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February 28, 1964 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-02-28

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1964 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ow-mmamoso

U.S Announces
Arsenal Increase,
Conferees Note Nuclear Growth
While Disarmament Talks Continue
GENEVA OP)-The United States disclosed yesterday that its
nuclear arsenal has increased 200 per cent in the two years that
disarmament talks have droned on in Geneva.
Conceding that new efforts to get the talks moving have col-
lapsed, United States negotiator William C. Foster declared that by

PEACE CORPS:
Score Anti-American Protests

4

Romney Plots'
Counter Plan
For Districts
LANSING (A)) - Gov. George
Romney yesterday made it clear1
his office is studying a counter-
attack on "one man, one vote"
legislative districting, should that
be the choice of the Michigan]
Supreme Court.
In the last press conference be-
fore leaving for a Hawaiian vaca-
tion, he mentioned constitutional
amendment and federal or state
court appeals as possible~ counter-.
moves.
The State Supreme Court will
hold oral arguments next Monday
and Tuesday on four plans sub-
mitted by the deadlocked Legisla-
tive Apportionment Commission.
A decision is expected in early
or mid-March.
Romney said the main Demo-
cratic plan, based on a contention
that the state constitution's "equal
protection" clause requires equal-
population districting, "couldn't
possibly conform with the appor-
tionment formula of the new con-
stitution."
Last week, Romney said he did
not believe a recent United States
Supreme Court decision favoring
the "one man, one vote" principle
posed a threat to Michigan's con-
gressional or legislative apportion-
ment.
However, Thomas Kavanagh,'
chief Justice of the Michigan Su-
preme Court, later said the Geor-
gia decision "will have impact on
all apportionment."
British Ponder
Troop Removal
UNITED NATIONS ?P)-Britain
hinted yesterday it would with-
draw its troops from Cyprus unless
the United Nations Security Coun-
cil takes quick action to dispatch
an international peace force to
that strife-torn Mediterranean is-
land.
The British troops are current-
ly enforcing a shaky cease-fire
agreement between Greek and
Turkish Cypriots. Britain dis-
patched troops to Cyprus after
violence flared there in late De-
cember.

next year United States strategic
missile inventories "will reach ap-
proximately 750 per cent of those
in 1962."
After an appeal to the Russians
to help end the disarmament
stalemate, Foster left by plane for
Washington to consult with the
government. The Russians did not
budge.
Foster told the conference it
must try to stop the nuclear build-
up on both sides immediately. He
appealed to Soviet negotiator
Semyon K. Tsarapkin to enter into
detailed negotiations on President
Lyndon B. Johnson's proposals to
freeze missile production and de-
velopment and halt the produc-
tion of fissionable material for
nuclear warheads.
The Soviet delegate replied, "A
freeze will not have the effect of
ending the arms race."
Tsarapkin insisted again that
the conference begin immediate
negotiations on the Soviet pro-
posal to cut military budgets 10-15
per cent. He referred to increased
military spending in Great Britain
and West Germany noting this
trend could only be stopped if the
super powers agreed on defense
cuts.

By ROBERT HIPPLER
The recent student protests in
Ghana were more a demonstra-
tion of independence than an ex-
pression of anti-Americanism,
Miss Georgianna Shine said yes-
terday.
Miss Shine, who has just re-
turned from two years' service
with the Peace Corps in Ghana,
said that "the demonstrations were
initiated more by government
propaganda than 'by sentiment
among the people."
The student demonstrations were
part of an outburst of anti-
American, self-determinist senti-
ment which three weeks ago re-
sulted in the deportation of Uni-
versity Prof. William B. Harvey
of the Law School and five oth-
er college professors.
Student Apologies
Miss Shine noted that Ghanaian
students stopped her on the street
to apologize for the seemingly ag-
gressive and hostile actions initiat-
ed by their government, explaining
that their leader, Prime Minister
Johnson Hits
Policy Critics
MIAMI BEACH f') - President
Lyndon B. Johnson delivered last
night the first all-out political
speech since he took over the
White House, declaring that "the
Presidency is no place for a timid
soul or a torpid spirit."
The chief executive spoke to
fellow Democrats at a party rally.
He made no direct mention of pos-
sible Republican opponents for the
Presidency.

students from many of the nine
tribes of Ghana. But students from
the same tribe tended to cling to-
gether because of cultural and
lingual barriers, she noted.
"The fact that Kwame Nkru-
mah says openly that he considers
himself 'first a Ghanaian, then a
Ghain (his tribe),' is a great fac-
tor aiding nationalism in Ghana,"
Miss Shine said.
Communist Influence
The one-party state in Ghana
is subject to appreciable Com-
munist influence, from both inside
and outside.
"This influence, however, tends
to be counter-balanced by ele-
ments to the right," so that
Nkrumah's government appears in
no danger of Communist domina-
tion, she said.
The attitude of pan-Africanism
noted by Miss Shine in Ghana is
also present in other African coun-
tries, including the Arab-oriented
state of Tunisia. Tunisian Peace
Corps director, Philip Graham, de-
scribing the situation there, noted
that those supporting African uni-
ty tend to conflict with those fav-
oring Arab unity, with both draw-
ing large support from the citizen-
ry.
Testing
Graham, Miss Shine and sever-
al other Peace Corps personnel and
returned volunteers will be on
campus Saturday afternoon, which
will be the last day of campus
Peace Corps Week.

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
the U.S. & occasionally Canada. Suc-
cessful exper. in work requiring dynam-
ic public speaking required. Age 30-50.
Muhlenberg Hospital, Plainfield, N.J.
--Seeking Physical Therapist. Degree
Phys. Ther. Some hops. exper. pref. but
not essential. Meet qualifications for
registration.
SManagement Consultants in Ill. -
Client firm seeking Life Actuary. Firm
is Chicago area life insurance co. De-
gree with major in math essential.
working toward Assoc. & Fellowship in
Society of Actuaries. Exper. in life in-
surance operations with 3-5 yrs. as spe-
cialist in life actuarial duties.
United Community Services of St.
Joseph County, Ind.-Position open in
Community Planning Div. Seeking man
with BA degree & preferably a MA de-
gree, Some bkgd. in social science desir-
able. Concern for community problems
essential.
Helmac Products Corp., Flint, Mich.-
1) Executive Secretary-grad of Bus.
Ad. pref. Must have shorthand & typ-
ing. Retail sales helpful. Must have
exper. in business letter writing. 2)
Man with Bus. Ad. degree. Co. is
growing & almost every avenue into the
business is open-i.e., such fields as
advertising, sales promotion, sales, ac-
counting. Must have completed military
service.
John Fluke Mfg. Co., Inc., Seattle,
Wash.--Seeking man who as company's
Chief Engnr. or as its Dir. of Res. &
Dev. will be responsible for all the
dev. phases of product effort including
the supporting research. Company is a
manufacturer of precision electronic in-
struments. Must have broad & solid
trng. in scientific fundamentals & spe-
cialization in electrical circuit analysis
& synthesis. PhD degree required. In-
dust. exper. of about 10 yrs.
For further information, please call
General Div., Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB, Ext. 3544.

MISS GEORGIANNA SHINE
Kwame Nkrumah, saw the actions
as necessary for the nation's po-
sition and image.
Miss Shine noted that "Nkru-
mah, though many have criticized
him for his methods, has acted
as a powerful and progressive lead-
er for the people of Ghana."
Nkrumah's leadership is also
channeled into the area of pan-
Africanism, she added. "He has
attended many conferences of Af-
rican leaders striving toward uni-
ty, and the people seem to favor
his policies in this matter.-
Conflicting Loyalties

The Ghanaians, like all Afri- The Corps will continue to ad-
cans, experience a conflict be- minister non-obligatory question-
tween tribal and national or supra- naires and aptitude tests at 9
national loyalties, Miss Shine said. a.m., 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. today and
Her Ghanaian school contained 9 a.m. and noon tomorrow.
U, -

On Campus Interviews Mar. 10

Princess Anne Protest

OUR BUILDING IS SOLD

T

WE MUST MOVE!!
To Make Our Task Lighter
WE ARE HAVING A SALE
NEXT
WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY-FRIDAY
March 4 March 5 March 6
DRAPERY AND UPHOLSTERY FABRICS
ALL YOURS AT LO-0-0-0-0-W PRICES!
FABRICS FOR INTERIORS

504 E. Liberty

NO 3-1311

-Associated Press
THREE-POINT PROTEST-State police carry off protester in
Princess Anne, Md., where 27 Negro Maryland State College stu-
dents were arrested and 59 received medical treatment after
demonstrations for integrated restaurants.

And games. And talking-horses. It's all
in a day's work. Because our engineers
are in the business of thinking up, per-
fecting and producing first-of-their-
kind toys like Chatty Cathy@-the doll
that really talks-prized possession of
more than 5 million little girls. Produc-
ing her, and hundreds of other sophis-
ticated toys and games, has seen our
industrial engineers solve lots of first-
of-their-kind problems, too-using jigs
and fixtures in highly original line lay-
outs to provide volume production, yet
assure opportunity for continual prod-
uct improvement.
Maybe you're a man who like noth-
ing better than finding ways to make
things simpler, better and cheaper. If
so, you'll find our business stimulating,
rewarding and loaded with potential.
Because your brand of talent has
helped us grow so fast we've become
the biggest toymaker around, with no
end to expansion in sight. That's why
we're substantially expanding-our
already sizeable engineering staff,
again, during the next twelve months.
We work near the Los Angeles Inter-
national Airport and raise our fwmilies
in the pleasant beach and valley com-
munities nearby. If you think you'd
like to join us - in manufacturing, R&D
or administration-make an appoint-
ment today to see our interviewer, on
campus.

WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP:
Allocate $17 Billion for Defense

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Senate
voted yesterday to authorize $17
billion for missiles, aircraft, ships
and research after solidly reject-
ing an effort to knock out $52 mil-
lion the Pentagon says it won't
spend to develop a new bomber.

Meanwhile, in London, the
House of Commons was approving
a record defense budget after a
sharp debate on nuclear policy, an
important issue in the election
campaign.
* * *
WASHINGTON - An effort to

7w RVIRGINIAN
RESTAURANT

-1

have the Senate judiciary com-
mittee consider the House-passed h
civil rights bill on a "strictly
limited" basis was blocked yester-
day by the committee chairman,
Sen. James O. Eastland (M-Miss).
Senate Majority Leader Mike
Mansfield (D-Mont) proposed that
the 10-point measure be sent to - 545
the judiciary committee with in-:-' }
structions that it report the bill
back to the Senate without recom-
mendation and without amend- c
- /rpment. f
NEW YORK-The stock market
yesterday celebrated only momen-
tarily the $11.5 billion tax cut
and then slipped down to a small
loss in moderate trading. Dow
Jones averages showed 20 rail-
roads up .04, 30 industrials down
2.34, 15 utilities down .48 and 65
stocks down .63.

SZL

*e ?ATY CATHY" IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK
OWNED SY MATEL INC.

State St. on Campus

Phone NO 3-3441

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