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August 20, 1969 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1969-08-20

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Wednesday, August 20, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Wednesday, August 20, 1969 THE MICHiGAN DAILY Page Three

RADICAL FILM SERIES
presents
AGIT-POP
105
A film by Norman Fruchter and John Douglas
Distributed by NEWSREEL
-Draft Resistance organizing in Boston
-A Boston organizer's trip to North Vietnam
-A G.l1. coffee house in Texas
-Newsreel's appearanceion Channel 13 in N.Y.
-Production of THE RAT'S special issue in Chicago
-Chicago during the Democratic Convention-the
planning and carrying out of five days of protest
Each section focuses on an organizer central to each project-
the attemptis to define the nature of commitment to "the Move-
ment" against a backdrop of last summer's activity.
WednesdayAug. 20 7-8-9-10-11 p.m.
Admission 50c
CANTERBURY HOUSE 330 Maynard

Hippies move to oust
Sand City government,

SAND CITY, Calif. (P)-Voters'
flocked to the single polling booth
in tiny Sand City yesterday as both
sides predicted victory in a hippie-
inspired recall election to oust
business-minded city leaders.
Bob Lynn, bearded leader of the
movement to recall the mayor and
four-man City Council of this sea-
side town of 520 persons on scenic
Monterey Bay, faced a challenge
to his own vote.
City Attorney John B. Stohlton
said, "There's some question of
whether Lynn lives here . . or in
Pacific Grove, about three miles
away."
A spokesman said Lynn has a
lease on a home in Sand City and
is eligible to vote.
During the first three hours the

single polling booth was open in
the town's three-room City Hall,
50 persons-or nearly 30 per cent
of the town's 180 eligible voters---
cast their ballots.E
Mayor Phil Calabrese, a wealthy
contractor who has headed the city
government for nine of the 10
years it has been incorporated,
claimed hippies were trying to turn
Sand City into a "new narcotics
terminal for the country."
Lynn. a 44-year-old former pot-
tery teacher, denied that narcotics
is the issue. He says the city has
no low-cost housing and no re-
creation and park facilities. He
rlaunched the recall campaign last
February.
Stohlton said 32 other votes
would be challenged-primarily of
hipipies-on grounds that they do
not meet residency requirements.
He said he expected "somewhere
around 20 to 25 hippies" would
vote.
"The established residents in
town look on the hippies as a real
threat," he said, "and they want
to get them out of here. I think
you could call it a clash between
the establishment and the hippie,
community."
r etio i vmoerna ~ooling
DIAL 5-6290
TODAY at 1:30 and 8 P.M.

GIRLS! DO YOU
DARE
AfAT!IIIIL H rEE

Program Information 662-6264 WATCH WF
DID WITH THEIR BABY
AFTER THE AFFAIR WAS OVER?

MAT HE

ENDING TONIGHT
"THE LAST TIME"
and
f"SINFUL DAVEY"
* THURSDAY
"NOW I'VE SEEN
EVERYTHING'
-Beverly Hills Courier

TODAY LADIES 75c until 6 P.M.
What made you leave him, Cathy...
was it thevt he made love, or why?

-Associated Press
Nixon on the links
President Nixon shows his newly appointed ambassadors his golf
swing after their session yesterday at the Western White House
in San Clemente, California. Next to Nixon from left to right are
Taylor G. Relcher, Peru; Leonard C. Meeker, Romania; Walter L.
Rice, Australia and Luther I. Replogle, Iceland. Two other appoin-
tees not pictured here are Eileen R. Donovan, Barbados and
Adolph W. Schmidt, Canada.
. .. - - t~Sl .Vf P~~
DAILY,' OFFICIAL BULLETIN
v,::":}5:::Y:::":' :x'i ;: Y'";-: :?,?:;f, ~ri''Y:Y.Ax."..{,:.Y"LT}:'t ,,;S.g, fY,,Y: "V~ii, ,.y ,au+;"

SA.M.P.A.S.;

BEST PICTURE
OF THE YEAR!
"To Miss It is To
Throw Away
Ecstasv!"
-Drew Bogema
Mich. Daily

I

WINNER 6
ACADEMYAWARDS!
Todav Mat. $1.75, Eve. $2.00

Official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in- TYPEWRITTEN f o r mnto
Room 3528 L.S.A. Bldg., before
2 p.m. of the day preceding publi-
cation and by 2 p.m. Fiay for
Saturday and Sunday. General
: Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices a r el
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270
Day Calendar
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20
University Summer Choir - Thomas
Hilbish, conductor: Hill Auditorium,,
8:00 P.M.

(COUNT TlfE POSSIBILITIES)
Distributed By Cannon Releasing Corporation

Subscribe To
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41

or

Grade Sheets for Spring-Summer &
Summer, 1969 have been sent to de-
partments for distribution to instruc-
tors. All grade sheets should be sub-
mitted within four days of the exam-
ination, no later than Thursday, Aug-
ust 28 at 5:00 p.m. A grade messenger
service will be provided on a regular
Sbasis by the Office of the Registrar to
departmental offices on the Central
Campus beginning Monday, August 25
and continuing through 5:00 p.m. on
Thursday, August 28. Grades may also
be submitted directly to the Office of
the Registrar at "Window A", L.S. & A.
Building during working hours. Ques-
tions pertaining to grade reports may
Ibe directed to 764-6292.
Student Identification Cards - Any
student identification card marked
Valid Winter 1969 Only or Ann Arbor
Summer Session must be replaced be-
fore the student may register for the
Fall term, 1969. Replacement of this
card may be accomplished by making
application at "Window A" in the
L.S. & A. Building prior to August 29,
1969. Proper notification of the stu-
dent's correct social security number
should be available when application
is made.

All students should check their iden-
tification cards for errors. The first
nine digits of t h e student number
should be equal to the student's social
security number.
If the numbers do not match, the
incorrect card should be brought to
"Window A" L.S. & A. Building for re-
placement. No replacement fee will be
charged.
For the Fall terni registration, Sep-
tember 2 - September 4, all matters
concerning I.D. cards will be handled
in the Lobby of the L.S. & A, Building.
Fall I.D. cards will be distributed at
this location beginning Wednesday,
August 27 through Thursday, Septem-
ber 4 during regular working hours.
Placement Service
GENERAL DIVISION
3200 S.A.B.
Current Positions Received by Gen-
eral Division please call 764-7460 for
further information:
Management Consultants, Detroit -
Sales positions with both technical and
consumer products.
Alphanumeric Inc., Detroit area -
Sales Rep, oil Mich, exper in data pro-
cess sales, graphic arts.
S Young America, Inc, five territories
covering U.S., - Regional Managers,
ambitious young women, college grads.
to manage territories of distributing
organization serving college coeds.
Personal Products Co., Wislington,
Ill. - EDP and engineering positions.
exper necess.
General Foods Corp, Waseca, Minn.-
Mechan. engr.
Systems Research Laboratories, Inc.,
Dayton, Ohio - Physics and engrg. de-
grees, many positions all requiring
exper.
Abbott Laboratories, Chicago, Ill. -
Exper degrees bus. ad., educ, math and
indust. engrg. for positions in manage-
ment training. 11
Eastern News Distributors, Inc., N.Y..
- Student to market here at Michigan,
special interest magazines.

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Srivice
THE GOVERNMENT hinted yesterday it hoped to touch off
a still-controversial underground nuclear' blast at Amehita Is-
land, Alaska on Oct. 15.
There has been speculation that the proposed test is in cpnnec-
tion with efforts to produce warheads for the Safeguard missile de-
fense system.
The Atomic Energy Commission gave the hint of a specific date
in announcing that it is establishing a "safety area" - 50 nautical
mile radius - all around the remote island in the Aleutian Island
chain.
The AEC declared the safety area was being set up in connection
with a period from Sept. 25 through October 15 when heavier than
normal ship and aircraft activities may take place in the area.
VIRGINIA DEMOCRATS yesterday nominated William Bat-
tle in that state's first primary runoff for governor.
Battle, a middle roader who carried the backing of the elected
powers of the party, defeated the more liberal Henry Howell, a state
senator who claimed "the people" were behind him.
The basic issue of the primary was the future structure of the
Democratic party organization. Howells populist-type campaign gave
the party structure its toughest test in 20 years.
A FEDERAL JUDGE yesterday ordered the government to
furnish him with the transcript of a bugged conversation between
a top witness at the trial of Teamsters Union President James
Hoffa and another official convicted with Hoffa.
Walter Sheridan, a former Justice Department investigator, was
the first government witness in the Supreme Court-ordered hearing
into alleged wiretapping and bugging by federal agents during Hoffa's
1964 trial in Chattanooga, Tenn.
Sheridan admitted that a car bugged by the FBI was used by
Baton Rouge, La. Teamsters official Edward Partin. He said a conver-
sation between Partin, a witness against Hoffa, and Edwin King,
another Teamsters official was recorded.
One of King's lawyers asked the court to deliver the transcript
of the recording to the defense.
However, U.S. District Court Judge Frank Wilson, who presided
over the 1964 trial, requested that the transcript be turned over to
him for study before deciding on the request.
$' THE NOMINATION OF CLEMENT HAYNSWORTH to be a
Supreme Court Justice will upset the timetable for Senate action
on a constitutional amendment to overhaul the presidential elec-
tion system.
Sen. James Eastland (D-Mlss), chairman of the Senate Judiciary
Committee, set Sept. 9 for a hearing on Nixon's nomination of Hayns-
worth.
The hearing is set for 11 a.m. which will give the committee time
to meet first in an executive session to vote on three nominations for
the 9th circuit court.' However, proposed amendments to abolish the
electoral college and a bill for limited anti-trust exemption for' joint
newspaper publishing agreements which had been scheduled for that
day will be delayed.,
HUNDREDS OF AMERICAN REINFORCEMENTS poured
into a battle near Da Nang yesterday to relieve two badly battered
U.S. infantry companies.
This was the biggest ground fighting in the north since the North
Vietnamese launched their fall campaign last week.
The two units of 177 troops each ran into an estimated 1200 North
Vietnamese infantryman while sweeping the foothills south of the city.
Six hundred American reinforcements were rushed to their aid with
more to follow.
* * *
THE NATION'S GOVERNORS are being .asked to take a
stand pinning down present policy against any cross-country
flights by the controversial supersonic transport when the air-
liner is developed.
They also are being asked to recommend that the federal gov-
ernment consult with each governor or his representative before any
commercial SST flights take place over any state or territory.
The proposal is contained in a policy statement prepared for ap-
proval at next month's National Governors Conference.
In dealing with the SST currently under review by the Niyon
Administration, the statement acknowledges the project may have
value to further the aerodynamic competence of the United States.
However, it adds "it has not been conyincingly shown that the
advantages to be gained in the operation of supersonic transports
would counterbalance the possible adverse environmental noise ef-
fects to which the citizens of the various states would be subjected."
SOVIET NAVAL STRENGTH in the Mediterranean was per-
haps at a record high yesterday, as U.S. officials speculated over
reasons for the buildup.
A U.S. Navy spokesman said 63 to 65 Soviet ships had been
counted, outnumbering the more powerful U.S. fleet,
Soviet presence in the Mediterranean has not -been this great
since they began' deploying naval forces after the Middle East war
in 1967.
The U.S. officals did not release the number of Soviet submarines

because they say they do not want to let the Russians know how
effective American surveillance is.
ATTORNEYS FOR THE PARENTS OF MARY JO KO-
PECHNE, fighting exhumation of her body, raised new legal
objections yesterday that could delay next week's hearing on an
autopsy request by a Massachusetts district attorney.
Presiding Judge Bernard Brominski of Luzerne County Common
Pleas Court said the Kopechnes' attorneys had presented a motion
that "raised enough legal points" to warrant a conference with Dis-

I1

hvey1
...... . ........
"OTLEY IS WITH IT! AMUSING,
FINE FARE! Wild chases, good photography, neat
scenery, swinging London, and suspense...
everything is here!'-i Smith, Cosmopolitan
"DON'T PASS UP MEETING THIS
BLOKE, OTLEY! Surprisingly fresh, funny,
youthful comedy far different from the rest!"
-William Wolf. Cue Magazine;
"OTLEY PLEASURES ONE GREATLY!
Tom Courtenay is a charmer, wonderfully
ingratiating! Good rhythmic fun!"
-Judith Crist, New York Magazine'
"FRESH AND SOPHISTICATED,
SHEER ENJOYMENT! Director Dick Clement
has filmed a chase sequence that is a classic!"
-Kathleen Carroll, New York Daily News *
"SIT DOWN AND ENJOY YOURSELF!

I

trict Attorney Edmund Dinis.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor.
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning University
year. Subscription rates: $9 by carrier,
$10 by mail.
Summer Session published, Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $2.50 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

Rent your-
Roommate with
a Classified Ad

Tom Courtenay turns up as Otley himself, who exists
on the fringes of London's younger, swinging set!"
-Archer WinstenNew York Post
"OTLEY IS FULL OF LAUGHTER!
A rollicking adventure for Tom Courtenay
and fun for the entire audience!"
-Frances Taylor. Long Island Press
T UMUIRfAAY=TU=ES=
CARL FORIIMI rtsw.
TOM COURTENAY

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