100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 28, 1964 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-02-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

TIIC MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY. FEERTTARY M 144th''

PAGETWO ~'R~lAV ~TTAI~VE Lba * ** *W[C==W. i l .&1V'

ra a.a rsar., rr a tuan za, 1 U4

ACTIVITIES, PUBLIC IMAGE:
Groups Explore U' Concerns
4, ('4

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

I
H
C
K
A
t;
?i

Tau Delta, Party; Delta Upsilon, Party;
Hayden, Open Open; Hinsdale, Open
Open; Jordan Hall, Leap Year Dance;
Kelsey, Lounge Dance; Lambda Chi
Alpha, Dance-Party; Phi Epsilon Pi, Par-
ty.
Phi Gamma Delta, Dance Party; Phi
Kappa Psi, Dinner-6-9; Phi Kappa
Tau, Informal Party; Phi Sigma Delta,
Fireside Party; Psi Upsilon, Party; Scott,
Lounge Party; Tau Delta Phi, Late
Party; Triangle, Dance; Trigon, Party
and Open Open House; Van Tyne
House, Open House after concert; Zeta
Beta Tau, Open Open; Zeta Psi, Band

prog. For further info. & applications,
writ e:Mrs. M. Kabat, COMOI, 515 Park
Ave., New York 22, N.Y.
C. W. Post College of Long Island
Univ.-Five-week summer sessions: June
22-July 24 & July 27-Aug. 28. Both day
& evening. Accelerate your degree pro-
gram. Undergraduate course offerings
in many & various fields including 5
institutes on World Affairs Workshop
on United Nations. The college is
just 30 min. from the World's Fair & 1
hr. from N.Y. City. Applications for
summer session bulleti navail. on bul-
letin board outside Rm. 3200 SAB.

U

(EDITOR'S NOTE: These are the
eleventh and twelfth parts in a
series of 16 articles covering the
Conference on the University ses-
sions which took place Friday and
Saturday.)
'U' Image
By ROBERT HIPPLER
The Conference session on "Im-
age. of the University" recom-
mended that the University be re-
alistic in its future efforts to pro-
ject its image to the public.
Particular emphasis on future
enrollment, faculty, and financial
prospects will elicit interest from
the public.
The University should display
its role and prospects as it sees
them, and not necessarily as it
thinks the public would like to
see them, the panelists agreed.
"U" Role
In trying to determine this role,
criticism was leveled at the faculty
for being more interested in its
own self-perpetuation, the train-
ing of future faculty, than in
training the majority of students
to think and to face the outside
world.
Research image promoters, on
the other hand, came under fire
from the conferees for trying to
envision the University exclusively.
as a tool of industry, tending to
Across
Camp us
The ONCE Festival of Contem-
porary Music will feature the
Brandeis University Ch a m b er
Chorus, directed by Alvin Lucier,
at 8:30 p.m. today ,in the VFW
Ballroom.
Consort of Viols*...
The University Consort of viols
will perform at 8:30 p.m. today in
Rackham Aud. Works by Dowland,
Byrd, and Monteverdi will be in-
cluded in the program.
* * *
'U' Players.. .
The University Players will pre-
sent Max Frisch's "The Firebugs"
at 8 p.m. today in Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre.
Peace Corps...
The Peace Corps representatives
on campus will be showing a movie
of Corps volunteers at work today
at 7, 8 and 9 p.m. in Rm. 3G of
the Michigan Union.
The one-half hour movie will be.
followed by a question and answer
period after each showing, Rich-
ard Graham, Corps director in Tu-
nisia, announced.

neglect the needs of students and
faculty.
Conferees also criticized the ad-
ministration for thinking of money
too much in terms of general use
and not enough in terms of specific
allocation.
Mesh Together
The panel stated that these sev-
eral interests should not conflict,
but should mesh together to allow
the University to function in a
triple role as:
1) an institution to educate stu-
dents and prepare them for the
outside world;
2) an instrument to perpetuate
itself through more and better fac-
ulty training and replacement;
and
3) a focal point of research in
both basic and applied fields.
Working on this premise, the
panel questioned how the Univer-
sity should project its triple func-
tion to the public.
"Alexander Michigander," the
public information pamphlet the
University distributes is one
means, the panel said. But it pro-
motes an overly optimistic view of
the University's accomplishments.
Ethics
It presents the University as a
seemingly omnipotent power, and
it does not give strong enough em-
phasis to future problems, the
group stressed.
Several conferees questioned the
premise that the University should
in fact expose itself fully and real-
istically to the public. They pro-
posed that the University concen-
trate on showing the public mainly
that which is useful in either
stating the University's purposes
or obtaining sufficient educational
funds.
This idea was criticized as hav-
ing one main fault. Such an idea,
taking "Alexander Michigander"
as a prime example, might have
short-range success, but it would
fail eventually by not informing
and arousing the public of future
problems facing the University.
Student Activities
By JOHN BRYANT
Student activities do have an
educational value.
However, there is a basic con-
flict between these activities and
academic pursuits the student ac-
tivities discussion section of the
Conference concluded.
In attempting to help ease this
problem, the group proposed that
faculty and student groups discuss
what further rewards might be of-
fered for student activities partici-
pation.
Reflects Changes
Prof. Marvin Felheim of the
English department saw the prob-
lem as one related to the basic
changes going on in the Univer-

PROF. MARVIN FELHEIM
sity. "We're getting more students
without corresponding resources.
At the same time there is a ques-
tion as to the value of student ac-
tivities. These activities ought to
be incorporated into the educa-
tional system in some more con-
crete way," he said. -
Prof. Marc Pilisuk of the psy-
chology department proposed that
academic credit be given for cer-
tain activities.
"Students are receiving as much
benefit from some outside activi-
ties as they are from classes;
therefore why not give them
course credit for these activities,"
he asked.
Prof. Felheim suggested that
payment of salaries to those in-
volved in student activities might
remove some of the barriers to
student participation.
"Some student leaders, such as
The Daily senior editors and Mich-
igan Union senior officers receive
monetary compensation for their
services which enables them to pay
for meals they miss and other ad-
ditional expenses they incur."
There is no reason why others
in student activities should not
receive similar treatment, he add-
ed .
Opposition
Thomas Palmer, '64L, however,
said that participation in student
activities ought to be enough in-
centive in itself to attract students.
Ronald Martinez, '66, also op-
posed the compensatory plans,
asking where the line would be
drawn as to which activities would
merit credit or salary.
He, questioned whether a student
leader would receive credit or sal-
ary even if he "had been incompe-
tent in his position." The propos-
als are too complex and many-
sided to be workable, he said.
"Academic" Housing
The group felt that present
"academic" housing projects had
been valuable and considered
what might be done to improve the
academic conditions in other hous-
ing units.
Mrs. Elizabeth Davenport, as-
sistant to the vice-president for
student affairs, felt one problemn
lay in obtaining staff for "academt-
ic" housing.
"We searched an entire summer
to find the right people for six
staff positions in the honors
houses.
"To find similar people for the
entire residence hall system would
be extremely difficult, if not im-
possible," she added.

The Daily Official Bulletin is anI
official publication of the Univer-V
sity of Michigan for which TheL
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-P
ial responsibility. Notices should bea
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form toE
Room 3564 Administration Build-E
ing before 2 p.m. of the day pre-F
ceding publication, and by 2 p.m.L
Friday for Saturday and Sunday. 1
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28 c
Day Calendar
Track - Federation Championships:
Yost Field House, 1 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
Cinema Guild-Kaneto Shindo's 'The n
Island," plus short, Kronick's "A Bowl
of Cherries": Architecture Aud., 7 p.m.t
and 9 p.m.F
Dept. of Engineering Mechanics Sem- g
inar: Theodore R. Tauchert, Dept. ofg
Engineering and Applied Science, YaleI
University, will speak on "The Responset
of a Multi-Degree-of-Freedom Systemp
Mounted Upon a Non-Linear Support,"
Room 305, West Engineering, 4 p.m.
Biological Chemistry Colloquium: Dr.
Robert S. Bandursk, Dept. of Botany
and Plant Pathology, Michign State
Univ., will speak on "Biological Reduc-
tion of Sulfate to Sulfide." M6423 Med.
Sci. Bldg. at 4 p.m. Coffee at 3:30 in
M5410 Med. S.
For Other University Events today
see the Across Campus column.
General Notices
In Accordance with the Federal Reve-
nue Act of 1964, the University will
withhold income tax from wages at the
new rate effective March 6, 1964.
NDEA Title IV: Departmental applica-
tions for NDEA Title IV grants for
tenure starting 1965-66 will be due in
the Graduate Shcool by about May 15
1964, according to a new schedule just
announced by the Office of Education.
Application forms will be available in
Room 118 Rackham shortly after April
15.
Women's Research Club of the Univ.
of Mich. will meet on Mon., March 2,
at 8 p.m. in the West Conference Room
of the Rackham Bldg. Miss Mary Crich-
ton, assistant professor of German, will
Idiscuss "The Visionary Realism of the
German Poetess, Annette von Dros-
Hushoff."
Events
The following student sponsored
events are approved for the coming
weekend. Social Chairmen are reminded
that requests for approval for social
events are due in the Office of Student
Affairs not later than 12 o'clock noon
on the Tues. prior to the event.
FEB. 28-
Alpha Omicron Pi, Pledge Party; Chi
Psi, Informal band party; Cooley House,,
Open Open; Kappa Alpha Phi, Party;
Kappa Delta, Record Party; Kappa Kap-
pa Gamma & Alpha Phi, Barn Dance;
Nursing Council (School of Nursing),
Dance; Lloyd House, Open Open; Phi
Kappa Tau, Informal party-4:30-6; Phi
Kappa Tau, Informal Party-8-12; Sig-
ma Phi Epsilon, TG; Thronson, Mixer
with Scott, VanTyne, Bush, Hunt; Zeta
Beta Tau, TGIF.
FEB. 2-J
Alpha Delta Phi, Theme Party; Al-1
pha Tau Omega, Dance; Chi Phi, Party;
Delta Kappa Epsilon, Band Party; Delta
ORGANIZAT!ON
NOTICES I
Alpha Omega Fellowship, Weekly
meeting. All University students wel-
come to Alpha Omega Fellowship, week-
ly lecture and discussion; intellectual
examination of Biblical claims and
their relevance to the campus situation.
Sunday, 10 a.m., Grace Bible Church,
110 N. State St.
, . *
Michigan Christian Fellowship-Dis-
cussion Hour: "What We Are," Feb. 28,
7:30 p.m., Union Side Door.
INewman-Fr. Augustine Wilhelmy will
speak on "The Emerging Layman," 8
p.m., Newman Center, 331 Thompson St.
Square and Folk Dance Club-Week-
ly meeting, beginners' instruction 8:30
to 9:30 p.m., open dancing 9:30 to 10:30
p.m. Caller. Ted Brott, Feb. 28, Wom-
Ien's tAhetic Bldg.
a
Unitarian Student Group, Meeting,
"Bible Study," March 1, 7:30 p.m., Uni-
tarian Church, 1917 Washtenaw.
University of Michigan Folklore So-
ciety-Workshop, guitar and banjo, Feb.
29, 1:30 p.m., 3rd floor, SAB.
Congregational Disciples, E&R. EUB
Student Guild, Friday noon luncheon,
speakers: Robert Butman and Henrick
Ating, "From the Bottom Up," Feb. 28,
12 noon to 1 p.m., 802 Monroe Guild
House.

Party; Zeta Tau Alpha, Leap Year
Dance. POSITION OPENINGS:
MARCH 1- National Society for Crippled Chil-
Alpha Xi Delta, Pledge Open Open; dren & Adults-The employment bulle-
Stockwell Hall, Open Open. tin is available in the Bureau of Ap-
MARCH 5- pointments. The bulletin tells about em-
Jordan Hall, International Tea. ployment oppor, at summer camps and
positions in the following categories:
Occu. Therapy, Exec.-Admin., Physical
Therapy. Psych., Rehab. & Vocational
Counseling, Social service, Spec. Ed.,
ANNOUNCEMENT: etc.
Committee on Manpower Opportuni- Associated Credit Bureaus of Ameri-
ties in Israel-Announcing Graduate can, Inc., St. Louis, Mo.-1) Ass't. Educ.
Fellowship program for Industrial En- Dir. Will supv. the personnel of the
gnrs. & grads of Business Admin. Pro- Educ. Dept. & see that the dept. is
gram starts in Israel at end of Aug., '64. run efficiently &economically. 2) Trav-
Loans are avail. First will be orienta- eling Lecturer-will conduct the Assoc.
tion, then on-the-job trng., then em- traveling educ. programs throughout
ployment & finally advanced studies (Continued on Page 3)

STUDENTS and FACULTY
Dial 662-8871 for
Cinema qaild
Program Information

i

- I~

Ills

+
sj 4:.c
;rI

I

Shows Start at
1:05-3:00-5:00-7:00 and 9:05

Dial 2-6264

Petition For
MUSKET
GENERAL CHAIRMAN'
Feb. 28-March 8
May Pick Up Petitions at

I

I-

UNION MAIN

DESK Anytime

II

i. 9 l

C" ELIZABETH MARTIN JILL
MONTGOMERY BALSAM ST.JOHN
RICHARD " LOUiS JACK MACHA 10O OIANNE ELUO"
CONTE -"NYE-S00-MERIL:TANI'FOSTEREID and CAROL BURNETT
STARTING SUNDAY
M-&"M presents
6 Seven Ars Production
FREE FREE FREE
Students and Faculty
PICK UP YOUR VERY OWN
SPR I NG 1964
FILM SCHEDULE
I N POSTER FORM
Suitable for
(1) FRAMING
(2) COVERING WALL CRACKS
(3) IMPRESSING FRIENDS WITH
YOUR CULTURED TASTE IN
FINE FILM ENTERTAINMENT
Available at the Theatre
JUST ASK FOR IT!
(And You'll Get I t!)

ARMY NAVY AIR FORCE
ROTC U N ITS
Present
"BLUE MIST"
Annual Military Ball
Friday, March 6-9:00 p.m.
Michigan League Ballroom
TICKETS ON SALE AT NORTH HALL
ALL MILITARY PERSONNEL INVITED

I

t __.._

4

ONCE
Concerts through Sunday
VFW BALLROOM
Tonight at 8:30:
BRANDEIS CHAMBER CHORUS
Tickets at Record Center,
Disc Shop and Bob Marshall's

- t
I,
i
!,
I
;,
r
S
.
i
,,

DIAL 5-6290
Remember
The First Night
Feature Starts 6:45
Shows at 1:15-3:45-6:30-9:05
Feature 15 Min. Later
2ND WEEK
(Stays at Least thru Mar. 5th)
NOMINATED FOR
10
ACADEMY
AWARDS
including
BEST PICTURE!
BEST ACTOR !
BEST DIRECTOR!
Prices This Show Only
Weekday Mats. $1 .00
Eves. and Sunday $1.25

"The saga of 'TOM JONES'
Vibrant Comic Classic!"
-Hugh Holland
Mich. Doily
"BEST COMEDY
EVER MANwsw
tNww~b
9.,

I

t

441

~~1

The whole
worldoes
ones

PETITION NOW
for League Positions

4

I

I-__=

SGC FORUM
CANDIDATES SPEAK OUT

Petitions available in League Undergrad.

Office

Interviews through March 7

I

University of Michigan
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
Presents

I

iiil

7:00 P.M.

4

I

UNION BALLROOM
Sunday, March 1, 1964

I

I

NEW YORK AIR CHARTER
sponsored by
WOLVERINE CLUB

John Hersey

1

s

THE

From Rome came a salesman gregarious,
To Sweden for reductions nefarious.
The girls were so fair,
and some of them b-,
and what happened is downright hilarious.

DIAL 8-6416
STARTING TODAY

SPRING VACATION

CHILD
BUYER

A Dino De Laurentis Production

LEAVE. . . . . . . . . . . MARCH20

RETURN -.

MARCH 30

w . s s S s w " "

1 40ANMYME Alk I

A NEW PLAY by

Paul Shvre

Lto

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan