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April 17, 1964 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

_ THE MICIIIGAN DAILY F

RIDAY, AP]

f

OLICY STUDY:
SGC Investigates
Insurance, Parking

Cites 'Quixote' as First Modern Novel

By KAREN KENAH
Student Government Council
heard from Ed Heiser, the health
insurance. coordinator and from
Gary Cunningham, '66, on parking
and driving regulations Wednes-
day night.
Heiser reported the results of a
study made on the current student
health.insurance policy. The pur-.
pose of the study was to discover
the reasons for fluctuation in poli-
cy rates and to explore the possi-
bilities of price changes in the fu-
ture.
Since the insurance program was
first put into effect at the Univer-
sity in 1951, the price of individ-
ual policies has risen fairly reg-
ularly each .year with the excep-
tion of one reduction in 1962.
Continued Rise
The investigatingscommittee
concluded that the hike in policy
costs was necessary because of
the rising cost of medical care,
and will unavoidably continue to
rise in subsequent years.
The committee came to the con-
clusion that the rise was general
and not caused by unusually heavy
expenses in one area of medical
care..-
Heiser said there have been no
complaints either on the amount
of coverage provided by the pres-
ent policy or the service given by
the company. He concluded by rec-
ommending that SGC retain the
services of the American Casualty
Company for the coming year.
Parking Committee
Cunningham reported on a re-
cent meeting of. the Driving and
Parking Committee, which governs
regulations concerning student
driving privileges. The, group is
composed of Dean Bingley, direc-
tor of student activities and or-
ganizations, a person appointed by
joint judiciary, the administra-
tive vice-president and treasurer
of SOC.
The committee discussed the
possibility of lowering the costof
E-stickers and of finding addi-
tional parking space for students.
The cost of E-stickers has been
kept high in hopes of collecting'
enough money to build a student

parking structure, Cunningham
said. However, funds are not ac-
cumulating fast enough to make
that method of raising them prac-
tical.
Lease Space
The committee hopes to lease
a floor of the faculty structure to
alleviate the problem of student
parking. The space in Ann Arbor
that has been used for parking
until now is to make way for new
buildings next year.
Bingley suggested the age lim-
it on driving be abolished and
let students make their own ar-
rangements.

By ANN HARRIS
Cervantes was the "first modern
novelist and the book 'Don Qui-
xote' was the first modern novel."
So asserted Prof. Stephen Gil-
man of Harvard University in a
lecture here yesterday. He ex-
plained that the proof rests on
the acceptance of the present
definition of a novel.
"It must be a literary work of
aesthetic, historical, and authora-
tive implications which uses an
inventive combination of words
and presents a novelistic approach
to life," he said.
Literary Invention
Prof. Gilman differentiated be-
tween "original creation and in-
vention." He claimed that "Don
Quixote" is a literary invention
in that it uniquely combines fic-
tion and verisimilitude and em-
ploys a loose "technical freedom"
which Was not present in other

PROF. STEPHEN GILMAN

ACROSS CAMPUS:
Nuclear Group Holds Meeting

hovels of his period. This freedom
is. both external in content and
internal in the integration of var-
ious classical forms.
This loose plan enabled Cer-
vantes to combine the tragic,
comic, epic and lyric literary
forms. The comic and tragic qual-
ities of the novel provide an al-
ternation of light and serious med-
iation, Prof. Gilman asserted. The
lyrical aspect permits the mastery
of dramatic characterization by
allowing each character to reveal
himself, he said.
"Don Quixote" is the first novel
of romance in Spain. Various
other forms of the light novel
were present in this period, but
Cervantes felt that a more literary
novel was needed; he accepted the
responsibility of providing liter-
ary reform.
Contribution
Cervantes claimed that contem-
porary literature contributed to
the host of imitations which made
no effort to improve upon the
present novel. Prof. Gilman said
Cervantes attacks this in "Scrut-
iny of the Books" located in the
first part of "Don Quixote." This
portion was "simply a manifesto
of his further intentions."
Prof. Gilman also noted that in
order to understand Cervantes'
claim, we must understand the
period in which he lived. Spain's
transition in the 16th century
from medieval tradition to nation-
alism initiated literature as a na-
tional phenomenon. Thus Cer-
vantes' task was to perfect pres-
ent forms and to add a new level
of meaning to the word "novel."
Reciprocal Relation
Cervantes not only completed
his task but also proved there
must exist a two-way relationship
between author and reader.
Prof. Gilman questioned wheth-
er Cervantes was conscious of his
accomplishment. There is a por-
tion in the second part of "Don
Quixote" which gives evidence
Cervantes was aware, of his suc-
cess. However, Prof. Gilman ex-
pressed Cervantes' burlesque com-
ment that, "at best, 'Don Quixote'
would be a future textbook."

Leadership
Prize Goes
To Executive
ANN ARBOR-Donald C. Cook,
president of American Electric
Power Co. and former chairman of
the Securities and Exchange Com-
mission, will receive the University
of Michigan's 1964 Business Lead-
ership Award, the University said
yesterday. Cook, a native of Es-
canaba and a University alumnus,
will receive the annual award on
April 17.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be sent
in TYPEWRITTEN form to Room
3654 Administration Building before
2 p.m. of the day preceding publica-
tion, and by 2 p.m. Friday for Satur-
day and Sunday,
FRIDAY, APRIL 17
Day Calendar
Doctoral Examination for Jerry Alan
winter, Social Psychology; thesis: "Cog-
nitive Balance, Strategic-Balance and
Discomfort in a Competitive Situa-
tion," 7615 Haven Hall, at 2 p.m. Chair-
man, Dorwin Cartwright.
Doctoral Examination for Aron Taylor
Adams, Electricals Engrg.; thesis: "The
Rectangular Cavity Slot Antenna with
Honogeneous Isotropic Loading,"148 E.
Engrg. Bldg., at 3 p.m. Chairman, J. A.
M. Lyon.
Doctoral Examination for Tsung Yen
Na, Mechanical Engrg.; thesis: t'The
Influence of Localized, Normal Surface
Oscillations on the tSeady, Laminar
Flow over a Flat Plate," 2026 Fluids
Lab., at 4 p.m.
Doctoral Examination for Vernon
Lodge Larrowe, Electrical Engrg.; thesis:
"Analog Computer Measurement of
Time-Varying Power Spectra," 2310 E.
Engrg. Bldg., at 2 p.m. Chairman, A. B.
Macnee.
Doctoral Examination for Richard
Henry Howland, Education; thesis: "A
Study of Strong Vocational Interest
Test Scores as Related to Academic
Achievement and Continued Interest

The American Nuclear Society
will hold its second annual Mid-
west Student Conference today
and Satui'day at the University.
Prof. William Kerr, chairman
of the. nuclear engineering de-
partment will keynote today's con-
ference. Technical presentations
will be given by C. D. Taulbee of
Bendix. Corporation; F. Jamerson
of General Motors; Prof. Paul F.
Zweifel of the nuclear engineer-
ing department and C. E. Branyan
of the Atomic Development Asso-
ciation.
Saturday's session will consist of
the reading of 24 student research
and study papers. The day will be
closed by a tour of the Fermi Fast
Reactor in Monroe.
Degree Recital.. .
Emily Brink, organist, will pre-
sent a School of Music degree re-
cital at 8:30 p.m. today in Hill
Aud.
Industrial Seminar ....
The Bureau of Industrial. Re-
lations Seminar will be held at
8:30 a.m. today in the'Third Floor
Conference Rrn. of the Union. The
topic will be "Management by Ob-

jectives - Results-Oriented Ap-
praisals Systems."
Japanese Studies ...
Donald L. Keene, Prof. of Japa-
nese at Columbia University will
speak on "Poetry in the Japanese
Drama" at 4:15 p.m. today in
Rackham Aud.
Music Recital.. .
Piano majors will hold a recital
at 4:15 p.m. today in. Lane Hall
Aud.
Film Festival...
The Second Ann Arbor Film Fes-
tival will hold its showings at 7
p.m. and 9 p.m. today, tomorrow
and Sunday.
The series of films are "intend-
ed to stimulate rather than mere-
ly to entertain." The films are sig-
nificant attempts at new ap-
proaches to film making. Several
films are being shown by award-
winner George Vanderbeek r
Each showing contains a differ-
ent series of films so there will be
no repetition.
Visitors' Night ...
Guenther H. E. Elste will speak
on "The Boiling Solar Atmos-
phere" at 8:30 p.m. today in 2003
Angell Hall.
Civic Theatre.. .
The 'Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
will present "Ronamoff & Juliet"
today and tomorrow in Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre. Tickets, for the
Saturday matinee are still avail-
able from Box 87 or from Jerry
Scofield, ticket manager, at 1306
Prescott.
Student Luncheon...
The newest in a series of stu-
dent-faculty luncheons as a part
of the Union's Profile on Labor
series will be held from noon to 1
p.m. on April 23. Students inter-
ested in discussing Prof. Lang-

man's speech, "Prospects and Pol-
icies for Reducing Poverty" with
University professors should sign
up at the Union main desk today.
The limit is 255 students.
Greek Dri ve...
The Interfraternity Council and
Junior Panhellenic Association will
hold their American Cancer Fund
Drive today.
The drive will bring to a close
Cancer Crusade Week in Ann Ar-
bor. This year, 230 affiliated men
and women will solicit funds at 14
different locations throughout the
campus and Main Street between
9 a.m. and 4 p.m.
Home Care Conference.
The public health school will
present its Organized Home Cahe
Conference at 9 a.m. today at the
school.

in Pharmacy for Four Freshman Phar-
macy Groups for the School Years
1958-59 and 1959-60," 4019A iYHS, at
3 p.m. Co-Chairmen, F. W. Dalton and
C. R. Hutchcroft.
Doctoral Examination for Lester Ron-
ald DeKoster, Lib. Science; thesis: "Liv-
ing Themes in the Thought of John
Calvin. A Bibliographical Study," 10
General Lib., at 3 p.m. Chairman, R.
L. Kilgour.
(Continued on Page 8)
Dial 2-6264
WINNER OF 4
ACADEMY AWARDS!
including
BEST PICTURE
and
BEST DIRECTOR
"BEST COMEDY,
EVER MADB!
S Newsw
6: 0l l9 00
Feature is 15 minutes later
Weekday matinees. $100
Evenings and Sunday .. . 1.25

{'

_,
E

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DONALD C. COOK

""

'

DIAL 8-6416

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Shows at 7 and 9 P.M.

ra

IM

STUDENTS and FACULTY

Dial 662-8871 for

U

"

Gine P t ainQ
Program Information

PROGRAM
APRIL 17, 7:00 P.M.
FISH MARKET by Michael Eisler
TOTEM by Ed Emshwiler
IT'S HARRY FINK AND APPLEBAUM
AND WEISS by Harold Crowley
A LA MODE by Stan Vanderbeek
MY MAY by George Manupelli

DINING EXCELLENCE AT

I

Golden Tree Room

Town and Country Room

HELD
OVJJER !

(Z MrHIG.

Shows at
1,3,5,
7 and 9:05 P.M.

Main Dining Room

Featuring

I

Brilliant Picture
Not To Be Missed"
"Dr. Stangelove" is a brilliant daring comedy, and the most refreshing
and exciting American film-of this decade. It will entertain as well as
annoy, delight as well as anger, please as well as frustrate. You must see
"Dr. Stangelove."
-Hugh Holland, Michigan Daily
A SUPERSONIC THRILLERI"-TIME
"Brn1 iant "-Lu-E "A direct hit".NEWSWEEK

MAINE LIVE LOBSTERS

and

CHAMPAGNE COCKTAILS

I

APRIL 17,9:00 P.M.
OLEAN by Charles Swedlund
WAITING SERVANT by Robert Rose
BY THE SEA by Robert Abel and
Pat O'Neill
THREE DANCES by
Eugene L. Friedman
RIVER by Pyramid Film Producers
MANOVANE RIVER LUMBERJACKS
by Arthur Lamothe
21-87 by Arthur Lipsett
THE IMAGE IN TIME by
George Manupelli
DISSENT ILLUSION by Millie Goldshol
URSULA by Lloyd Michael Williams
AN INTERIOR by Abbott Meader
SCRAMBLES by Ed Emshwiller
MASS by Bruce Baillie
APRIL 18, 9:00 P.M.
CONCERTO FLAMENCO by
Maurice Amar
LEMON HEARTS by
Vernon Zimmerman
PEERS by Peter Dart
BREATH-DEATH by Stan Vanderbeek
FIVE SHORT FILMS by
George Manupelli
TO PARSIFAL by Bruce Baillie
FIRST TIME HERE by Richard Myers
APRIL 19, 7:0,0 P.M.
BEARDED SNOW by Byron Goto
WHAT DO YOU DO HERE by
Gordon Townsend
PUPPET'S DREAM by Pyramid
Film Producers
SCARFACE AND APHRODITE by
Vernon Zimmerman
SHOOT THE MOON by Red Grooms
and Rudolph Burkhardt
SCORPIO RISING by Kenneth Anger
APRIL 19, 9:00 P.M.
Late Arrivals
Announcement and Repeat Showings of
The Award Winning Films
Special Events

Mon. thru Thurs. Fri. and Sat. Sunday
11:30 a.m.-1 1 p.m. 11:30 a.m.-I a.m. Noon - 8:30 p.m.
JACKSON ROAD AT THE 1-94 AND M-14 EXIT

I

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.

Ann Arbor's Jazz Event of the Year!
CONCERT in JAZZ

I

Why did U.S. H-Bombers attack Russia?

I

* Where was the Red Premier
[ when the hot-line rang?

I

ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

I SINGLE ADMISSION

50 CENTS

,I

U of M JAZZ BAND
directed by Bruce Fisher
CLARENCE BYRD TRIO

I

Why did Dr. Strangelove want ten women for each man? * Why did U.S. Paratroopers invade their own base?

SPECIAL
8MM FILM FESTIVAL
T Kifl'L- ,KII V DrrIC AT A I r '=IiLT

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A

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from The Waterfall ClubI

S I

'b r~ ~ r ~l r 1 flh iniiuOihIskI nh I Crd'hej.& .. '"'s

s I

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