100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 02, 1964 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-02-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

rr U W M'S V IS Vd"- AL IVT Th AL W T IIV

A ANDt A' Ml VA1. UE'4A ~i' -wt a w ..

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1964

Krenek Discusses Tone Style

By JEFFREY K. CHASE

5

I

ARTS AND LETTERS:
Ehrling Likes Baroque,
Contemporary Music

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS

Ernst Krenek is a short, stocky
man with a healthy Southern Cal-
ifornia tan and an alert, sensi-
tive mind.
One of the most prolific com-
posers of this century, Krenek is
in Ann Arbor as guest conductor
and lecturer for the fourth an-
nual Contemporary Music Festi-
val. Saturday before his perform-
lance he discussed the twelve-
tone technique of musical com-
position, which he adapted to his
own personal style in the early
1950's.
"The creative trend in music is
oriented toward the twentieth
century Viennese school, that of
Schoenberg, Berg, and Webern;
but especially toward Webern," he
said.
Technically Simple
"It is Webern who reduces mu-
sic to its essentials and whose mu-
sic is technically simple to the
point of being austere, the com-
posers of today take as their mod-
el," Krenek continued.
Krenek explained that until the
end of World War II, the United
States knew little about the
twelve-tone school. But during the
war, when many composers sought
refuge in America, and after the
war, when correspondence be-
tween the United States and Eu-
rope increased, American compos-
ers became much more aware of
music other than nineteenth cen-
tury romantic.
Serial Method
Most composers who adopt the9
serial method of composition do
so only on their own terms. "In
my works in this technique,"1
Krenek pointed out, "I have sim-
ultaneously developed a certain
type of manipulation of the tones
in the series which I call 'rota-j
tion.' It involves the changing of
position of the tones according to ;
certain systematic-not random-
principles."1
And why does the public find1
serial music difficult to listen to?1
It is "basically because of the
lack of clearcut and easily recog-
nizable themes," Krenek, whoI
taught composition at the Univer-I
sity during the summers .of 1939t
and 1940, concluded.c

Special To The Daily
DETROIT - "Is the art of con-
ducting something one can culti-
vate?" Sixten Ehrling, the recently
appointed music director and con-
ductor of the Detroit Symphony
Orchestra, queriedrback stage in
Ford Auditorium recently.
"Almost everybody is born with
the ability to do this." (He moved
his hands in a common beating
pattern.) "The conductor's pri-
mary task is to learn music, and
learning music-which can be cul-
tivated-is a job which requires
much hard work," Swedish-born
Ehrling explained,
Ehrling mentioned that many
people ask him what changes he
will make in the orchestra. Re-
garding programming he said, "I
can't tell exactly what I shall do.
I know that I want to schedule the
best of the contemporary music,
and by 'contemporary' I mean
music written during the 20th cen-
tury. But I am also very interested
m Baroque music. I will not favor
Swedish music, but schedule it as
I would any other."
Likes Contemporary Music
Ehrling explained that, perhaps
because of his relatively young age
(he is 45 years old), he is expected
to be interested in contemporary
music. Fortunately he is. "But just
because I am interested in modern
music does not mean that I have
to like all of it; it just means that
I desire to know what people are
doing.

Stockholm in 1960, has recently
been guest conducting throughout
the world.
He will spend the latter half of
this month in Sweden for the cele-
bration of the 50th anniversary of
the founding of the Stockholm
Philharmonic Orchestra and then
will return to Detroit for the re-
mainder of the season.

TWELVE-TONE TECHNIQUE-Ernst Krenek, guest conductor for
the fourth annual Contemporary Music Festival, demonstrates
his twelve-tone technique which he adopted to his personal style
early in the 1950's.
CITIZEN'S APPROVAL:
Hatcher Asks Renewal
Of Delta MergerPlan

MONDAY, FEB. 31
4:15 p.m.-Prof. David Gottlieb
of Michigan State University will
speak on "Race Relations: On
Research with Negro Adolescents
and Teachers" in the Social Work
Aud.
8 p.m.-Prof. Elzada Clover of
the botany department will speak
on "Interesting Plants of North-
ern Michigan" in the West Con-
ference Rm. of Rackham.
8:30 p.m.-Members of the mu-
sic school faculty will perform in
the third concert of the Contem-
porary Music Festival in Rackham
Aud. Among those performing will
be Professors Jerome Jelinek, cel-
lo; Nelson Hauenstein, flute; John
McCollum, tenor; and Eugene Bos-
sart, piano.
TUESDAY, FEB. 4
3 p.m. - J. Campbell Bruce,
journalist and author, will speak
on "Uncovering the Scandal of
Alcatraz" in Rackham Aud.
7:30 p.m.-Prof. Lionel Laing of
the political science department
will speak on the "Political Im-
age of Canada" in the Multi-
purpose Rm. of the UGLI.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 5
7:30 p.m.-Prof. David Stewart
of the English department will
speak on the "Cultural Image of
Canada" in the Multipurpose Rm.
of the UGLI.
7:30 p.m.-Voice Political Par-
ty, the University chapter of Stu-
dents for a Democratic Society,
will hold an open meeting for
elections and the semester pro-
gramming in Rm. 3R of the Mich-
igan Union.
8 p.m.-Rabbi Irwin Groner of
Detroit will speak on "Jesus and
the Jews of His Time" at the
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation.
This is the third in a series of
lectures on "The Jews and Jesus."
8:30 p.m. - The University
Chamber Orchestra, conducted by

Prof. Gilbert Ross of the music
school, will be heard in a pro-
grom of "Music for Chamber
Orchestra and Chamber Ensem-
bles" as- the fourth program of
the Contemporary Music Festival
in Rackham Aud.
THURSDAY, FEB. 6
8 p.m. - Rep. Stanley Thayer
(R-Ann Arbor) will speak on "The
University and the Legislature"
in the East Conference Rm. of
Rackham.
FRIDAY, FEB. 7
7:30 p.m. - The International
Students Association will present

Keith Shackleton leading an eve-
ning of folk music from Canada
at the International Center.
8:30 p.m-The University Sym-
phony Orchestra, Prof. Josef Blatt
og the music school conducting,
will be heard in the fifth' con-
cert of the Contemporary Music
Festival in Rackham Aud.
SUNDAY, FEB. 9
8:30 p.n.-The University Mu-
sical Society will present the
Sahm-Chun-Li Dancers and Mu-
sicians from Seoul, Korea as the
sixth program in the Chamber
Arts Series in Rackham Aud.

g

limmmll

m

STUDENTS and FACULTY
Dial 662-8871 for,
Program Information

I

I

B

(Continued from Page 1)
from the start to follow, without
interruption, courses of study lead-
ing from the freshman year
through the senior level.
"Because of a unified adminis-
tration and an integrated faculty
which would be able to teach
courses on all levels, the _student
would be amply prepared one year
for courses in the next year with-
out a dislocation of . standards or
sequence."
Besides seeking to establish a
branch at Delta, the University
has sought to expand its Flint
branch-which only provides in-
struction at the junior, senior and
graduate levels as of now-to a
full four-year institution. This
plan has also met with varying
degrees of opposition, but Presi-
dent Hatcher said the University

JOHN HERSEY

continues to remain interested:

in

expansion away from Ann Arbor
as a means of accommodating

Administrators Brief Alumi

more students. "Although I like much contem-
"The University must do its part porary music, electronic music has
to meet the enrollment pressures not yet given me anything of great
ahead," he said yesterday. The value. One must, however, wait
admissions office has announced and see how it develops before
that applications for next year's definitive judgment can be made.
freshman class are already run- "It seems that certain trends in
ning 25 per cent ahead of last contemporary music have gone too
year. Next September's class marks far. Many composers are making
the arrival of the first crop of music too complicated when they
"war babies" over which educators really don't have to. Why, trying
have been worrying for so long, to read some of this new music is
Earlier in the day, Vice-Presi- like trying to read a novel in an
dent for Academic Affairs Roger alphabet constructed especially for
W. Heyns indicated that the Uni- only that one work.
versity intends to increase its Originality and Progress
freshman class size by 700 in "Itig natnogri
September. He indicated that the . it is not that.I object to orig-
addedstudets wuld al be i nality and progress, I only object
added students would all be in- to works written out of insincerity
state. and primarily for the purpose of
showing off the composer's sup-
posed intelligence," Ehrling added.
mi O l U, He noted that he will try to
serve contemporary music gently
to the Detroit audience and not
City) called the program "en- force it upon them. "It is not im-
City caled te prgram"en portant for me to make them un-
lightening. I gained a much broad- derstand it, only to like it."
er prospective." Traxler said the Ehrling feels that a good con-
governor's budget doesn't go far ductor must have operatic exper-
enough, in his opinion, and prom- ience because it is only in opera
ised he would make a strong try work, in which the pace is so
to boost the recommended figure.. compelling, that the conductor can
Rep. Carl O. Little (R-Sagi- gain the necessary experience for
naw) said the program was "good his craft.
and useful." He refused to com- And, too, Ehrling knows of only
mit himself to a boost in educa- very few operatic productions in
tion spending, however. "I know which there were no situations to
the colleges are doing all they offer an excellent opportunity for
can, but the question is where forcing the conductor to develop a
you're going to get the extra good sense of how to deal with the
money.'' " unexpecter during a performance.
Sen. William J. Leppien (R- Stockholm Orchestra
Saginaw) called the program "val- Ehrling, who resigned from the
uable" but said he hadn't had past of permanent director of the
time to study the governor's rec- Royam Opera and Orchestra in
ommendations yet.
Ii

PTP To Begin
Dramatization
Of Hersey Play
The Professional Theatre Pro-
gram of the University will begin
rehearsals for "The Child Buy-
er" by John Hersey.
The play, which is the revised
dramatization of Hersey's novel
of the same name, has been
adapted by Paul Shyre for per-
formance March 3-8. Shyre, who
has also adapted Sean O'Casey's
"Pictures in the Hallway" and
"U.S.A." by John Dos Passos, will
attend the final rehearsals.
Hersey, who won the Pulitzer
Prize for his novel "A Bell for
Adano," will be presenthfor the
performances. This is the third
novel of Hersey's to be performed
on the stage, following "A Bell for
Adano" and "The Wall."
Director Marcella Cisney of the
Professional Program was formerly
with a nationwide television net-
work and directed opera with the
New York City Center.
The "Child Buyer" is a part of
the New Play Project of the Pro-
fessional Theatre Program whose
purpose is, according to Miss Cis-
ney, to create an original produc-
tion at the University each year.
Miss Cisney explained that aft-
er showing interest in the Thea-
tre program at the University,
Hersey offered the adaptation of
his novel to the University where
he felt it conuld be done with in-
tegrity, prior to a possible pro-
duction on the New York stage.

(Continued from Page 1)

held our own until now, but weI
have expanded beyond our re-]

student. "You may think $9.9 mil-
lion is a lot of money to spend on
one building (the Dental School),
but that's the kind of money that
must be spent in order to pro-
vide necessary facilities."
The new Music Bldg., to be
opened this summer, falls between
the two above extremes. Physical
plant costs run to $4000 per stu-
dent with space for 1000 stu-
dents.
Vice-President Heyns drew a
picture of various components of
the University: faculty, students
and curricula. Referring to the
faculty he said that the Univer-
sity "is constantly being bombard-
ed with raids from other institu-
tions."
Two Assets
When this competition began,
in the last decade, the Univer-
sity had two assets according to
Heyns: "a loyal faculty and a
good salary schedule. We have:

sources and these assets are at
an end. It is terribly important
that we make a big move in the
next couple of months."
Over the past seven years, the
state Legislature has provided the
University with roughly $50 mil-
lion less than the sum of its
budget requests. In that time the
faculty salary level has dropped
from the top three or four in the
country to twentieth. ,
Heyns found students "highly
internationally minded and much
more involved in political, socio-
economic problems" than' previ-
ously. He said he was concerned,
however, over "quite a preoccupa-
tion with grades. This is partly
our fault. We have placed too
much emphasis on the superficial
signs of academic achievement."
Applying his own version of
explained that for every dollar to
educate a freshman or sophomore,
$3-4.00 is spent on juniors and
seniors, $5.00 is spent on MA can-
didates and $6.00 is spent in the
graduate-professional programs.
'U' Image
University officials are con-
cerned that the state at large does
not understand why the Univer-
sity's expenses are so great when
compared with other schools. Yes-
terday's program was part of a
massive effort to explain the dif-
fering costs of different programs
and to explain the programs
themselves.
"The presentation contained a
lot of information. I was able to
see for the first time why our
costs are so much higher," Sen.
Dehmel said."
Rep. Robert J. Traxler (D-Bay

i
I
i
i
7
i
f
t
A
j
i

ORGA NIZATION
-- NOTICES
Use of This column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered organizations only.
Organizations who are planning to be
active for the Spring Semester should
be registered by Feb. 7, 1964. Forms
availavle, 1011 Stduent Activities Bldg.
Congregational Disciples E & R, EUB
Student Guild, Sun., Seminar: "Inter-
pretation of the Old Testament," Feb. 2,
8-9 p.m., Guild House, 802 Monroe St.
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student Or-
ganization, 6 p.m. supper, 6:45: Gamma
Delta-National Lutheran Council Stu-
dent Dialogue, Feb. 2, 1511 Washtenaw.
Graduate Outing Club, Hiking, skat-
ing and/or tobogganing, Feb. 2, 2 p.m.,
Rackham-Huron St. Entrance.
Unitarian Student Group, Discussion,
Feb. 2, 7:30 p.m., Unitarian Church,
"Humanism, Part I."
Russian Circle, Coffee, conversation,
Tues., Feb. 4, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze
Bldg.
Pakistan Student Association, Feb. 2,
3 p.m., Pounds House, 3rd General
Body Meeting, Refreshments will be
served at 6' p.m.
Sociedad Hispanica, 3-5 p.m.. 3050
Frieze Bldg.
Le Cercle Francais, Feb. 4, 8 p.m.,
3050 Frieze Bldg.

UNIVERSAL
CITY STUDIOS
.I
.I

DIAL
5-6290
2ND BIG WEEK
'easily one of the most entertaining films
of the year" .
"Charade"t is oflI winner . .. is all fun
"you will have spent a most amusing and
delightful time in the enchanting company
of Audrey Hepburn and Cary Grant
what more can you ask for?"
-Hugh Holland-Mich. Daily
Gr AudreY
Grant .Hepburn

;; .
..,
s';c::
;,
a ::
si:
+ .

Will Be Th
A[AOEMI

We Predicf JON.FS~ ; "
"TOO I .

}I' A

......

' Charade i
A STANLEY DON EN Poducti

-

.................

I4

I

They
ploy it
delightfully
but
dangerously!

............................
----------

.,.:....:::.:.,.
4"titf.8.......a.............f..:::;..".i .

1

APA To Play
In New Yore
The Association of Producing
Artists, the resident professional
theatre company of the Universi-
ty, has signed a one-month con-
'tract with the Phoenix Thea-
tre in New York it was announc-
ed recently.
The APA, a four year old reper-
tory company, has completed its
second year of a three year con-
tract with the University. They
will be seen at the Phoenix, be-
ginning on March 4, in a reper-
tory of four productions: Piran-
dello's "Right You Are (If You
Think You Are)," Moliere's "Sca-
pin," Gorki's "The Lower Depths"
and George M. Cohan's "The Tav-
ern," all of which have been per-
formed at the University.

Would You Like to Read and Speak
MODERN HEBREW ?
STUDENTS MAY STILL REGISTER
FOR HILLEL'S CLASSES
Phone 3-4129 or come for details

MEIR-O-DWYMAYER present;
PAUL NEWMAN

I

r-

HAWAII TOUR
SIX UNIVERSITY CREDITS
57 DAYS.$....549 - auax
Attend University of Hawaii Summer Ses.
sion and earn college credits while enjoy-
ing beautiful Hawaii with the nationally
popular Howard Tour - the program in
which you "live in" and enjoy Hawaii -
not just see it; the tour in which you
personally participate in the very best of
island living, not just hear about it.
Tour price includes roundtrip jet thrift
flights between California and Hawaii,
campus residence, and the most diversified
itinerary of the highest quality and largest
number of dinners, parties, shows, and
cruises, sightseeing, beach activities, and
cultural events; plus all necessary tour
services.
Waikiki apartments and steamship passage
are available at adjusted tour rates. Also
available, optional tours to neighbor'
islands.
ORIENT TOUR
SIX UNIVERSITY CREDITS
44 DAYS........1989
Hawaii, Japan, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Philip-
pines, Thailand, Singapore -- fabled names
you've dreamed about - all in a single
escorted program for sophisticated' trav-
elers whose intellect, adventurous spirit,
ad previous travelhto other moreacces-
sible areas mak~e them ready for one of
the most exciting and pleasurable of all
travel experiences on earth. If you desire,
you may also enroll in the San Francisco
State College Summer Session courses
offered in conjunction with this program.
Pricq includes roundtrip air travel between
West Coast and Orient, plus all first class
and luxury services ashore-hotels, meals,
sightseeing, all tips, and the most exten-
sive schedule of special dinners, cosmopol-
itan entertainment, evening events, and
social functions; plus all necessary tour
services. ,,,,, ~

B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation

1429 Hill St.

1'

.....

From.I1 O'clock
TODAY
Continuous

LP-,w CAMPUS

DIAL
8-64 16

"A MOVIE GEM
So Damned Funny at
Times That You Laugh
Until You Cry! An Extremely
Superior British Film. Able
To Compete on Any 10 Best
List of the World This Year!"
-N.Y. Post

NEW CAREER FRONTIER

HE
or
a
mi
kis
a
gir
an
ph
ply
a
nig
of
dai

die
;se
d

Jred

edli.!

I

4

Ilk

. e

in Israel

FELLOWSHIP
For Graduates in Industrial Engineering
and Business Administration
Are you receiving your Bachelor or
Masters Degree in Industrial Engineer-
ing or Business Administration in 1964?
If so..
This fellowship program offers you on-
the-job experience in diversified industrial
problems, valuable experience in foreign
markets, and the adventure of working in
a dynamic, progressive country.
While employed, special arrangements are
-made for you to pursue post graduate
studies leading to a MSc or Dsc degree at
the. Technion-Institute of Technology-
at Haifa.
LOCAL INTERVIEWS
WILL BE CONDUCTED BY ISRAELI
representative in the near future. To
arrange an appointment in your schooL

0
jhtmare
nger!3 :

APPLY
Ure onnDnffnr

the bold new book
in love and suspense!

&ostarring
tmI ERI r A. .. mWm N 1.

I

I m-r. 7 w- -= d' fl..

r^ . ..

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan