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April 08, 1964 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-08

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY,,APRIL S, 1964

PAGE TWO TUE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8,1964

y
_.>. t

COLORADO:
Ostracizes Goldwater Boosters

Weber Notes New Uses
Of Engineering Talent

OPERA SINGER:
Anna Moffo: An Actress, Too

Collegiate Press Service
BOULDER-The recently form-
ed Students for Goldwater group
at the University of Colorado was
denied university recognition by,
the Committee on Student Organ-
izations and Social Life.
The group withheld recognition
on the grounds that the club is "a
temporary partisan organization
designed to promote one candi-
date for national office."
According' to Alice Cox, ex-
officio member of the joint stu-
dent-faculty board, the action is
based on a section of the Adopted
Policy Concerning the Use of Uni-
versity Facilities, passed by the
Board of Regents in 1955. The

policy states that
Colorado facilities
partisan use.

University of
are not for

Club 'Differs'
Miss Cox said Students for
Goldwater differs from recognized
organizations such as the Young
Democrats and the Young - Re-
publicans. "These groups are af-
filiated with national organiza-
tions, and their purpose is to edu-
cate young people in making a
wise political choice.
"The group in question, on the
other hand, is promoting a single
candidate. If he loses in the pri-
mary, the club will fold complete-
ly."
Mark Sullivan, president of the
Students -for Goldwater, said that
his club has not yet made any
definite plans concerning the re-
cent decision. Sullivan said the
club's alternatives are to become
an off-campus organization, or to

affiliate with the Young Repub-
licans as a sub-group.
Y-R Affiliation?
"It doesn't make much sense to
me," he said. "If we affiliate with
the YR's We will be doing the same
thing. Why can't we just go ahead
anyway?"
Miss Cox said that SOSL con-
siders the Students for Goldwater
a function of the Young Repub-
licans, instead of an independent
group.
Sullivan said his organization
is aware of a third possibility of
gaining recognition by appealing
directly to the president of the
university or the Board of Re-
gents, but that he "doubts if the
club will consider taking this ac-
tion."
The Students for Goldwater has
had several organization meetings
on campus-all of which have
l been sparsely attended.

By CHRISTINE LINDER
"Engineers have a responsibilityI
to exercise leadership in integrat-
ing their scientific knowledge into
the * rest of their society," Prof.1
Ernst Weber, president of the
Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn,.
said yesterday at the Third An-
nual Engineering College Honors
Convocation.
Speaking on the topic, "The En-
gineer's Responsibility to Society,"
Prof. Weber said that engineers
are only beginning to use their
specialized knowledge to help the
West handle the ramifications of
its advanced technology.
Engineers need to complete their'
transition to the status of a pro-
fession, assuming the responsibil-
ity for broader training of engi-
neering students in the humani-
ties and applied problems in the
behavioral sciences, Prof. Weber
noted.
Great Service
"T h e engineering profession
can, for example, be of great serv-
ice to the government." Since
basic technological problems are
often enemeshed in a social or bio-
logical background, greater con-
sciousness of the social responsi-
bilities involved in making tech-
nical decisions is needed, he said.
Prof. Weber pointed out that
already the biological and social
sciences owe many of their tools
to engineers.
Pointing to the evolution of en-
gineering, Prof. Weber noted that
the term "engine" was first used
in connection with engines of war.
"Only gradually did the broader

concept of application to non-
military problems emerge.
"Present Western technology,
which produces a great gap be-
tween: Western countries and the
rest of the world, is the result of
400 years of the evolution of
science, starting with the birth of
Galileo, exactly 400 years ago,"
Prof. Weber said.

By ALAN Z. SHULMAN
While I was waiting backstage
last Friday night to interview
Anna Moffo, who had just come
off the stage, what seemed like
several hundred autograph-seek-
ers and well-wishers filed in and
out of the Hill Auditorium recep-
tion room to see this same woman
who in five years has become one

Court Allows Professors
Deductions for Research

Trend-Setting' Sessions
End 'Lean Budget Years'

By Intercollegiate Press
CLAREMONT, Calif.-At long
last the professor is getting a
break with income tax deductions.
After a seven-year court battle,
discrimination against college and
university professors, who have
not been permitted to deduct or-
dinary and necessary expenses in
connection with scholarly research
ended recently with a ruling of the
Commissioner of Internal Revenue.
1957, on behalf of the taxpayer,
The tax return was prepared in
by Prof. George Gibbs, C.P.A., in
practice in Claremont, Calif. Gibbs
is also an instructor at Claremont
Men's College.
Harold H. Davis, retired profes-
sor of English literature at Po-
Mona College, obtained the ruling
and stipulation reversing the de-
cision of the United States Tax
Court which had decided against
him (8 to 6), on April 30, 1962.

The main issue was the deduc-
tibility of the expenses of a trip
in 1956 to England where he did
research consisting of reading
unique works in several libraries
while gathering data on the Ren-
aissance Period 1475-1640.
The government contended that
because he had tenure he was not
required to do this research
abroad nor was . it "ordinary and
necessary" toward maintaining his
status as professor and teacher.
The second issue was the de-
ductibility of depreciation and
utilities for the professor's study
which had been built especially
for his research work.
Mr. Gibbs carried the case
through three levels when dis-
allowed by the Internal Revenue'
auditor, by the informal conferee'
and by the appellate division. In
the Tax Court, the case lost by a
narrow margin.

of the outstanding performers in
every major opera house in the
world.
I say performer rather than
singer because Miss Moffo is more
than just a singer. That she is
also a fine actress can be attested
to by those who have seen her in
an operatic role.
She herself admits that there
is more to one of her perform-
ances than mere vocal - skill. "I
approach all operatic roles first
as if there is no music," Miss
Moffo said. "Only after I t have
understood the character I am
playing can I sing the part."
Straight Acting
Besides knowing how to act
with her voice, Miss Moffo con-
fesses she is "very keen on the
idea of straight acting." Already
she has agreed to appear in a
second movie, the first being
"Austerlitz" in which she played
Napoleon's operatic mistress, Giu-
seppina Grazzini.
Not all of Miss Moffo's interests
have been operatic or dramatic.
In high school she displayed an
exceptional ability in sports, in-
cluding an excellent basketball
hook shot and a booming tennis
serve. It is said that she could
have been a champion at the lat-
ter sport. "Now that I have re-
cording contracts and my own TV
show in Italy, I don't get much
chance to play tennis except in
the summer," she says.
A Pennsylvaniai .

Detroit Council
Ra s Rightists,
Drops Charges,
Collegiate Press Service
DETROIT-The Student Coun-
cil of the University of Detroit
dropped motions to impeach two
of its members at a recent meet-
ing.
Following the advice of the Stu-
dent Government Committee, the
council dismissed charges against
engineering representative Jim
Broad and arts representative
Gene Schulte.
At an earlier meeting Schulte
had charged Broad, an admitted
member of the John Birch-Society
with membership in a "totalitarian
organization in violation of the
University Credo."
(The Birch Society is a right-
wing organization which has de-
manded United States withdrawal
from the United Nations and the
impeachment of Chief Justice Earl
Warren.)
Schulte, a Democrat, was in
turn charged by freshman repre-
sentative Dick Schmidt with using
his position on council to em-
barrass his political opponent.
The government committee,
after a four hour hearing, report-
ed that it "found no public, docu-
mented proof that Mr. James
Broad, as a member of the Birch1
Society advocates a totalitarian
form of government or one that
is undemocratic or immoral."
The committee did not give any
specific reasons for its recom-
mendation for dropping charges
against Schulte.
The question was also raised as
to whether or not recommenda-
tions for dropping the charges
against Broad and Schulte were
inconsistent with each other.
Broad had attempted to get the
report amended for a more favor-
able treatment of the Birch So-
ciety, but failed.

''t

(Continued from Page 1)
Yesterday's Senate Appropria-
tions Committee action marked
the first step towards a "historic
and trend-setting appropriation"
as officials termed it.
Although the University orig-
inally requested $47.6 million, ad-
ministrative spokesmen have pri-
vately expressed "strong satisfac-
tion" with the governor's recom-
mendation. They - point to this
operation sum for fiscal 1964-65
as an end to "the lean budget
years.",
In the past seven appropriation
packages, the University sum in-
creased only a total of $8 from its
1956 level. In 1958 the appropria-
tion from the previous year was
cut back by $200,000 from a 1957
level of $30.2 million.
Even earlier this year key legis-
lators were reported in a slashing
mood. One of these, Senate Ap-,
propriations Committee chairman
Frank Beadle (R-St. Clair) had
disclosed that a majority of his
committee favored tuition hikes to
supplement state funds.
If the $6 million boost of the
University is passed in both
houses, officials have promised to
moved the University into full-
scale trimester operations, but the
bill may still face a stern test from
H o u s e conservatives, Lansing
sources said last night.
However, they indicated that
the appropriation committee hur-
dle was the greatest barrier. The
operations bill-as well as the
capital outlay measure--will come
Receives Rights
For 'Fair Lady
The University Players have
received the production rights to
perform Alan Jay Lerner and
Frederick Loewe's "My Fair Lady"
as a part of their 1964 Summer
Playbill, it was announced today.
Featured in the production will
be Prof. Ralph Herbert of the
Music School and the Metropoli-
tan Opera Company, who will
appear in the role of Henry Hig-
gens.
Auditions for the principal roles
and chorus in this production will
be open. to all students. They will
be held at 2 p.m. on Saturday,
April 11, and Sunday, April 12, in
the dance studio of Barbour gym-
nasium.

before the Senate in a few days.
It will be on its way to the
House untouched within 10 days,
sources said.
Affiliates Mull
'U' Connections
(Continued from Page 1)
allow them to do so. I think the
University must be active in this
area."
Miss Wickins said that "the ex-
ternal pressure of the University
has been a major factor in spur-
ring sororities to examine the
status quo. I frankly wonder if
we could solve our problems with-
out the University."
Sorenson promised the two pres-
idents that he would take no fur-
ther action until after they had
spoken with their respective
groups.

i

SGC

Ad-Hoc Group.Surveys Jobs

Miss Moffo was born in Wayne,
Pa. A Fulbright scholarship sent
her to Italy where she met her
husband, Mario Lanfranchi, while
auditioning for a television pro-
duction of "Madame Butterfly" of
which he was the director.
Today, the Lanfranchis live in
an apartment in Rome which
overlooks the forum, and a 15th
Century villa near Parma where
they raise thoroughbred trotters.
On this trip to the United States,'
Miss Moffo and her husband
brought two of the Hanover horses
with them. "We love horses," she
said. "I've even driven one of the
sulkies, and it's really exciting."

ANNA MOFFO
Build Stream
For Research
Scientists have built a minia-
ture river in a laboratory at the
University public health school to
study one of the vexing mysteries
of bacterial growth.
Although only 15 feet long, the
river ca4 simulate a variety of
natural conditions.
Researchers can imitate fallen
trees, logs and other natural ob-
structions, and can reproduce con-
ditions of drought or: heavy run-
off.
The purpose of the elaborate
affair is to investigate an unusual
bacteria called Sphaerotilus na-
tans. which, under a microscope,
looks like a string of short bars.
In its natural state, it creates
slime formations which rot the
nets of commercial fishermen, re-
duce the fish population, and de-
stroy the recreational value and
natural beauty of streams and
rivers in many parts of the na-
tion.

st

By THOMAS COPI
Plans for action by Student
Government C o u n c i l's ad-hoc
committee studying the possibility
of creating, a students' employ-
ment union at the University were
disclosed yesterday by the com-
mittee's chairman, Barry Blue-
stone, '66.

He said that the group is try-
ing to find out where students are
employed in and out of the Uni-
versity, adding that "in the Uni-
versity" employment includes jobs
in fraternities, sororities, dormi-
tories and in University depart-
ments.
Questionnaires going to off-
campus employers, include ques-
tions in such areas as job offer-
ings and wage scales.
An SGC financial survey, being
carried out by Tom Brown, '67L,
will also be used as part of -the
committee's inquiry. The survey,

Across .Campus

lates to their status in the Uni-
versity.
Bluestone mentioned that the
group will also talk to Vice-Presi-
dent for Student Affairs James A.
Lewis, Vice-President for Busi-
ness and Finances Wilbur K. Pier-
pont, the University's part-time
employment bureau, the Michigan
Employment Security Commission
and the Ann Arbor Chamber of
Commerce.
He also said that although no
questionnaire for students is plan-
ned in addition to the financial
survey, the committee may hold
"some sort of student employes
assembly" to hear what the stu-
dents have to say about the pos-
sibility of a student employes un-
ion.
The group's preliminary report
is to be given to SGC on April 29.

STUDENTS and FACULTY

i
R

Dial 662-8871 for

Prof. Elton B. McNeil of the
psychology department will be the
keynote speaker at the Student
Counselling Services Colloquium at
8 p.m. today in Trueblood Aud.
He will speak on "Is Counselling
A Rat-Fink Operation?"
'Mystique' . " .
Betty Friedan, author of "The
Meminine Mystique;" will speak on
"The American Male and the
Feminine Mystique," at 4:10 p.m.
today in Rackham Aud.
Communicators .. .
Prof. John Tebbel of New York
University will speak on "What
are the Communicators Communi-
cating?" at 3 p.m. today in the.
Multipurpose Rm. of the UGLI.
Caddis-Worms . .
Prof. Dorothy Merrill of the
zoology department will talk on
"Case Building and Case Recogni-
tion in Caddis-Worms" at 4 p.m.
today in Rm. 1400 Chemistry Bldg.
Open House*...

today from 4 to 6 p.m. All students which was taken among working

are welcome.

Phonology. . .
Sarah Budschinsky, the Brazil
branch consultant of the Summer
Institute of Linguistics, will speak
on "High-Level Phonology" at 8
p.m. today in 3008 North Hall.
'lolanthe' . .
The Gilbert and Sullivan So-.
ciety will present "Iolanthe" at 8
p.m. today in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
Convention . .
The Washtenaw County Repub-
lican Convention will be held to-
day at 8 p.m. in Tappan High
School Aud., Brockman at Stadium
Blvd.
Red China . .
Prof. James Crump of the Far
Eastern Studies Department will
speak on "Red China's Cultural
Image" at 7 p.m. today in the
Multipurpose Rm. of the UGLI.
Bureaucracy . .
Prof. M. Kent Jennings of the
political science department will
discuss "The Image of the Federal
Bureaucracy" at 8 p.m. today in
Rackham Aud as a part of a Poli-
tical Science Roundtable.
Bartok -..
An all Bartok program of per-
cussion and piano will be present-
ed at 8:30 p.m. today in Aud A
as partof the music school's DMA
piano series.

students, was designed to obtain
information concerning w h e r e
students work, what kind of wages
they earn, and how their job re-

cinepa CuildQ
Program Information

ELI WALLACH
MELINA MERCOURI
JEANNE MOREAU
VINCE EDWARDS
ALBERT FINNEY
GEORGE HAMILTON

DIAL 5-6290
Shows at
1:00-3:40-6:25-9:10

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Li 'l

AUDITIO NS
for
The Country Playhouse, Inc.
Theatre-in-the-round

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South Bend, Indiana

Phone BL 9-4637

;1,

I

APRIL 18, 1964

11

'' i

PLACE:
TIME:

South Bend-Public
Library Auditorium
9 a.m. to 6 pm.
E.S.T.

Mats.-75c

Eves. & Sun.-$1.00

President and
Hatcher will hold

Mrs. Harlan
an Open House

"DR. STRANGELOVE"
'Starts Friday and Will Be ShPwnatM
1:00 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:05 P.M.

Season Includes
OKLAHOMA UNDER THE YUM-YUM TREE
PYGMALION- COME BLOW YOUR HORN
WHERE'S CHARLEY SEE HOW THEY RUN

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SPECIAL ATTRACTION:
GUEST FILM CRITIC
MISS PAULINE KAEL
SERIES TICKETS 2.50
avaliable at Cinema Guild

Dial 2-6264

ENDING FRIDAY *
Shows Start at 1 :00
2:50-4:55-7:00 & 9:05

Terms of Contract:

ROOM & BOARD

A

TRAVELING EXPENSES from Ann Arbor to South
Bend paid for those accepted into resident com-
pany. Company will be in residence from June 7,
to Aug. 17
John S. Johnson, President
212 N. Wenger, Mishawaka, Indiana

".4

TWO-SUPER SERGEANTS WHO LEAVE
THE PEACE-TIME ARMY IN PIECES!I

The million buck
schemes they daredi
The luscious dolls
they shared!

Ii

I 1111EI

All Are Welcome to

W

OPENING NIGHT
42.'Ianthie

INDIA STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
SPRNG BANOUET
on
1Saturday, April 11,-1964 at 7:00 P.M.
Michigan Union Ball Room
Guest Speaker: DR. PETER CLANCY
Director of programs, Mott Foundations, Flint
II

ALWED ARTISTS
C mS

Gilbert & Sullivan

The barracks i
rn"Ir uthen

a*I lJmautI

I

* .1# 44 4 q4 'ii 'UUTh arak

IIM

ii m 111. m

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