet Un-
ion, including system of train-
ing
One year subscription-
40 Cents
Imported Publications & Prod.
1 Union Equare, N.Y.C. 3 (M)
First Show at 12:30
Shows at 12:30-2:36-4:50
6:55-9:15

V

I

I

or

r

........

I

I

{

11

s

GREGORY TONY
PECK CURTIS

ENDS
TONIGHT

I

El a
Kozon's

Friday .
"AMERICA, AMERICA"

presented by
THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
1964-1965
CHORAL UNION SERIES
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ............Friday, September 25
JEAN MARTINON, Conductor
ANTONIO AND THE BALLETS DE MADRID.......Thursday, October 8
WARSAW PHILHARMONIC ................Wednesday, October 14
LEONID KOGAN, Violinist from Moscow.......Wednesday, November 4
RADUGA DANCERS from six Soviet Republics .:. . Saturday, November 14
FAUST (Gounod)
New York City Opera Company............Sunday, November 22
MINNEAPOLIS SLMPHONY ORCHESTRA.........Monday, February 8
STANISLAW SKROWACZEWSKI, Conductor
ROSALYN TURECK, Pianist-Bach specialist .........Monday, March 1
ROBERT MERRILL, Baritone.....................Friday, March 12
NATIONAL BALLET OF CANADA ................ Saturday, April 3
Season Tickets: $25.00-$20.00-$17.00-$14.00-$12.00
EXTRA SERIES
LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ...........Friday, October 2..
GEORGI SOLTI, Conductor
IRINA ARKHIPOVA, Mezzo-soprano from Russia .. Monday, November 9
(American debut)
MERRY WIDOW (Lehar)
N.Y.C. Opera Company.............(2:30) Sunday, November 22
BERLIN PHILHARMONIC........ . .'......Saturday, January 30
HERBERT VON KARAJAN, Conductor
POLISH MIME THEATER from Warsaw. . .... . .Saturday, March 6

ad

Shown at 2:00-5:00-8:00 P.M. Daily

Season Tickets:

$12.50-$10.00-$8.50-$7.00-$6.00

CHAMBER ARTS SERIES
SOCIETA CORELLI, from Italy . :............Wednesday, October 28
NEW YORK CHAMBER SOLOISTS..... . Tuesday, November 17
SEGOVIA, Guitarist........... . ..... ..Wednesday, January 20
PARIS CHAMBER ORCHESTRA ..................Sunday, February 14
PAUL KUENTZ, Conductor
Featuring Bach trumpeter, ADOLF SCHERBAUM
NETHERLANDS CHAMBER CHOIR............. Saturday, February 27
FELIX DE NOBEL, Conductor
CHICAGO LITTLE SYMPHONY .................... Sunday, March 7
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor
CnlI nfT n 1AIDbGR ..-

.. f .. f .... ... e
1

')U

11

11

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan