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February 18, 1964 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-02-18

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1964

THE. MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1964 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PA~4E

Thant

To

Try

Resolving

SDispute in Mediterranean'I

UN Chief
To Propose
Plan Today
Expected To Contain
Formula for Peace
UNITED NATIONS (f)-Secre-
tary-General U Thant stepped in-
to the explosive Cyprus situation
yesterday with his own plan for
' resolving the problem.
This was reported by diplomatic
'r sources as the United Nations Se-
curity Council-at Thant's sugges-
tion-postponed until this after-
noon any substantive debate over
the situation.
Thant went into a private hud-
dle with United States Undersec-
retary of State George W. Ball
after the Council agreed to the
postponement. Ball came here
from Washington, where he told
President Lyndon B. Johnson ear-
lier that a settlement is essential
to world peace.
Memorandum
The diplomatic sources said
rhant presented a memorandum to
the representatives of Cyprus, Tur-
key, Greece, the United States and
Britain.
It contained Thant's formula
for setting up a peace force to be
sent to Cyprus, machinery for me-
diating any further troubles, and
for paving the way for a perma-
nent settlement.
The sources declined comment
on the details but Thant is known
to be insisting upon prior agree-
ment among Cyprus, Britain,
Greece and Turkey on the terms
for composition of the force. He
wants also agreement on the fi-
nancing and commander for a
force of possibly 10,000 men-
Agree to Postponement
Both Cyprus and Britain agreed
to the surprise move for a post-
ponement of the council debate.
The Council met briefly amid
reports of fresh troubles on Cy-
prus and a new alert to Turkish
and military naval units. Efforts
were concentrated on preventing
Turkey and Greece, partners in
NATO, from coming to blows over
the Mediterranean island republic.
In London, Duncan Sandys, the
Commonwealth relations secretary,
told the House of Commons Brit-
ain has protested strongly to Cy-
prus against a flow of arms into
the country. He said the imports
were arriving with full knowledge
and approval of the Cyprus goV-
ernment.
Senate Leaders
Deny Rights Deal
WASHINGTON (MP) - The civil
rights bill arrived in the Senate
yesterday, along with denials from
Democratic and Republican lead-
ers that any deals have been made
to water it down to head off a
Southern filibuster.

Soo Need
More Acute,
Report Says
WASHINGTON (P) -The na-
tions shortage of public school'
classrooms became more acute this
academic year, after two years of
improvement, the office of educa-
tion said yesterday.
Reports from the states showed
there was a shortage of 124,300
public school classrooms at the be-
ginning of the school year last fall,
the office said.
This was an increase of 3000
from the estimated shortage of
121,200 in the fall of 1962. The
1961 figure was 127,300, down from
142,500 in 1960. The 1959 figure
had been 135,300.
"A substantial classroom short-
age for even one year short-
changes the education of millions!
>f children," said Secretary of Wel-
fare Anthony J. Celebrezze.
"To permit this shortage to con
tinue year after year short chang-
es this nation's future," he added.

SPECIAL TRAINING:
Hershey Urges Induction
Ofoung Drft Rejects

WASHINGTON (M) - The Di-
rector of Selective Service sug-
gested yesterday that thousands
of young men rejected for mili-
tary service should be inducted
and given rehabilitation treatment
Cambodia Gets
Chinese Help
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (R)-
Diplomatic circles Monday ex-
pressed concern about Cambodia's
decision to build two jet bases
near the borders of Thailand and
South Viet Nam with Red China's
help.
One base would be at Svay
Rieng, about 60 miles southeast of
this capital and little more than
60 miles west of Saigon, South
Viet Nam's capital. Svay Rieng is
about three miles from the border.

a
tr
w
Pr
tr
fe
a
la
w
g
tr
r
W
m
of
02
se
g
hi
t
w
T

nd training under military con-
rol.
Lt. Gen. Lewis B. Hershey ad-
anced this proposal even as a new
grogram was being inaugurated
with the aim of channeling draft
ejectees into employment and
raining opportunities through re-
erral to employment offices.
President Lyndon B. Johnson
nnounced the referral program
last month and its initial phase
was put into operation today. Be-
inning July 1, all draft law regis-
rants will be examined upon
eaching age 18 to determine
whether they meet the physical,
mental and educational standards
f the Armed Forces. Until July 1
inly 23-year-olds called up for
ervice will come under the pro-
ram.
Hershey expressed belief that
his proposal for induction for up
o two years of special training
would not require new legislation.
The men inducted under it would
e in addition to the regular draft
alls filled for the Armed Services.
The costs would be charged to the
roposed war on poverty rather
han to the military budget.
Hershey said that what he en-
visioned would be one step beyond
he proposed voluntary Youth
Corps, and would be under mili-
ary control. He said there may
be some opposition on grounds the
program would be a step toward
universal military training.

AFL Backs
Wheat .Plan
Of Dockers
MIAMI BEACH (P) - AFL-CIO
President George Meany strongly
endorsed yesterday a threatened
longshoremen's boycott of United
States wheat shipments to Russia,
but promised to help President
Lyndon B. Johnson try to resolve
the dispute.
Meany said he would "approve
any measure" including a boycott
to insure that at least 50 per cent
of the wheat is shipped on United
States vessels.
But he added that President
Johnson personally asked his co-
operation "and I agreed to try to
find a settlement."
Presidential Phone Call
Meany, at a news conference
after the opening of the AFL-
CIO's annual Executive Council
meeting, said Johnson called him
Sunday.
Meany blamed the wheat blow-
up on the Administration's failure
to live up to previous promises to
ship half the grain on American
vessels.
"The grain interests prefer not
to ship any of the wheat in Ameri-
can ships because it is cheaper to
ship in foreign ships," Meany said.
Reynolds Arrives
Meany noted the hurried trip of
Assistant Secretary of Labor
James J. Reynolds here from
Washington and said:
"Reynolds is here to try to settle
it and I'm going to try to help
him."
But Meany emphasized that he
fully backs the position of the
AFL-CIO's Maritime Trades De-
partment which refused to budge
an inch on the 50-50 shipping re-
quirement.
Earlier, President Thomas W.
Gleason of the International
Longshoremen's Association said
he had sent telegrams ordering a
halt to the loading of Soviet-
bound wheat on two foreign flag
ships at New Orleans and one at
Houston.

SECRET OPERATIONS:
Wallace Conducts
Civil Rights Probe

MONTGOMERY - An intelli-
gence network of sta.te agencies
and officials is amassing informa-
tion on people concerned with civil
rights at the direction of Alabama
Governor George C. Wallas, the
New York Times reported recently.
The network's components,
which generally have only inform-
al ties with one another, some-
times work openly. Far more fre-
quently, however, their activities
and the results are secret.
Their interest extends beyond.
Alabamans, giving considerable
attention to Negro leaders, justice
department officials, newsmen and
others who have come into the
state during racial crises.
Unparalleled in Country
In this racial aspect the opera-
tion is similar to those found in
Mississippi and Louisiana, while
in terms of over-all scope and
amount of activity the intelligence
network seems to be unparalleled
in this country.
Nevertheless, the investigations
alone have served as a means of
intimidation in some cases, the
Times asserts. A tape recording,
made by two state investigators,
resulted in the expulsion of Negro
student Jimmy A. Hood from the
University of Alabama, after he
won admission under a Federal
court order.
Subversive Unit
The more active organizations
are the Subversive Unit of the De-
partment of Public Safety's Inves-
tigative and Identification Divi-
sion, the Alabama Legislative
Commission to Preserve the Peace
and the Alabama Sovereignty

Commission. There is also a loose-
ly-knit group of listening posts ex-
tending into every county, which
has been described by the Birm-
ingham News as "a political spy
network "
The Subversive Unit said that.
57 dossiers on individuals had
been set up during the fiscal year
ended last October and that ma-
terial had been added to 255 al-
ready in existence.
The purpose of these files ac-
cording to the commander of the
Investigative. and Identification
Division, is to "try to keep up with
people in the state of Alabama
who are apt to cause us trouble.
Those are people who have been
involved in racial disturbances."
According to the annual report
there were 35 files' added to an
existing 45 files of news clippings
of persons, groups or organizations
active in racial disturbances or
subversive activities. In addition,
files have been established on re-
ports from the House Committee
on Un-American Activities, and
on demonstrations and meetings
held by racial or subversive
groups.
EU ROPE

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World News RoundupP
j~t
By The Associated Press bloody bombing of an American v
GUANTANAMO BAY - The movie theater, ambushing three t
commander of the Guantanamo American military men In a gren- C
Naval Base met Cuba's charges ade attack. t
of water-stealing head-on yester- To cope with the rising tide ofb
day-he cut the big pipe which Red terror in this capital, United u
once carried water into this post. States and Vietnamese officials _
Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Cas- formed a joint security council tor
tro shut off the water supply provide greater safety for Ameri-
February 6 in protest against the cans. « « *
arrest of Cuban fishermen in Unit- BRUSSELS-One of the world's
ed States waters off Florida. Rear
Adm. John D. Bulkeley countered great art treasures-the painting
this charge yesterday by ordering "Negroes' Heads" by the Flemish
the pipeline severed. artist Peter Paul Rubens - was
stolen early yesterday from the
« « °Brussels Museum of Ancient Art.
DALLAS-Jack Ruby's lawyers Painted in the 17th century, its
tried in vain yesterday to kill the value was placed at about $1 mil-
case against him at its very out- lion.
set. They claimed insanity makes * * *
him unfit to stand trial for the NEW YORK-The New York
murder of President John F. Ken- Stock Exchange reported averages
nedy's accused assassin. No start reached record heights yesterday.
was made at picking a jury. Dow Jones Averages showed 30 in-
*0* dustrials up 1.81, 20 railroads up
SAIGON - Terrorists struck 0.77, 15 utilities up 0.53, and 65
quickly again yesterday after a stocks up 0.45.
k $
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