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March 14, 1964 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-03-14

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MARCHT 14. 1964

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN J~AILY

J AA WaW"CA.&f ITAL JMWdALA A K, JLOVl

C

CHINESE GROWTH:
Bellah Traces Development

By BRIAN BEACH
The Communist system in China
is the functional equivalent to the
left wing of the Protestant Refor-
mation, Prof. Robert N. Bellah of
Harvard University emphasized in
a Wednesday colloquium co-spon-
sored by the sociology department
and the center for Chinese studies.
"The left wing of the Protestant
Reformation, characterized by
Calvinism and Puritanism, de-
veloped a kind of person who was
inclined to affect change in the
world," he said.
Similarly in an historical pro-
cess stretching over a century, the
traditional Confucian ethic, which
contrasted sharply with the Puri-
tan ethic, was replaced by the
Communist system, Prof. Bellah
continued.
Attack
"In the 1890's, Tan Ssu-tung
began to re-interpret the Confu-
cian ethic. He attacked the tra-
ditional three 'bonds' of ruler-
subject, father-son and husband-]
wife. Among the five traditional
relationships Tan Ssu-tung con-
sidered the. one between friends
best and the one between brothers
good because they were equalitar-
ian," Prof. Bellah said.
In the next stage Lu Hsun, char-
acterized Confucianism' in his
stories as an insane world in which
man eats man, Prof. Bellah added.'
"The positive conception of hu-
man action that these men held
was close to the Puritan concep-
tion." The Communist ethic rep-
resents the continuation of the
trends led by Tan Ssu-tung and
Lu Hsun," he said.
Commitment
Prof. Bellah claimed the Chinese
Communists required personal
commitment of its people to their
system, as did the left wing of the
Protestant Reformation. This con-
trasts with the Confucian ethic
which required an external com-
mitment.
Comparing the Protestant Ref-
ormation mandate that men "serve
the will of God" and the Com-
munist mandate that men work
"to better society," he noted that.
both ethics have an "open end
Across
Campus
The first project of the newly
inaugurated program of Children's
Theater productions is 'The Land
of the Dragon", directed by Mar-
garet McKerrow of the speech de-
partment. It will be presented at
10 a.m. and 1 p.m. today in True-
blood Aud.
This play is the first in a drama'
program designed for the children
*in the community. The series was
started by the University of Michi-
gan Players in coordination with
the Junior Theater of the Ann
Arbor Recreation Dept.
As part of the program the Uni-
versity speech department will
offer two courses especially de-
signed for training in children's
theater.'
This summer a course in chil-
drens theater will be available. In
the fall there 'will be 'another
course in creative drama.
The sponsoring organizations
plan to put on one production
written for a child audience each
semester.
They will be acted by adults
and be designed to appeal to an
age group from 4 to 12 year olds.
"
DIAL 5-6290
4th and Final Week

view of society as contrasted with
the static Confucian view.
Both systems developed a sense
of sin and personal inadequacy, he
continued.
Emphasizing that a unified fam-
ily structure is all important in

developing a kind of person who
will affect change in the world, he
sa:d, "I think the commune sys-
tem was designed to destroy the
traditional family structure in
hopes of establishing a conjugal
family system."

U.S. Education Faces
Challenge of AutomatioTn

(Continued from Page 1)
sending particular instructors out,
we can in some cases send their
recorded lectures."
Prof. Stanford Erickson, direc-
tor of the Center for Research on
Learning and Teaching, sees a
good future for another use of
automation - programmed learn-
ing.
Teaching Machines
"Several University courses at
present use programmed texts, but
the main future use of the pro-
gramming method could be in
t e a c h i n g machines," Erickson
said. "These machines use timed
programs and can serve as tutors
for individual students.
"There are many such machines
in use today, but at present more
experimentation and more money
is needed before they can be used
on a large scale."
Erickson foresees an eventual
wide use of "teaching carrels."
These are small units or stalls such
as those in the Undergraduate Lib-
rary and language labs.
Teaching Carrels
"In the future, carrels such as
these can be supplied with audio
input through recorded lectures,
visual input through television or
video tape and written verbal in-
put through 'teaching machines',"
Erickson said.
In this way the student could
stay in one place-possibly a car-
rel in his own room-and have
many of the advantages of text,
library and lecture at his finger-
tips, Erickson added.
He notes, however, that the
one most significant obstacle to
the use of carrels as well as other
forms of automation in the col-
Teges may be the university pro-
fessor himself.

sition from teachers. And so it has
ever since.
"Opposition arises because auto-
mation takes away some of the
functions of the teacher. It is nat-
ural that he opposes it, but it is
important to note that automa-
tion takes away from the teacher
only the repetitive, time-consum-
ing tasks of presentation of in-
formation.
"It does not hurt at all the most
important function of the teacher
--interpreting the information. By
printing books, taping lectures,
and using TV we can leave the
professor time for small seminar
classes and interpretation for in-
dividual students.
Free from Tedium
"In this light, it is best to think
of automation not as a money-
saver, but as a device to free the
professor from tedious tasks for
his most important duties."
Prof. Guy E. Swanson, chair-'
man of the department of sociol-
ogy, agrees with Erickson in sep-
arating presentation of informa-
tion from interpretation.
"When a teacher is interested
in presenting not only informa-
tion but also a point of view,
automation does not suffice as a
substitute for 'live teaching'," he
said. "For this reason, I would
not wish to use' widespread auto-
mation in o u r introductory
courses, where a basic point of
view toward societies, as opposed
to specific information, is being
transmitted.
"However, the use of automa-
tion does not 'shock' me. Closed
circuit TV, for example, has great'
potential in the University."
Prof. Arthur W. Bromage, chair-
man.of the department of political
science, sees a good future for
automated devices such as taped
lectures and television as a sup-
plement for regular courses.
"Taping of the lectures of 'stars'
in a field is a good idea for en-
richment of courses," he added.
"This method can have particular
advantage at smaller colleges,.
where the faculty is not as large
and varied as is the University's."

Committee
Announces
BoothPlans'
The Michigras Central Commit-
tee has announced the final booths
for spring, 1964. The following are
show booths:
Huber and Thronson, "9 and 44/100
per cent pure???"; Delta Upsilon and
Chi Omega, "Mickey Mouse Club";
Hunt and Taylor, "Bugs Bunny's Hare-
house"; Zeta Beta Tau and Kappa
Alpha Theta, "That Was The World.
That Was."
Sigma Alpha Mu and Alpha Epsilon
Phi, "Life and Death of TV. MacBeth";
Delta Kappa Epsilon and Pi Beta Phi,
"Candid Campus"; Kappa Kappa Gam-
ma and Phi Gamma Delta, "Naked
UGLI"; Alpha Delta Pi and Lambda
Chi Alpha, "Fishivision."
Stomach Through
Adams and Jordon, "Down, Down,
Down the Stomach Through"; Phi Sig-
ma Delta and Oxford, "Ding Dong
School"; Trigon and Mosher, "Hatcher
House Party"; Delta Delta Delta and
Beta Theta Pi, "Morgus Presents 'The
Day of Doom'."
Delta Phi Epsilon and Theta Xi, "The
Inside Story"; Triangle and Phi Mu,
"Friday Night at the Movies."
Skill Booths: Michigan and Little.
"Sloppy Sales Michivision Show"; Chi
Psi and Alpha Chi Omega, "Gunsmoke";
Alpha Gamma Delta and Theta Delta
Chi, "Riverboat Gamble."
'U' View
Sigma Delta Tau and Alpha Epsilon
Pi, "'U' View"; Cooley and Newberry,
"Midnight Zone: From the Unknown to
the Unknown"; Alpha Phi and Sigma
Alpha Epsilon, "Greatest Show on
Earth"; Pi Lambda Phi and Sigma Kap-
pa, "The Everglades."
Refreshment Booths: Fisher and
Frost, "Michi-Tiki"; Kappa Delta and
Alpha Sigma, "Hawaiian Eye"; Zeta
Tau Alpha and Phi Kappa Tau, "Din's
Den." The Chinese Club, "Tea Garden
of the Dragon Year"; Gomberg and
Bush, "Seahunt Cafeteria."

The Daily Official Bulletin Is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be sent
in TYPEWRITTEN form to Room
3564 Administration Building before
2 p.m. of the day preceding publica-
tion, and by 2 p.m. Friday for Satur-
day and Sunday.
SATURDAY, MARCH 14
Day Calendar
Michigan Conference on Employment-
Bound Youth-Registration, Rackham
Bldg., 8 a.m.
Swimming-Mich. High School Swim-
ming Champions (Class "A'):, Matt
Mann Pool, 10 a.m., 2 p.m., and 8 p.m.
*Cinema Guild-Jean Renoir's "Picnic
on the Grass"; plus short: Architecture
Aud., 7 p.m. and 9 p.m.
For Other University Events today
see the Across Campus column.
General Notices
Grad and Undergrad Men wishing
housing in the residence halls for the
Summer Session may apply beginning
Mon., March 16, at the Office of Resi-
dence Halls, 3011 SAB.-
Grad and Undergrad Women desiring
housing for the Summer Session may
apply beginning Mon., March 16, at the
appropriate office inthe SAB. Those
desiring residence halls housing will
apply at the Office of Residence Hails,
3011 SAB; those who wish housing in
sorority houses, international houses,
etc., should apply at the Office of,
Assoc. Housing, 1011 SAB.
A Final Reminder: All LSA scholar-
ship applications will be due Mon.,
March 16, 1964, in 1220 Angell Hall.
Ushers Are Urgently Needed for the

Odetta Show in Hill Aud. on Sat.,
March 14.
Anyone who is interested in ushering
for this show please report to Mr.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
Alpha Omega Fellowship, All Uni-
, versity students welcome to Alpha
Omega Fellowship weekly lecture and
discussion; intellectual examination of
Biblical Claims and their relevance to
the campus situation, Sun., March 15,
10 a.m., Grace Bible Church, 110 N.
State St.
Alpha Phi Omega, Executive Board
meeting, March 15, 4 pum., Room 3516
SAB.
* .* *
Cinema Guild, Film showing: Jean
Renoir's "Picnic on the Grass" (in
color), March 14 and 15, 7 and 9 p.m.,
Architecture Aud.
* * ,,,

Warner at 7:30 p.m. on Sat., March 14,
to the east door of Hill Aud.
Graduate Record Examinations: Ap-
plication blanks for the Graduate Rec-
ord Exam are available in 122 Rackham
Bldg. The next administration of the
test for 1964 will be on Sat., April 25,
at Eastern Mich. Univ., Ypsilanti, Mich.
Applications must be received in
Princeton, N.J. by April 10.
The Hayward Keniston Lecture: The
fourth Hayward Keniston lecture,
"Truth, an Insufficient Goal," will be
delivered by Prof. Mark H. Ingraham
of the Univ. of Wis., Tues., March 17,
at 4:15 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
Final Payment of Spring Semester Fees
is due and payable on or before March
31, 1964.
If fees are not paid by this date:
1) A $10.00 delinquent penalty will be
charged.
2) A "Hold Credit" will be placed
against you. This means that until pay-
ment is received and "Hold Credit" is
cancelled:
(1) Grades will not be mailed.
(2) Transcripts will not be furnished.
(3) You may not register for future
semesters.
(4) A Senior may not graduate with

DALY 0 OFCIALBULEI
.n..~w.%v.W .

his class at the close of the current
semester.
3) The Dean of your school or college
will be given a list of delinquent ac-
counts.
Payments may be mace in person, or
mailed to the Cashier's Office, 1015 Ad-
min. Bldg., betore 4:30 p.m., March 31,
1964.
Mail Payments postmarked after due
date, March 31. 1964, are late and sub-
ject to penalty.
Identify mail payment as tuition and
show student number and name.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Federal Service Entrance Exam - The
next FSEE exam will be on April 18.
You must apply for this exam by March
19.
Bamberger's, Div, of R. H. Macy & Co.,
New Jersey-Holding a Career Open
House to acquaint college students or
recent grads with this department store
organization. There will be two ses-
sessions, one on Thurs., March 26 and
the second on Thurs., April 2 In the
Newark store, 131 Market St. Program
will begin at 10 a.m. Anyone interest-
ed is welcome to attend.
St. Luke's Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio
(Continued on Page 6)

r

,..
I

J. y

Congregational Disciples, E&R,
Student Guild, Sunday Seminar,'
Early Church," March 15, 7-8
Guild House, 802 Monroe.
* * *

EUB
,.The
p.m.,

V.

Graduate Outing Club, Meeting, Sun.,
March 15, 2 p.m., Huron St. Entrance,
Rackham Bldg.
Hillel Grad Group, Bowling party,
Sun., March 15, 7:405 p.m., Huron
Lanes, 320 E. Huron St.
* *
Lutheran Student Center & Chapel,
Worship services, Sun., March 15, 9:30
and 11 a.m., 11 a.m. service, "Seven
Last Words of Christ from the Cross"
-choir and soloists. 7 p.m., Dr. Frank
Huntley, English dept., speaker. Hill
St. at S. Forest Ave.
* * *
ULLR Ski Club, Meeting, Tues., March
17, Third Floor, Michigan Union, Mo-
vies on ski techniques and final plans
for the trips to Aspen and Nub's Nob.
Unitarian Student Group, No meet-
ing this week, next meeting April 5.
DIXIELAND
"The New Wolverine

DEMAND IS GREAT
So We Have Arranged to
Present a Special
STUDENT SATURDAY MATINEE.
"THE MIRACLE WORKER"
Saturday, March 21-2:00 p.m.-.75
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
First Come-Best Seat-No Reservations

I

i
if
i
i
t 1
Ii
rr
r
1
i
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iy

STUDENTS and FACULTY

Dial 662-8871 for

MARCH 14, 1964
ODETTA I

infema ld/d
Program Information

Jass Band"

OLD HEIDELBERG
-TONIGHT-

I-

I

F

In this respect, Erickson,
Stirton" puts his subject in
spective.

like
per-

I

w : . . . .

Before Going to the
MONTE CARLO BALL Saturday

II DIAL 8-6416

Long History
".Automation, as the use of ma-
chines to supplement human ef-
fort, has a long history," he said.
"The first main use of automa-
tion - in mass mechine-printed
books-met with tremendous oppo-

eat at
EIEW

"A STUNNING
PERFORMANCE!

DON'T FORGET

Golden Tree Room

Town and Country Room

our weekly
SUNDAY BUFFET
TOMORROW-March 15, 5-8 P.M.

Main Dining Room

... Leslie Caron imbues it
with tremendous compas-
sion and charm!"
-New York Times
"A beautiful and refreshing
film. A masterpiece of can-
dor and sensitivity."
-Time Magazine
BRfTrN's A, M#- AWARD WINNER
41EST ACTRESS
LESLIE
CIRIN

+'
i. ;

Featuring

MAINE LIVE LOBSTERS

and

ODETTA

CHAMPAGNE COCKTAILS

at the fabulous

INN AMERICA
Catering to the tastes, comforts,
and convenience of U. of M. students

Mon. thru Thurs.
I 1':30 a.m.- 1 p.m. 1

Fri. and Sat. Sunday
1:30 a.m.- a.m. Noon - 8:30 p.m.

Development Coun cil
Concert

JACKSON ROAD AT THE 1-94 AND M-14 EXIT

Starts at 8:30 P.M.

I

-DELICIOUS BUFFET
(all you can eat!)
BEAUTIFUL MUSIC
for listening and dancing

J

MINATED
FOR

10

ACADEMY
AWARDS

"BEST COMEDY
EVER MADE //
-Newsweek
tw.h,
The whole

I

i

by RICK PERRY
and the BRUCE FISHERRQUARTET
Make this a Sunday habit. You'll be glad you did.
HELD OVER
DIAL 2nd Week
2-6264 Shows at 1:00-2:55
4 :55-7 :00 & 9:10
"Seven Days In May" Provides Only Hints of Greatness, But a Great
Deal of Exciting, Worthwhile Entertainment.-H. Holland, Mich. Daily
1hm a3militarypo
to take overths AJ
nextSunday ".
moort
'' I
"" "- A

University of Michigan
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
presents
THE 4TH PLAY OF THE MONTH
DAVID MERRICK airedFm
in association with 2 SEASONS ON BROADWAY!
BERNARD DELFONT SENSATONF LONDON & NEW YORK

Ticket Sales NOW

I

It

withIuM a[THIS SAMADULTPICTURE
$ERNARD LEE' -BROCK PETERS-c c" COURTNEIDGE
PATRICIA PHOENIXand EMLYNMIAMS

$1.50

$1.25

$1.00

at

HILL AUD. BOX OFFICE

KENNETH
NELSON

EAJOAN
EASTMAN

roomporar

Ilrrrl Mlr1

I;

I

THE SENSATIONALMUSICAL NIT!

Creative Arts Festival and Professional Theatre Program

ANTHONY NEWLEY'S
$Oro TlE WoRLj=
I WANToGET oFF

present

4

Bo.Mui gdmW vrs b
LESLIE tANTHONY
BRICUSSE - NEWLET

W. Nodal

NORRIS HOUGHTON
co-founder and co-ordinator

world loves
76n

FAMED FOR
"WHAT KIND OF FOOL AM f
"GONNA BUILD A MOUNTAINw
"ONCE IN A LIFETIME"

Phoenix Theatre in New York

I

I

I iAL ~A AA rl r 11 " u o3 A I

who will speak on

I

. I

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