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April 22, 1964 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22,

TWO TIlE MiChIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22,

i
2

OUTH'S PROBLEM:
Schools Controlled by Politics

SGC Plans
Repeat of

_ ,_._ .__.......__. _ .__,.w_____

By DICK WINGFIELD

i

"Economically, politics has a
strong bearing upon higher edu-
cation in the South," Prof. Arn-
old D. Albright of the University
of Kentucky said here yesterday.
"Since the medical report on;
the effects of tobacco, pressure
from various sectors has encour-
aged the University of Kentucky
to establish a research center to
do more examination of the ef-
fects of tobacco on health. The
political angle appears in con-
nection with the sale of tobacco.
"There is, of course, the strong
connection between politics and
the racial aspect of higher educa-
tion. A point at issue was the in-
cident at the University of Mis-
sissippi. Immediately following the
incident, the Southern Association
of Educators sent a delegation to
the university to determine what
had transpired."'
Their recommendations did not
dissuade Gov. Ross Barnett's tac-
tics, however. This might illu-
strate the strength that a South-
ern governor has over higher edu-
cational institutions, he com-
mented.
School Sites
"Besides being influential in
racial and similar matters, the
governor and legislature can in-
fluence the location of commun-
ity and junior colleges which are
presently blossoming. When there
is an appropriation for a new col-
lege, legislators maneuver to have
it located in their own district. As
a result, some communities have
a project foisted upon them which
they hadn't considered at all."
Prof. Albright felt that athletics
is another area in which political
influence is strong in higher edu-
cation.
"We might refer to a non-segre-
gated university, recruiting a
young man withexcellent basket-
ball abilities. He is a Negro. As-
suming that the university is for-
tunate enough to acquire him,
what would happen if Alabama
or Mississippi appeared on its
schedule? These schools are seg-
regated.

is also connected to higher edu-
cation, Prof. Albright pointed out..
"The presence of horse ranches in
our immediate vicinity is a strong
influence upon our university to
institute a ranch for equine re-
search."
The livestock breeders have a
a strong interest in this research
and petition the governor who di-
rects them to contact the uni-
versity for provisions.
Horse Virus

. I

breeders would like this research
on a permanent basis, he said.
Prof. Albright pointed out that
legislation in the state can in-
fluence the activities of the uni-
versity guest program. "North
Carolina recently passed a bill
which prohibited a communist or
a person with communist tenden-
cies from speaking on campus.
They have had difficulty because
any person can have communist

Fiscal Poll
By KAREN KENAH
A second group of letters has
recently been sent out in order to
complete the SGC sponsored sur-
vey of student finances and inter-
est in the trimester.
About 52 per cent of the forms
have been returned from the first
mailing, said Tom Brown, '66L.
However, for the survey to be
valid at least a 65 per cent return
is necessary.
Second copies of the survey have
been sent out to o,e-half of the

Across
Campus
An exhibition entitled "Italy
Through Dutch Eyes: Dutch 17th
Century Landscape Artists in
Italy" will be on display today
through May 24 at the University
Museum of Art in Alumni Memor-
ial Hall.

DA ILY OFF ICIA L BU L LET I N
.x"...,,h. .....@. ........ .."...::......... .o }"'o:.": :"".4i ..": ..... .... ..... M..:r::.:-v..4. . h"

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be sent
in TYPEWRITTEN fcm to Room
36j4 Administration Building before
2 p.m. of the day preceding publica-
tion, and by 2 p.m. Friday for Satur-
day and Sunday.

Commencement Instructions to Facul- this meeting must be in the President's
ty Members: Convene at 9:15 a.m. in the hands not latei than May 7.
first floor lobby in the Administration
Bldg. Buses will be provided in front ! The Office of Student Affairs an-
of the Administration Bldg. on State nounces rue following hours for wom-
Street to take you to the Stadium or en: 1:30, April 24; :00, April 25,
Yost Field house to join the proces-
sion and to take the place assigned USPHIS Pr'edoctoral Fellows are re-
to youn on stage, as directed by the minded >6t teir scheduled meetings
Marshals; at the end o fthe exercises with Dr. Stephen Hatcnett on April 23
buses will be ready in driveway east cf and 24.

sJxanwr cr AV A"DTl Ali]

1
s
c

leanings.

Last year a virus spread among In response to a question, Prof.
the horses and our virologists Albright noted that individuals in
were diverted into examining this the social sciences take public
new virus in line with the uni- stands on the more important
versity program. The livestock I political issues.

students who did not return their

original questionnaire. At leastf
200 of these letters must be re-
turned. A form could not be sent
out to each person who originally
received one because there were
not enough materials, Brown said.
Beacuse only one-half of the
people will be polled, each form
which is returned from the second
mailing will be considered as if
it were the reply of two people.,
Brown noted that such action is;
necessary to make the survey a
true evaluation of the situation.
Brown added that one of the
problems encountered has been
with students who do not work
during the school year. They have
misinterpreted the survey think-
ing it was concerned only with
those students who do work.
The survey, sent our originally
before spring vacation, asks about
three areas of student concern:
method of financing education,
employment during the school
year and interest in the trimester.
Indications so far are that stu-
dents are more interested in a
future trimester than in one for
next year and that over one-third
of the students work. Beyond these
conclusions, results are still un-
Icertain.

II

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22 the stadium or at west side of Yost
Phosphorus . . . Field House to bring you back to the The Henry Russel Lecture will be de-
Po.FH.RgeofteUie-campus. livered by William Randolph Taylor,
P . H g t U -Prof, of Botany and Curator of Algae in
sity of Toronto will speak on ? Student AccoInts: Your attention is the Univ. Herbarium, Thurs., April 23,
"Phosphorus Fractions and Turn- Basic Firemanship Conference-Civil called to the fol'wing rules passed by at 4:15 p in., in the Rackham Amphithe-
over Time of Inorganic Phosphor- Defense and Disaster Training Center, the Regents at their meeting on Feb, atre. His lecturetopic is Plants of the
us in Different Types of Lake" at 8:30 a.m.28196"Suetshlpaalac
pm tod rn 1400 Ch e Bldg. Municipal Purchasing Officers Con- counts due the University not later will be made at this time.
ference-Registration, Mich. Union, 9 than the last day of classes of each
ar.semester or summer sessiion. Stuident Exhibition: The exhibition "Italy
a.m.rmse o umrses,.su through D utch Eyes: Dutch Seven
Dept. of Industrial Engineering and loans which are not paid or renewed truhDthEe:DthSvn
Poerty . . . DProgram in Hospital Administration Lee- are subject to this regulation: however. teenth Century Landscape Artists in
Prof. Robert Lampman of the ture-Willsam R. Brown, management student loans not yet due are exempt. Italy" wilt open today and be on view
i rsi. of Wimonsn wl spe consultant, A. T. Kearney Co., Chi- Any unpaid accounts at the eise of tniough May 24 at the U-M Museum of
University of Wisconsin will speak cago, "Engineering Measurement in business on the last day of classes will Art.
on "Projects and Policies for Re- NursingS ervice": Room 311, W. Engrg, bereported to the Cashier of the Uni-
ducing Poverty" at 8 p.m. today Bldg., 3 p.m. vriyandAnocigUnvPlyrPabl,
in the Union Ballroom. Dept. of Speech Assembly-Speakers "(a) Allar academic credits will be oSummer.'.a auspices of Department
Lnathen is Ba fromerm.e from Speech iOO classes: Rackhant Lec- withheld, the grades for the semester o pee
Lampman is a former member ture Hall, 4 p.m. or summer session just completed will June 24-27-Lerner and Loewe's "My
of the President's Council of Doctoral Examination for Ellis An- not be released, and no transcript of Fair Lady" featuring Prof, Ralph Her-
Economic Advisors. drews Wunsch, English Language & Lit- credits will be issued. bert of the School of Music and Bari-
erature; thesis; "Stephen Spender: Crit- "(b) All students owing such accounts tone with Metropolitan Opera Company
ic of Modern Literature," 2601 Haven will not be allowed to register in any as Henry Higgens.
Henry V Hall, at 3 p.m. Chairman, H. C. Barrows. subsequent semester or summer session July 8-11-Tennessee Williams' "Sum-
Doctoral Examination for Philip Ger-. .ntil payment has been made." mer and Smnoke. ' >n
The University Players will p'- ld Kessel. Engineering Mechanics; thes- -- July 15-1R-Sam Spewack's enchant-
sent Shakespeare's chronicle play, is: "Dynamically Loaded Journal Bear- Regents' Meeting: Thurs., May 21. ing fable "Under the Sycamore Tree."
"Henry V" at 8 p.m. today in ings of Finite Length with Axial Feed," Communications for consideration at (Continued on Page 5)
u124 W. Engrg. Bldg., at 3:30 p.m. Chair- _~_~_-_~_~
Trueblood Aud. man, Jesse Ormondroyd.
Doctoral Examination for Peter Par- HELD OVER
Forum . . askevoudakis, Environmental Health; 6TH WEEK!
Forum ~~~~~~~thesis: "Wavelength - Dependence of' 2 i. 5 eka oine-S 0
The music school will present a Horseradish Peroxidase Inactivation by Weekday Matinees--$00
composers forum at 8:30 p.m. to- Soft X-Rays," 105 SPH, at 1:30 p.m. Dial 2-6264 Evenings & Sunday-$1.25
day n Au. A.Chairman, G. H. Whipple.
day in Aud. A. himn .H pl. SHOWS STAR T AT 1:30-4:00-6:30 & 9:00
Doctoral Examination for Raymond
Peter Petehson, Education; thesis: "A FEATURE 15 MINUTES LATER
Horn Ensemble . . . Compvarison ofthe Reading and Spell-
Horn nsembe ~ 'ing Achievement of Groups of English A
The music school's Horn En- and American Children," 4017 UHS, at 4
semble will be heard at 8:30 p.m. 10 a.m. Chairman, I. H. Anderson.n d
today in Hill Aud. Doctoral Examination for Labib Zu-
wiyya-Yamak, Political Science; thesis: . Best Picture
The Ideological Foundations, Structure and
S , ho . .and Organization of the Syrian Social
*Nationalist Party," 4609 Haven Hall, at Best Director
Soph Show '64 will hold a m Ss 7:30 p.m. Chairman, G. A. Grassmuck.
meeting to discuss the fali show at Doctoral Examination for Fred Camp-
7:15 p.m. today in the Michigan bell McCormick, Civil Engrg.; thesis: 'tA
Romo h ihgnLau.Rational Procedure for Proportioning ; II AAf~~FSTfTuit ~T5" -g.oster C~er.h,~
Sicig ea Pre-Formed Foam Cellular Concrete "A R ARNG ENTERTAINMENT!"~'''' .'
Mixes," 333 W, Engrg. Bldg., at 2 p.m. "T BEST COMEDY EVER MADE.- .AN ABSO-
Chairman, L. M. Legatski.

'

'7

-Daily-Sam Haberman
PROF. ARNOLD D. ALBRIGHT discussed the relationship be-
tween politics and higher education in the South. He pointed out
that conflicts between the two occur in areas of research, racial
problems, athletics and livestock breeding.

Ending
Thursday
Dial 5-6290

...amef

r- --.--- - .

KTJ!j[IiT[CVV~

Shows at
1, 3, 5,
7 Ond 9:05 P.M.

Moving Out
"The Alabama game would be
played at Lexington and the Mis-
sissippi game would be played at
Memphis where segregation is no
issue. These arrangements would
be made largely at the efforts of
legislators."
Livestock breeding, being an
important interest in Kentucky,
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Alpha Phi Omega, Chapter meeting,
April 22, 7 p.m., Room 3B, Michigan Un-
ion -
Baptist Student Union, Spring Re-
treat Emphasis: a discussion of and
plauning for the statewide B.S.U. Spring
Retreat at Bambi Lake, Mich., Wed.,
April 22, 7:30 p.m., Room 528D, SAB.
Cervantes Club, Latin American folk
singing with folk singers from Uruguay,
April 23, 8 p.m., Michigan Union.
La Sociedad Hispanica, Reunion, Wed.
April 22, 8 p.m., Los Hermanos Cas
tro-Uruguayan Singers and Dancers.,
Room 3050 Frieze Bldg.
* s *
Le Cerle Francais, Le Baratin, le 23
Avril, s-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
* s *
Michigras, Michigras Ticket Pre-Sale,
Thurs., April 24, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Diag
and Union steps.
University Lutheran Chapel, Midweek
Devotion, conducted by Vicar John
Koenig, April 22, 10 p.m., 1511 Washte-
naw.
- .. ,.
Young Republicans, last meeting of
the semester, April 23, 8 p.m., 38, Mich-
igan Union. Agenda: To organize the
,club for the summer. Speakers: City
and county representatives.
Alpha Phi Omega, Pledge class meet-
ing, April 23, 4 p.m., 3516 SAB.
Christian Science organization, Tes-
timony meeting, April 23, 7:30 p.m.,
Room 528D, SAB.
Voice, Folk concert with Danny Kalb
d Sam Charters, April 23, 8 p.m., Aud,
, Angell Hall.
DIAL 8-6416
ENDING TONIGHT

Anatomy Seminar - Dr. James N.
Spuhier, Dept. of Anthropology, The U-I
M, "Evolution of the Hominid Brain" :
at 4 p.m., 2501 E. Medical Bldg.
General Notices
Phi Beta Kappa: Initiation Banquet,
Thurs., April 23, Mich. Union, 7 p.m.
Dean William N. Hubbard of the Medi-
cal School will be the speaker. Reser-
vations should be made at the office of
the secretary, Hazel M. Losh (Ext. 659).
--

LUTE TRIUMPH!" -Nwswe.o
"BRILLIANTLY ENTERTAINING. IT LEAVES AN
AUDIENCE STUNNED WITH JOY' " "ord''''si
"* ***(HIGHEST RATING!) DELECTABLE."
-K~oe Cn,toa. N.Y. DoityNewe
"ABSOLUTELY MAGNIFICENT!" --Tim egaozim
EASTMANCOLOR -Aw ADULT ENTERTAINMENT

I

OPENING TONIGHT

U-M PLAYERS

I

Department of Speech
presents
8:00P.M.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
performances thru Saturday
$1.00, $1.50
(25c additional for Fri. & Sat,)
Box Office open 12:30-8:00 daily
and announcing
PLAYBILL"
SUMMER '41

June 24-27:

Lerner and Loewe's

MY FAIR LADY
with Prof. Ralph Herbert of the Metropolitan Opera

ACADEMY
AWARD
WINNER!
B EST
FIL

July 8-11
July 15-18:

Tennessee Williams'
SUMME R AND SMOKE
Sam Spewack's

UNDER THE SYCAMORE TREE

I

r STARTING THURSDAY ,
MIAURICE
EVANS
JUDITH
ANDERSON

July 29-Augus
August 5-8:

t 1

James Thurber's

A THURBER CARNIVAL
Opera Dept., School of Music

AN OPE RA to be selected
(Probably FRA DIAVOLD by Daniel Auber)

I

i

,i

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