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April 28, 1964 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-28

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TUESDAY, APRIL 28, 1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TREE

TUESDAY. APRIL 2S, 1964 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Court Backs Cuts
In Fireman Jobs
Lets Stand Decision of Arbitration
Board; Could Elininate 48,000 Jobs
WASHINGTON MP-The lingering railroad work-rules dispute
moved another step toward settlement yesterday when the Supreme
Court let stand an arbitration ruling which could eliminate up to
48,000 jobs.
The high tribunal rejected, 8-0, an appeal by four on-train
brotherhoods from, the congressionally created arbitation board's
ruling of last November to allow dropping of firemen and other
crewmen whose jobs the carriers find unnecessary. Justice Arthur

Yemen Plans To Reveal
Governmental Changes
SAN'A YEMEN () - The Yemeni Republican government, after
five days of talks with visiting Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nas-
ser, prepared yesterday to announce a new constitution, parliament
and cabinet.
Authoritative sources said the sweeping changes will maintain
Abdullah Sallal as president, but add as prime minister Hamud El

-

GM Denies NAACP

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HENRY CABOT LODGE

See Results
Of Balloting
By The Associated Press
BOSTON - Political observers
yesterday saw President Lyndon
B. Johnson and Ambassador Hen-
ry Cabot Lodge as the big vote-
getters in today's Massachusetts
presidential preference primary.
There are no provisions on the
ballot for presidential candidates,
but voters are pemitted to ex-
press their choices by a write-in
vote.
In Philadelphia, Gov. William
W. Scranton's stature as a po-
tential Republican presidential
candidate will be rated by the re-
sults of his home state's primary
also today.
Write-Ins
Presidential preference voting
in Pennsylvania is also by write-
? in participation.
Scranton backers, apparently
acting on their own, are behind
a drive to get an outpouring of
write-ins that will cause the gov-
ernor to change his stand on ac-
cepting the nomination only if
a "sincere and honest" draft is
offered by the convention.
Students of the political situ-
ation in Massachusetts say Lodge
can be expected to draw the most
because of his role as a favorite
son and his favorable showing in
the New Hampshire preference
primary last month.
On the Democratic side, observ-
ers say Johnson most likely will
be the big write-in vote-getter,
but. the number of votes given
Attorney General Robert F. Ken-
nedy will be carefully appraised.
No Campaigns
None of the Republican presi-
dential hopefuls have campaigned
in Pennsyvania but backers of
Sen. Barry Goldwater (R-Ariz),
zay they expect to pick up six to
eight of the 54 convention dele-
gates chosen tomorrow. Scranton
has asked for an unpledged dele-
gation, with himself as chairman
in a "favorite son" role.
Goldwater forces say anything
less than 800,000 write-ins for
Scranton should be regarded as
repudiation of him as presiden-
tial timber, but Craig Truax,
state GOP chairman and a lead-
er in the group trying to convince
Scranton he should announce im-
mediately as a candidate, calls
this claim ridiculous.
Truax says he is hopeful of
100,000 votes. He points to the dif-
ficulty of writing-in names on au-
tomatic machines and says he
doubts one voter in five will take
the time.

J. Goldberg, former secretary of
labor, took no part in the decision.
No Reason Given
The brief order gave no reason
for the decision, saying merely
"the petitions for writs of certior-
ari are denied."
The action comes on the heels
of last Thursday's agreement
hammered out under President
Lyndon B. Johnson's prodding for
settlement of other issues in the
five-year-old dispute. Both sides
began yesterday the job of getting
that agreement into contract
form for submission to the unions
for ratification.
The brotherhoods could ask the
Supreme Court to reconsider its
decision but the unanimous vote
in yesterday's ruling is likely to
discourage any such step. The way
also is left open for the brother-
hood to strike later on the job
elimination issue, after the arbi-
tration runs out in 1966, but there
was no immediate indication that
they would seek to do so.
Unsettled Issue
The only other issue not settled
by last week's negotiations in-
volves inter-division runs. This
was set aside for ironing out later.
Union spokesmen indicated aft-
er yesterday's ruling was an-
nounced that they will seek to
have the board modify its award
to the railroads when the board
meets here May 7, the date on
which, by mutual agreement, the
award will become effective.
"We were hopeful that the Su-
preme Court would rule that the
arbitration law was class legis-
lation. We will comply with ,he
law when the arbitration board
makes its interpretation May 7,"
Charles Luna, president of the
AFL-CIO Brotherhood of Rail-
road Trainmen, said.
Railroad spokesmen declined to
comment on the ruling, except to
say that the board's ruling would
go into effect on May 7.
A spokesman for the AFL-CIO
Brotherhood of Locomotive Fire-
men and Enginemen said an ef-
fort would be made to argue the
interpretation of the next step
when the board meets.
Congress set up the arbitration
board in August of last year.

Jaeify, a former army officer who+
was an early revolutionary and
most recently ambassador to
Cairo.
First Constitution
The changes represent the first
time ancient Yemen has ever had
a constitution or parliament and
a prime minister type govern-
ment.
It evidently is hoped the new
setup will attract broader support
from Yemen's tribal structure and
further weaken Monarchists still
holding out in mountain redoubts
after 19 months of civil war.
Help Nasser
The changes also will strength-
en Nasser's position in forthcom-
ing peace talks with Saudi Ara-
bian Prime Minister Prince Feisal,
who is pledged to the ousted Yem-
eni monarchy of Imam Moham-
med El Badr.
Backed by 30,000 Egyptian
troops pledged to remain here
until Yemen is secure, the Repub-
licans now control all the major
towns and most of the country-
side.
Add Strength
El Jaeify, who is widely respect-
ed by most anti-Monarchists, is
expected to add much strength to
the regime, which .has been fre-
quently ineffectual in administer-
ing the country since the revolu-
tion.

World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
P A R I S - Paris and Peking
named their ambassadors yester-
day, completing the French-Red
Chinese diplomatic link forged
by French President Charles de
Gaulle three months ago to the
dismay of the West.
S* *
DALLAS-Jack Ruby, described
by his lawyers as a man whose
"mind is falling apart," will get
a jury trial to determine if he is
now insane and should be com-
mitted to a mental hospital.
In response to a request for a
sanity trial filed by Mrs. Eva
Grant, Ruby's sister, Judge Joe B.
Brown said he would begin em-
paneling a jury at the first suit-
able date. Texas law requires that
a judge hold such a trial if the
defense asks for it.
* * *
NEW YORK-The stock market
underwent another sharp decline
yeserday on lower volume. The
Dow-Jones averages showed 30
industrials down 3.02, 20 rails
down 1.24, 15 utilities down .41
and 65 stocks down 1.20.

(First in a Series)
By JOHN WEILER
Special To The Daily
DETROIT-The charges of dis-
crimination in General Motors'
hiring practices two weeks ago by
the National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People
were only the first in a series to
be leveled at the auto industry.
Why GM first?
Arthur Johnson, executive sec-
retary of the Detroit branch NA-
ACP, explained:
-General Motors is the largest
corporation participating in gov-
ernment contracts where discrim-
ination is strictly prohibited.
-GeneralMotors is the second
largest corporation in the world.
-General Motors "has a history
of not moving as it should with
respect to equal opportunity for
Negroes."
One General Motors official said
he was "mystified" when he first
learned of the charges. He said
that "they may charge we are the
biggest but they can't charge we
are the worst."
Not Alone
Johnson added that this does
not mean that GM "is alone in
its practices." He indicated that
charges to be issued against other
corporations are still in the plan-
ning stage and will be announced
following the May 4 demonstration
against GM.
Specifically the NAACP is
charging General Motors with
concentrating Negroes employed
by the corporation in less skilled
and less desirable jobs, both in
northern and southern GM plants.
Herbert Hill, labor secretary of
the NAACP, said recently that a

survey taken by himself of selected
General Motors plants across the
country revealed that Negroes in
northern General Motors plants
are concentrated in the foundry,
forges, heat treating and paint
spraying sections of the plants.
In southern plants, he said, they
are primarily janitors and sweep-
ers.
Soon To Come
The specific findings of Hill's
survey are expected to be released
at a press conference scheduled-
to be held in Detroit during the
May 4 demonstration.
Hill and other NAACP officials
have emphasized that they do not
care how many Negroes G4 now
employs as long as the Negroes it
does employ are in all sections
of the company,
Hill stressed the "occupational
distribution"-the employment by
both regions and occupations-as
the main issue.
' 9.4 Per Cent
But General Motors officials
have continually contended that
the more than 45,000 "non-whites"
of 515,000 total employes were
hired because of their abilities
and not by any other standards.
(Non-white is a government clas-
sification, which includes approxi-
mately 99 per cent Negroes.)
A General Motors statement
adds that the average wage of Ne-
groes employed by the company 4s
"in excess of $6000. This means'
they are in the top one-third in-
come group in the nation."
All Around
One high GM official said that
General Motors employes Negroes
in all branches of its corporation
-"as engineers, researchers, su-
pervisors, draftsmen, accountants,

Charges
librarians, foreman, skilled trades-
men and general office workers, as
well as in a wide variety of main-
tenance and production jobs."
But Johnson contended that
GM at the salaried level is pri-
marily a "white organization."
A GM official said that GM fills
executive positions almost entirely
by promotion within the ranks;
the "boss" is rarely hired from
outside the company.
High Demand
He said that GM actively re-
cruits Negroes from all reputable
schools across the country. "They
are in high demand and have
many jobs offered to them other
than ours."
However, he noted that in areas
where the Negro population is
small, it is difficult to find Ne-
groes to hire.
He added that GM makes avail-
able the opportunity for all quali-
fied high schools student to train
for skilled jobs in the company.
The official admitted that the
tests were hard, but definitely not
intended to select anyone on a
basis of his race.
Johnson
Johnson said that the NAACP
expects GM to hire Negroes in all
areas of the country whether or
not there is a high Negro popula-
tion. He noted that this is the only
way GM can end discrimination.
Johnson said that GM has defi-
nitely improved its practices in
recent years but that they still do
not come up to the standards set
by the NAACP. Hill characterized
their progress as "less than
token."
TOMORROW: Supporting Ne-
gro colleges; disagreement with-
in the ranks.

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