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June 14, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1969-06-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MIDWEST'S
MOTION.PITURE PALACE
presents

second front page

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AMU 41P
711a

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Saturday, June 14, 1969

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

i

NICHOLAS RAY'S
"Party Girl'

7 & 9P.M.

and
FRANK BORZAGE'S
"Till We Meet Again"

P.M.

Monday, June 16
at THE ARK 1

75c
421 Hill Street

NEXT WEEK: CARL DREYER'S "Vampyr!"

Turning off
the falls
The American Falls of Niagara
Falls have been turned off.
The stoppage, of the Falls A .:x
Thursday by the Army Corps of
Engineersmarked the first time...
h that man has diverted the water " \' ' r.r.:
of the Niagara River.
The w a t e r was diverted
through the use of a cofferdam
so geologists can make a six-
month study of the face of the
American falls to determine
what can be done to prevent. .
further damaging rockslides.
The normal flow of 4.5 mil-
lion gallons a minute which
sweeps over the 1100 foot crest
of the falls were diverted to
Canada's n e a r b y Horseshoe
Falls:
The unidentifed bodies of two
« eople who had at sometime :.
been swept in to the falls wer e
recovered when the water flow

A3

Ann Arbor Blues Festival presents:
THE BLUES
a film with

Browny Terry,
fukka White, Jesse

Sonny McGee, Otis Span,
Fuller, Gary Davis, and others.

Monday, June 16
Wednesday, June 18

8:00 P.M.
9:30 P.M.

FREE
UAC-Canterbury House Production

-----

FRIDAY and SATURDAY
Dir. Preston Sturges (1941)
Barbara Slanwyck- Henry Fonda
"Best picture of 1941 "-N.Y. Times
Sturges was the foremost film statirist of the 40's,
the Lubitsch of the bellylaugh.
7& 9 ARCH ITECTURE
662-88,71 7 C AUDITORIUM
Mon., June 16-ARK (1421 Hill) 9:00 75c
Nicholas Ray's "PARTY GIRL"
presents
TATE -
BLUES
BAND
$1.50 at the door of the coffeehouse
that dares to be indifferent.

the
news today
by The Associated Press and Colbge Press Service

(Justice

Dept.

I

antitrust

suit,

THE WITHDRAWAL OF 25,000 TROOPS from South Viet-,
nam will begin with the puilout of 9,000 troops from the Mekong
Delta, the U.S. command said yesterday.
Besides the troops from the politically sensitive delta region,
7,000 marines will be pulled out of the northern areas of South Viet-
nam.
The departure of the men will begin with an airlift before mid-
July of a 900-man battalion, the command said. The remainder of the.
16,000 men now designated for withdrawal will be pulled out by the
end of August.
* *

hits

U.S. Steel

.4 4

ISRAELI PRIME MINISTER GOLDA MEIR told Britain yes-
terday her government unalterably opposes big power intervention
in the quest for peace in the Mideast.
Foreign Secretary Michael Stewart countered for the British gov-
ernment with the warning that negotiations among the Soviet Union,
Britain, France, and the United States probably offer the last chance
to head off a new war.,
The encounter, Mrs. Meir's first foreign mission as Prime Minis-
ter, came as British lawmakers built up pressure on the government
to explain why it is selling heavy arms to Arab states while denying
weapons to Israel.
Mrs. Meir has said the Big Four talks give Arab leaders the ex-'
cuse not to deal directly with Israel and she repeated this to Stewart
yesterday. She has argued that in the late 20th century it should be
inconceivable for great powers to settle the fate of shaller ones.
A SENATE JUDICIARY SUBCOMMITTEE approved yester-
day a bill designed to prevent a wide-open constitutional conven-
tion.
Thirty three of the required 34 states have submitted petitions
requesting a constitutional convention concerning reapportionment
of state legislatures.
The bill restricts any convention to the subject named in the
states' petitions and forbids a convention from m a k i n g general
changes in the constitution.
Sen. Sam J. Ervin (D-N. Carolina), chairman of the subcommit-
tee, says that this bill is necessary "if we are to avoid the threat of a,
major constitutional crisis."1
CHIEF JUSTICE DESIGNATE Warren E. Burger has contin-
ued in the post of trustee of the Mayo Foundation, a foundation
spokesman said yesterday.
"Until we have some indication otherwise, he would still be listed
as a trustee of the foundation," Mark G. Brataas, an administrator
of the Mayo Clinic, said in an interview.
Burger has been paid an honorarium of $2,000 a year for the last
three years to serve as one of the six public members of the founda-
tion's board of trustees. He also has received $1,500 in travel and oth-
er expenses.-
Last Tuesday the U.S. Judicial Conference adopted a resolution
prohibiting federal judges to accept compensation for non-judicial

-Associated Press
A walk in the garden
President " Nixon and Colombian President Carlos Lleras stroll
through White House grounds yesterday after a conference.
TO CONSOLIDATE LEFT:
Caucus announces
duca horn program

~TATE
4hTE,
0 -

PITTSBURGH (R)--- The Justice Department filed a civil
antitrust suit yesterday in U.S. District Court against U.S.
Steel Corp., charging it with an attempt to monopolize sales
of steel and steel produces by utilizing reciprocal purchase
agreements.
Concurrently, a proposed consent judgement was filed
that would prohibit U.S. Steel from engaging in any reciprocal
arrangements for 10 years.
Almost immediately, U.S. Steel, while not admitting to
any violation of the law, said it would not contest the charges

NOW
Shows at
Protet Now1:00-300
tAE RET 5:00-7:00
9:05
SHOWING

activities.
coffee
house
PRESENTS
JACK QUINE
FOLK etc. MUSIC
with GUITAR, BANJO, PIANO,
TONIGHT 9:00-1:00
605 E. William 50c

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students of the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at A.n Arbor, Michi-
gan, 420 Maynard St.. Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $9 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $2.50 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
BRING QU(CK RESULTS

By CAROL PINTEK
The Radical Caucus is sponsor-
ing an Education Program begin-
ning next week a n d running
through Oct. 21 which members
hope will consolidate the campus
left and precipitate discussion
throughout the University and the
community.
"The program is primarily for
radicals to get together and dis-
cus political issues," said Marc
Van Der Hout, a member of Rad-
ical Caucus a n d Executive Vice
President of Student Government
Council, "but anyone who is in-
terested is welcome to participate.
The more divergent opinions that
are expressed, the more stimulat-
ing the discussions will be."
"We want to discuss more deep-
ly the issues that are concerning
political activities," he said. "We
want people to think about what
they are doing when they sit-in or
take similar protest action."
tThe education program seeks to
utilize an informal type of forum
and bolster it with reading lists

and a discussion leader to provide
a structure in which fruitful com-
munication may result.
The reading lists have been the
biggest problem in organizing the
program. The undergraduate li-
brary has refused to place the nec-
essary boots on-closed reserve be-
cause the program is not given
for credit. Even if the books were
on reserve, they could not be used
by students who are not registered
for the summer term.
The caucus has asked Assistant
Dean James Shaw of the literary'
college to formulate a procedure
to make the books available
Until this is done, the readings
are available for use in the Radi-
cal Caucus office on the second
floor of the Student Activities
Building.
The first meeting of the pro-
gram, which is to be held Tues-
day, June 17, at 8 p.m. on the
third floor of the SAB, deals with
Black Liberation. The topics range
over a variety of subjects includ-
ing Third World Liberation and
Imperialism, Reform or Revolu-
tion and Perspective of the Stu-
dent Movement.
The Resistance, SDS, and Wo-
men's Liberation in addition to
the caucus will provide readings
and discussion leaders for the pro-
gram. SGC has donated up to $150
for advertising of the program.

in court and would accept the
judgment.
Atty. Gen. John N. Mitchell,
Washington, said the govern-
ment's complaint accused U.S.
Steel of entering into agreements
with various suppliers to restrain
trade by reciprocating purchases
in violation of the Sherman anti-
trust act.
The government charged the
reciprocity agreements had been
used since 1955 by U.S. Steel, the
nation's No. 1 steel producer.
U.S. Steel said in a statement
it would, in the near future, "ad-
vise all of is important custom-
ers and suppliers of the terms of
the judgement and the policies
which will be followed in
conformance therewith."
How the alleged - reciprocity
agreements were effected was not
specified in the government com-
plaint. However, U.S. Steel main-
tains numerous divisions through-
out the country engaging in a
variety of manufacturing activ-
ities.
The corporation said it inter-'
preted the judgment as designed
to prevent the use of reciprocity
to force in one way or another
suppliers of potential suppliers to
become or remain customers.
"Since these principles are in
accord with long-standing policies
of United States Steel," the state-
ment said, "it was decided to ac-
cept the proposed form of judg-
ment rather than contest in court
charges made in the complaint."
The Justice Department suit al-
legd U.S. Steel also entered into
arangements to boost the market
for its cement, chemical and other
products.
The suit contended the alleged
reciprocity foreclosed competitors
of big steel from selling substan-
tial quantities of goods and serv-
ices to the firm's customers ei'd
prevented suppliers from selling
goods and services to U.S. Steel.
The suit against U.S. Steel,
which had $4.5 billion in sales
last year, was the largest anti-
trust action filed by the Nixon
administration so far.
U.S. Steel is also a major pro-
ducer of coal, chemicals and ce-
ment. It owns stock in several rail-
roads and operates cargo vessels
for transportation 4f raw mate-
rials and steel products.

Use of
wiretap
supported
WASHINGTON OP) - The gov-
ernment claimed unprecedented
power yesterday to use electronics
surveillance "to protect the na-
tion from internal attack and sub-
version."
It said the entire question rest-
ed with the executive branch and
the judicial branch is not "com-
petent" to decide whether s u c h
wiretaps are justified.
The argument came in a me-
morandum filled- by the Justice
Department in U.S. District Court
in Chicago. It was in answer to
motions seeking government dis-
closure of information gained
about eight antiwar demonstrators
indicated in connection with dis-
orders during the 1968 Democra-
tic National Convention.
Contending it can wiretap for
domestic intelligence purposes
without court approval, the de-
partment said, "There can be no
doubt that there are today in this
country organizations which in-
tend to use force and other illegal
means to attack and subvert the
existing form of our government.
"Faced with such a state of af-
fairs," the memorandum asserted,
"Any President who takes serious-
ly his oath," will utilize electron-
ics surveillance on organizations
that "may be seeking to foment
violent disorders."
This stand was a broad exten-
sion of earlier court decisions that
held the president has constitu-
tional power to authorize wiretaps
for "foreign intelligence gather-
ing" purposes.
Similar considerations to those
in national security matters, the
memorandum said, "compel the
conclusion the President also has
constitutional power to gather in-
telligence information concerning
domestic organizations that seek
to attack and subvert the govern-
ment by unlawful means.

4

GADZOKS
MAD MARVIN AND HIS
FRIENDS AREEBACK!
THIS WEEK:
W. C. FIELDS
Te Barber Shop"
"The Pharmacist"
"The Golf Specialisi"
"Th Ara M ~i C

THE ALTERNATIV
Student-Faculty Co-Op Coffee House
Indoor-Outdoor S.A.B.-Aeross from Ad. Bldg.

-fi '. .. _ .

I i

1 " IA I I 1 1 1 1 III

W .

I'

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