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April 28, 1964 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY,

CIC CONFERENCE:
Trade Ideas About Minorities

Regents Accept Bequests,
Gifts at Monthly Meeting

SORCERER'S APPR ENTIC3:
Mumford Discusses Science

By BARBARA SEYFRIED
The relationship of discrimi-
nation to university housing, so-
cial organizations, employment,
admissions and scholarships was
the topic of discussions at the
Conference on Human Rights of
the Committee on Institutional Co-
operation held recently in Madi-
son, Wis.
"The conference was mainly an
opportunity to exchange ideas and
to see how different schools are
dealing with discrimination prob-
lems," John F6ldkamp, '65L, as-
sistant to the director of student'
activities and organizations, com-
mented.
Feldkamp and Barry Bluestone,
'66, were the University delegates1
to the conference.
Variance
"There is a wide variance amonga
the schools represented," Feld-'
kamp continued. "Some are pri-
vate, some state supported and
each is working out, the problems
in a different way. In the area of
social organizations, at the Uni-
versity of Minnesota it is the
administration that is working on
the discrimination problem. At
the University of Wisconsin, it
is the faculty. Here at the Uni-
versity, it's the students.
"Each delegation was allowed
20 minutes at the conference to
explain what its school is do-
ing to attract more Negroes to its
campus," Bluestone said. "We ex-
plained what Leonard Sai, special
assistant to the director of ad-
missions, was doing in his work
with Negroes, a!Sd- we explained
the University-Tuskegee mutual-
assistance plan.
"We spent ,most of the time
discussing discriminatory clauses
in national charters and discrim-
inatory practices of campus social
organizations," Bluestone added.
Recommendation
One result of the conference
was a recommendation to the CIC
that it contact member schools-
the Big Ten plus the University
of Chicago-and urge them to in-
form social organizations on their
;ampuses that they will not per-
mit organizations to remain af-
filiated with it if they have dis-

BARRY BLUESTONE JOHN C. FELDKAMP

criminatory clauses in their char-
ters or practice discrimination.
"Most universities, however, are
already moving to the point where
they won't allow student orga-
nizations to remain affiliated with
the school if they are discrimin-
ating in the areas of race, na-
tional origin and religion," Blue-
stone added.
"We- found that all the univer-
sities represented at the confer-
ence had admission policies re-
quiring neither that a picture be
sent with the application nor that
race be indicated on the blank,"
Bluestone 'said,
Major Problem
"One major problem pointed out
was that of getting more Negroes
to apply. There is an extremely
small, number of Negroes in the
student body at each university
represented at the conference. The
number of Negroes at the Univer-
sity is about 200 or less.
"Many Negroes don't attend
the CIC universities because they
aren't aware of their opportunity
to attend. Many go elsewhere ,be-
cause they feel the social-psy-
chological environment at a pre-
dominantly white school is too
much to contend with," Bluestone
added.
"To help solve this problem,"
Feldkamp said,' "the University is
trying to recruit people from un-
derdeveloped areas and has es-
tablished a summer institute where
students from areas that aren't
college motivated can come on-
to campus and see what college
is like. The University is also
setting up financial programs to
aid those interested in coming'
here."
"In the talks on housing, Mr.
Feldkamp and myself mentioned
the latest Student Government
Council action and past actions
taken by the Office of Student
Affairs and Housing Bureau to
halt discrimination," Bluestone
said. -
"The latest SGC proposal is to
add health, safety and sanitation
tequirements to the University
approved off-campus. housing con-
tracts. This would make it more
difficult for any landlord to lease
substandard housing. Often mem-
bers of minority groups--foreign
students as well as Negroes-live
in this type of housing. This is
an attempt to raise the living
conditions," Bluestone explained.

"The University has provided a4
positive incentive to landlords to
meet University housing require-
ments. It has tried to make it easy
for those who comply with Uni-
versity regulations to get ten-
ants," he said. "The OSA has not
started blacklisting landlords who
don't comply with University reg-
ulations, like the University of
Minnesota, but it could consider
such an action.
"We found that it is hard for
any university to discriminate in
its hiring of student help mainly
because there are so few Negroes
attending the universities. Of
course this doesn't necessarily pre-
sent a true picture. For example,
there is no centralized hiring'agen-
cy here at the University, and
therefore most 'of the departments
do their own hiring. The Uni-
versity administration can rarely
know of departmental discrimina-
tion if it is going on, or even if
it is going on at all," Bluestone'
continued.
"For non-student help the Uni-
versity has in the past recruited
from predominantly white areas.
At the present time, it is making
attempts to go into non-white
areas to get help.
"Many universities represented
at the conference, we found, were
working to set aside some funds
for Negro scholarships. There
seems to be a trend toward set-
ting up special programs, in oth,
er areas as well as scholarships,
to bring more Negroes to the uni-
versities."
Discriminatory Clauses
"The University hasn't accepted
any scholarships with discrimin-
atory clauses in them since 1947,"
Bluestone claimed.
"Our feeling on scholarships,
which could be termed discrimina-
tory," Feldkamp said, "is that al-
though some of them are restrict-
ed to just Negroes and some to
just whites, there are enough
scholarships without any restric-
tions in them to enable the Uni-
versity to give financial assist-
ance on a non-discriminatory bas-
is."
"We want to eliminate any
chance of discrimination," Blue-
stone declared, "and I feel the
next step is to work on de facto
discrimination which can't be
legislated out of existence. It is
the type that lies in a person's at-
titude."

'The Regents accepted the fol-
lowing gifts at their April meet-
ing:
The estate of Roy S. Campbell,
filed for probate in Bath Coun-
ty, Virginia, provides an estimat-
ed $169,000 through the Alumni
Fund "for any purpose it (the
University) deems proper." Camp-
bell was a 1912 engineering grad-
uate and was given an honoraryl
doctor of engineering degree in
1949.
The estate of Emma 'Louise
Knott, filed for probate in King
County, Wash., provides $5000 for
the operation of the chemistry de-
partment "in memory of my broth-.
er, Albert Jacobson." He received.
an AB in 1903 and was chief chem-
ist to. the city of Seattle for
many years.
The estate of Sarah A. Stew-
art, filed for probate in Butler
County, Ohio, provides approxi-
mately $25,000 "in honor of my
late son, Harry H. Despond" to
conduct research in diseases of
the heart' and circulatory system.
Despond received an AB in 1917
and an LLB in 1921 from the Uni-
versity.
Funds to establish the W. S.
Woytinsky Lectureship Award in
economics were among. $133,000.
in gifts, grants and bequests ac-.
cepted by the Regents.
Common stock wOrth $19,142 Was
given by Mrs. W. S. Woytihsky of
Washington, D.C.. in memory of
her husband,.a world-famous econ-
omist, who died in 1960.
The $1000 award will be confer-
red biennially for "the best book,
article or speech in the broad
field of economics to educate pub-
lic opifion or influence economic
or social policy."
Other gifts included $21,562
from the Automobile Manufactur-
ers AssociatiOn," Inc., Detroit, for
the Association's Research Fund.
Wayne State University provided
$1,750 for the' third quarter al-
location for the Institute of La-
bor and Industrial Relations.
The, Carnegie Corporation of
New York gave $12,000 for an
experimental program of leader-
ship traintg for vocational edu-
cation unde Prof. Ralph C. Wen-
rich of the eucation school.:
From' the McPherson Commu-
nity Health Center, Inc., Howell,
came $10,800 for their Fund.
The E. I. duPont de Nemours &
Company, Wilmington, Del., pro-
vided $10,000 for their Grant-in-
Aid Interior Ballistics Fund un-
der the direction of Prof. Lloyd
E. Brownell of the chemistry and
engineering departments.
From the Inter-Industry High-
way Safety Foundation of Michi-
gan, Ann Arbor, ;came $98001 to
provide scholarships for leader-
ship training for teachers of driv-
er education, under the, direction
of Prof. Almando A. -Ve.zani of
the' education school.

The Michigan Heart Association
provided $7,225 for the Associa-
tion's Dean's Fund.
The National Foundation gave
$6000; $5000 from the New York
office and $1000 from the Wayne
County Chapter to establish the
Dr. J. M. Bandera Fund.
The Sam S. Shubert Founda-
tion, New York, provided $2,750
to establish the Foundation's Fel-
lowship "to be awarded to a
graduate student interested in
writing a full length play."
Mrs. Stuart S. Wall of Toledo
gave $2500 for the Clements Li-
brary Associates Fund in mem-
ory of her late husband.
The State of Michigan provided
$2300 to establish the Institute of
Science and Technology Indus-
trial Development Research As-
sistance Fund.
A total of $2,036 came from the
Ferndale-Pleasant Ridge Universi-
ty of Michigan Club and an an-
onymous donor to establish the
Club Scholarship.-,
The University's Class of 1964
gave $2000 for the construction
and installation of an information
center. "The final design of the
center will be selected in whole
or part from the designs submit-
ted by Prof. Aarre Lahti's design
class, by the 'University's archi-
tects and campusp lanners."
From George A. Schemm of De-
troit camne $2000 through the
Michigan AlumniFundto estab
lish the Bin-Dicator Company
Scholarship. -
Stewart R. Mott of Ann Arbor
gave $1100 for the Berlin Uni-
versity-Hamburg University Schol-
arship.
The Flint Civitan Auxiliary,
Flint, gave $1000 for the Auxil-
iary's Student Loan Fund.
'U' Fellowship
Standing Falls
The University fell from a fifth
place to nineteenth place nation-
ally this year in its number of
Woodrow Wilson National Fellow-
ship winners.
Leading the list of undergrad
uate institutions producing win-
ners in 1964-65 was Harvard Uni-.
versity with 55. Cornell Univer-
sity and Oberlin College follow-
ed with 29 and 24. California, Co-
lumbia, Toronto and Chicago are
all tied for fourth with 23 fel-
lowship recipients.
Each fellowship provides an $1,-
800 stipend, plus tuition and fees
at the graduate school of the re-
cipient's choice.
Tied for fifth place in the num-
ber of Woodrow Wilson Naional
Fellowships awarded for 1964-65
a r e Stratford, Princeton a n d

By THOMAS DeVRIES
Collegiate Press Service
CHICAGO-In a broad attack
on a world of science gone mad,
author Lewis Mumford called
Sunday for "deliberately control-
ling and correcting the automa-
tion of knowledge by addressing
education to larger and central
human purposes."
Recalling the story of the Sor-
cerer's Apprentice, Mumford said
that our civilization has "cleverly
found a magic formula for put-
ting the academic broom and
pails of water to work by them-
selves." But like the apprentice,
we have lost the formula to stop
the process, he 'asserted.
Even in a field as limited as
the study of diseases of the gas-
tro-intestinal tract of elderly
earthworms, he said, "it is diffi-
cult for a conscientious scholar to
keep his head above water.
Seeks To Challenge
"My purpose," he told the con-
vention of the Association of
Higher Education," is to chal-
lenge as scientifically outdated as
well as humanly inadequate the
whole constellation of mechanical
ideas that now dominate our civ-
ilization beginning with the auto-
mation of knowledge.'
He told the 1600 educators as-
sembled for the meeting that
higher education has focused al-
most exclusively on the produc-
tion of mass scientific truths and
that it is "utterlyincapableof
dealing with the most pressing
problem of our age: the larger
system ofautomation of which
it is a part."
As our institutions continue to
develop with their nuclear re-
actors, IBM machines, television,
machine-marked examinations, he
said, the human element disap-
pears. Yet the exponents of auto-
mation "see no way of overcom-
ing its deficiencies except by a
further extension of automation."
Eichmann Ideal
The best name for' this auto-
mation, Mumford told his aud-

LEWIS MUMFORD
ience, is "organized impotence,"
and the ideal hero of it is Adolf
Eichmann, "the current function-
ary, the perfect bureaucrat, proud
to the end that he never/allowed
a moral scruple or a human sen-
timent to keep him from carrying
out the orders that came from,
above."
Mumford laid the blame for the

Of scientists he said: "Over-
proud of their one-generation ac-
quisitions, they point to the fact
that there are now more scientists
alive that an the whole history
of the world before our genera-
tion."
They do not realize, he con-
tinued, that the fund of knowl-
edge now available is "no guar-
antee whatever of our having
sufficient emotional sensitiveness
to make good use of it."
Plenty of 'Em
Mumford predicted that "with-
in a couple of centuries there
will be dozens of scientists for
every man, woman, child and dog
Qn the planet." Fortunately, he
added, such conditions of over-
crowding will 'nave killed off most
of the population before we reach
that point.
"Our task today is to make the
genuine good derived from the
automation of knowledge subser-
vient to the superior, history-
laden functions and purposes of
human culture," he concluded,
but there is no easy way to change
the present trend.

paralyzing increase in knowledge
and its automation to "our inabil-
ity to cope with the proliferation
in scientific information.

k'

I

"""""" .

!'

Attention: FILM-MINDED STIDENTS!
INTERVIEWING FOR
CINEMA GUILD BOARD POSITIONS
will be TONIGHT, APRIL 28, from 7:00 P.M. in
Room 3528 SAB. Sign up now for interview on
door of Cinema Guild office, 2548 SAB.

'

r

....

Departminenzt of Spanish and La Sociedad Hispania
'Present
"LA OTRA ORILLA"
A Play by JOSE LOPEZ RUBIO
2:30 P.M. April 28-29
Trueblood Auditorium, Frieze Bldg.
Tickets 1.00 Available at door
In Spanish

Swarthmore with
with 20.

21. Yale follows

11

Across Campus

1 ________ 1

Ending
Wednesday

4vako

DIAL
8-6416

MAURICE JUDITH,
EVANS ANDERSON
in the GEORGE SCHAEFER producaon
of WlAMSHAKESPEARES
f r, "

The movie "Picture in Your
Mind" will be presented at 7:30
p.m. today in Rm. 3 KLMN of the
Michigan Union. The movie will be.
followed by a lecture and discus-
sion with Singer Buchanan. The
Human Relations Board and the
League and Union Cultural Com-
mittees are sponsoring the pre-
sentation.
Foreign Aid. .
Prof. Hollis B. Chenery will
speak on the subject "Foreign As-
sistance and Economic Develop-
ment" at 8 p.m. today in the
fourth floor Rackham Ballroom.,
Prof. Chenery is a programs ad-
ministrator in the Agency for In-
ternational Development.
Social Seminar-...
Prof. Stephen B. Sweeney will
speak on "Education for Public
Administration" at 8 p.m. today
in the- West Conference Rm. of
Rackham. Prof. Sweeney is the
director of Fels Institute of Local
and State Government at the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania.
This is the last program of the
semester in the social seminar

series sponsored by the Michigan
chapter of the American Society
for Public Administration.
Administration .
"The Nature of Business Admin-
istration" will be the topic of a
speech by Prof. Ray E. Brown of
Duke University at 4 p.m. today
in 'Rm. 141 of the Business Ad-
ministration Bldg. Prof. Brown is
professor of hospital administra-
tion at Duke and chairman of the
National Task Force on Hospital
Facilities.
Eight Preludes .. .
Reid Nibley will give a lecture
recital on the Eight Preludes by
Frank Martin at 4:15 p.m. today
in Aud A. Nibley is currently in
the University's Doctor of Musical
Arts Program under Gyorgy San-
dor.
'Sunday',. .
"Sunday in New York," a com-
edy by Norman Krasna, opens at
8:30 p.m. today in Trueblood Aud.
as the second offering in the 1964
Ann Arbor Drama Season. Ty
Harden stars.

>K*
y ,,
>. ,

:ANN ARBOR DRAMA S EA SON I
A professional season OPENS
* U
of five plays since 1930 TOMORROW
nwrninminarnrnwwm mimmmi nmmm riMinmwwI

Television's
TY HARDINI!
in person
in

Dial 2-6264
STARTING
WEDNESDAY

ENDING TODAY
WINNER OF 4
ACADEMY AWARDS!
"TOM JONES"
Shows at 1:30-400
6:30 and 9:00.

1

pRESLEY
$'~AI W 10P Ol4dWQ oe7AC O

SUNDAY IN NEW YORK
riotous sophisticated -comedy
April 29-May 2
Trueblood Auditorium
' SPECIAL OFFER
to introduce students to Drama Season
Buy a $.25 or $3.50 ticket-
bring date or friend FREE!

6'

The Living Sound of
GREAT FOLIMUSIC
ON 20TH CENTURY-lOU RECORDS
ALL THE FOLK THERE BOB CAREY -THE INTRODUCING THE
IS Today's most tal- SOUL OF FOLK Bob's WELL-ROUNDED DICK
ented folk artists-The thrilling style adds GLASS The record de-
Greenbriar Boys, Logan "soul" and new feeling but of one of the most
English, JudyRoder- to this great collection versatile new folk
.t t anv nt .n , nffni cn,. artsts n lthe curresnt

/

BOX OFFICE OPEN
in Frieze Bldg.-10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
NO 3-6470 or Univ. Ext. 2235

.
-__''

(a.

First Show at 12:30
Shows at 12:30-2:36-4:50
6:55-9:15

\..

GREGORY TONY
PECK CURTIS

"
.

EVENINGS
WEDNESDAY thru SATURDAY-8:30 P.M.
*TI~udets: MATIN EES
THURSDAY and SATURDAY-2:30 P.M.
Students: Any Show, $1.25 in balcony

Eves. Orch. $4.25, 3.50, 2.50

am everv angie . fs * ml

I I

I

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