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June 14, 1969 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1969-06-14

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, June 14, 1969

Iage Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

cinema"

poetry and prose Studentask

#I

Losing out with

By DREW BOGEMA
James Goldstone and Howard Rodman-
recent graduates from television film-
making--have directed and written a
movie: Winning, now playing at the State.
The movie makes it; not big, but, still, we
are given an enjoyable episode in the saga
of the American race-car driver. It doesn't
compare with Red Line 7000 or Grand
Prix--its rivals of late in the Hollywood
mania to make the automobiel a full-
fledged, real-life character. It doesn't make
it because of its script or because of its
direction, which are terrible at worst and.
tolerable at best. It makes it only because'
Paul Newm n plays the lead, bringing to a
clay role is enormous talent and sen-
tivity. He plays two roles really: the rugged,
determined, hard-boiled driver, and, the
shy, compassionate, quiet, and lonely
figure off the track. His 'performance is
one that gives us that rare treat of being
able to say that he, as a character, is real.
Stanley Kauffmann claims that Gold-
stone and Winning transmit the sensations
and impulses of speed better than Franken-
heimer did in Grand Prix. Kauffmann's
wrong. Only one scene in Winning comes
close to the photographic brilliance of
Grand Prix. This is the scene where New-
man pulls ahead of the leading car and
wins the Indy 500. Of course .it's the last
lap. Of course Newman started seventeenth
in the race and plays the hero as under-
dog. Of course Newman's chief competition
throughout most of the race is the guy he
found sleeping with his wife two days
earlier.
But this is incidental. Newman rides the
left-rear-tire of the lead car, and as they
hit the oval curve immediately before the
final straightaway and checker-flag, he

slides through, after several unsuccessful
tension-ridden attempts, the narrow open-
ing between his opponent's car and the
grass infield, taking the straightway at
open'throttle. In a sense the scene was very
similar to the one in Bullitt, a movie Gold-
stone and Rodman were clearly very im-
pressed with.
And then there's another, not a highly-
charged race car scene, mind you, but
rather just a well-directed scene. Gold-
stone and Rodman portray the racing cir-
cuit as a very oppressive, lonely, sterile,
phony,, in a word; uptight, place, and New-
man; as hero, does combat with these
forces. After winning a race in a small
town called Redford, Newman gets drunk,
strolls through the streets, and picks up
an Avis rent-a-car girl. They spree over
a period of weeks, an affair which ends in
marriage. There is no love here, only
loneliness, and as the circuit has beaten
and crushed the soul of the driver, its
demands and allures upon Newman crush
the marriage. Before qualification at the
Indy, Newman returns to his motel early,
only to find his wife in bed with his co-
driver.
Newman opens the door, in warm ex-
pectation of giving his wife some of the
scarce time she has desired of him ever
since they both took on the circuit. Seeing
the couple, Newman stops, self-consciously
closing the door, and stares at the scene
in bed. He takes two steps toward then as
his face gives rise to a rapid succession
of reactions: shock, pain, and futility take
hold of his emotions. He backs up to the
door, and after a long gaze of despair, he
leaves. This is real: Rodman's tiresome and
cliched dialogue are fortunately not per-
mitted to enter this sanctuary.

Vinning.
Goldstone and Rodman try to bring us
more of this, but the grandeur and glory of
the track, the tale of a victory at Indy
(such a delight to the comman man and
the suburb people), prevent them. Newman
(an acclaimed director in his own right
for Rachel, Rachel) probably would have
liked to explore in greater depth the rela-
tionship between his wife's background and
her lack of self-control when placed into
the highly competitive and harsh atmos-
phere that is the racing circuit. But the
requisites of filming a movie on Indy,
meaning a sizeable number of shots from
the actual event in order to illustrate
"realism", ruin any chance for scenes that
impress us as "true" to real life.
One must really pity the lack of ima-
gination evident in Goldstone at times
Every one of the spectators appear upper-
middle in socio-class status. When Gold-
stone and Rodman go beyond the story-
line of Newman and the track, when they
try to make a gallery look like a gallery, a
bar look like a bar, they fail. All we have
is good ole' middle-class chicishness.
Everyone is an obnoxious ass, everyone a
clown, except for Newman. Only Newman is
silent, reserved, discreet. Out of this "si-
lence" we respect him. But we respect the
character because of Newman's ability to
make the appropriate gesture or facial ex-
pression at the right time rather than the
director's idea of climate.
Facial-expression pre-empts cheap dia-
logue in Newman's book, and his wisdom
shows, itself constantly: the anguish of
victory, the difficulty of sharing emotions
with his wife, the bitterness and hatred
he feels for his co-driver. And this is where
movies are to be made.
And this is why Newman makes it.

Tribute to hlonor
Laugston Hughes

"mSi referendum on IM

A tribute to the late Lang-
ston Hughes will be held tonight
at 8 p.m. in Rackham Lecture
Hall for the benefit of a Lang-
ston Hughes Scholarship Fund
being established at the Univer-
sity.
Hughes. a black poet, play-

wright and humorist who died
two years ago, left. among his
effects a suggestion for the
tribute he would prefer friends
to have for him.
After a half-hour of recorded
music, including a new issue of
Hughes' Weary Blues-read by
the late author to a jazz ac-
companiment by Leonard Feath-
er-friends of Hughes able to
communicateexpressions of re-
gard in person, by telegram,
song, dance and taped message
will be presented.
Among these friends will be
Dizzy Gillespie, Duke Ellington,
Harold McKinney, Soupy Sales,
Vera 'Enbree, Allan Ward,
Jeanne Bates Frankel, Vic Da-
mone and poets Robert Hayden,
Margaret Danner, Oliver La-
Grone; Naomi Long Madgett,
Dudley Randall and Rosey Pool.
The program is being spon-
sored by the Ann Arbor Asso-
ciates for Productive Education-
al Experiences-graduate stu-
dents in adult education.
Tickets cost $2 for general ad-
mission; elementary and second-
ary students with identification
may attend for $1. Tickets will
not be sold at the door but are
available at the Union, League
and-at Discount Records, as uell
as from black history instructors
in the public schools. Tickets
are also being sold in De roit
for the event.

Continued frot Page 1
action to assessment of student
fees for funding of the facilities!
which revealed that 57 per centI
of students favor the plan.
However, the survey only, asks
whether students would accept
funding through "student fees"
and does not indicate that a tui-
tion increase would be necessary.
In addition, the survey was con-
ducted by a physical education
class learning how to conduct sur-
veys and no one was aware at the
time that the IM board was going
to use the survey.
Van Der Hout said that the IM
board and its chairman, athletic

committee pulled "a raunchy deal"
by holding closed meetings con-
cerning the funding of the intra-
mural facilities.
Stu Katz, spokesman for the
Tenants Union, said that students
should have had a role from the
beginning in the findings of the
IM committee.
R w .Iihits
city report

director Don Canham, betrayed (Continued from Page 1)
the students and their proposal state civil rights commission con-
shows a "total lack of concern for cerning racism at the Star Bar
student opinion." and in the police department, but
He added that during oven also against Larcom.
board sessions Canham had ir- "In the mean time, I think the
sisted it was not the committee's Democrats must consider whether
responsibility to propose methods this man (Larcom) can carry out
of funding. But in closed sessions any of their objectives," Rowry
Canham reversed his position and said.
recommended funding "in clear Rowry claimed Larcom was
defiance of student leaders opin- making a "personal attack" oi
ion that it is the right of student Cowley and has had a history of
body to decide the issue of fund- conflict with the HRC director.
ing."I wudb vr lerfo
Not all students expressed ad- "It would be very clear from
verse hostility to the committee's Larcom's statement that he nei-
findings though. Chris Bloch, En- ther wants Cowley nor an HRC
gineering Council representative to for this community," Rowr.;
SGC called it "a perfectly feasible claimed.
proposal." Cowley said yesterday he is call-
He added that he did not think ing a special HRC meeting for
$15 per semester was requesting Sunday to discuss the report. He
too much, especially in view of the will recommend to HRC that the
fact that intramural facilities were state civil rights commission be
in desperate need of repair. brought into the case. Cowley had
Bloch, however, said he felt the no other comment at that time.

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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r mto
Room ' 352S L.A.S. Bldg., before
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Notices may be published a maxi-
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Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices a r e
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
SATURDAY, JUNE 14
Day Calendar
Conference. of Small Magazine Editors
and Publishers: Saturday, June 14
from 2:00 to 10:00 p.m., ,in Auditorium
B, Angell Hall and from 2:00 to 5:00
p.m. in rooms 2411, 2412, 2413, 2417,
Mason Hall,
Cinema Guild: Barbara Stanwyck and
Henry Fonda in The Lady Eve: Arclhi-
tecture Auditorium, 7:00. and 9:05 p.m.
SI[JNDAY, JUNE 15
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar: "Management of Managers, Pro-
gram No, 92": North Campus Commons,
8:15 a.m.1
Dearborn Campus Graduation Exer-
cises: Gertrude V. Huebner, Regent of
the University of Michigan, Comn-
mencement Speaker: Ford Motor Com-
pany, Central Office Bldg. Auditorium
(Michigan Avenue and Southfield Ex-
pressway), 2:00 p.m.j
MONDAY, JUNE 16
College and University Administra-
tion institute: Registration: Rackham
Lobby, 8:15 a .m.
------COUPON -----m
t La
THOMPSON'S
PIZZA
7 -
u 761-0001
I 1

Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
roar: "Management of Managers, Pro-
gram No. 92": North Campus Commons,
8:15 a.m. {
School ofr Social Work Continuing
Education Institute: Sallie R. Churchill
and Richard A. English, University of
Michigan School of Social Work,
"Groupwork as Treatment"; 232 Phy-
sics Bldg., 9:00 a.m. John Tropman;
University of Michigan School of Social
Work and William Neenan, Economics
Department, University of, Michigan,
"Tools for Planners'and Administra-
tors": 224 Physics Bldg., 9:00 a.m. Paul
Glasser and Norma 'adin, University
of Michigan School of Social Work,
"Preventive. Intervention in W o r k
with Parents: A New Dimension in So-
cial Work": Lobby, Physics Bldg., 9:00
a.m.

Doctoral

Exams

Dixon Raymond Doll, Electrical En-
gineering, Dissertation: "Efficient Al-
location of Resources. in Centralized
Computer-Communication Network De-
sign," on Saturday, June 14 at 9:00 a.m.
in 1085 East Engineering Building,
Chairman: K. B. Irani.
Stephen George Holtzman, Pharma-
cology, Dissertation: "Body Tempera-
ture and Operant Behavior as Baselines
for the Evaluation of Morphine-Like
Physical Dependence Capacity," on
Monday, June "16 at 9:00 am. in 6th
floor conference room, Medical Sci-
ence Building, Chairman: M. H. Seev-
ers.
William Roy Haushalter, Speech, Dis-
sertation: "The Programming of Plat-
form Artists at The University of Mich-
igan, 1912-1961," on Monday, June 16
at 4:00 p.m. in 2020 Frieze Building,
Chairman: L. L. Okey.
Placement Service
GENERAL DIVISION
3200 S.A.B.
Current Position openings received by
General Division, inquire about these
positons and applcation procedures by
calling 764-7460, or stop in at 3200;
S.A.B.
To the best of our knowledge all of

the companies listed below are equal
opportunity employers. Practically
without exception these companies are
stressing the desire to interview minor-
ity group candidates. Inasmuch as
businesses of all types are making a
real effort to reach the student body
regardless of race, creed, sex, or re-
ligion we encouage you to stop in at
Placement Sevres, room 3200 SAB and
explore current openings.
Equal Employment Opportunity Pro-
gram of U.S. Department of State:
Junior Diplomats, degree assignments
in areas of admin., counselor affairs,
econ. aff., political aff., public aff., and
research. Mid-career positions, several
years approp. exper and degree eq., age
31. Foreign Service Nurses and Medical
Officers. Diplomatic Couriers, min. 2
yrs. college.
- Thurson Lumber Co., Howell, Mich.:
Forester for estimating farm wood lots
in this area.
Field Educational Publications Inc.,
Palatine, Ill.: Sales Representatives,

educ. trng./exper. pref., some sales or
business exper. pref.
Shiawassee County YWCA, Owosso,
Mich.: Executive Director and Y-Teen
Youth Program Dir.
City of Milwaukee, Wisc.: Planner,
MA and 3 yrs. exper. Tech. and Maine
Serv. Supv., ME, CE, Arch and exper.
Econ. Geog, MA and 4 yrs exper., Mu-
seum Artist, degree and 6 yrs, exper.

SUMMER PLACEMENT
SERVICE
'12 S.A.B., Lower Level:
Bucyrus-Erie Company, South Mil-
waukee, Wisconsin seeks architectural
student for summer work, want some-
one available now, or after end of
spring - ?z term in late June. Ex-
cellent salary. Further details at S.P.S.,
come to 212 S.A.B.

NEVER SOTIMEI.YNE:VER SO OREATI
SEE IT DURING THE 25TH
ANNIVERSARY YEAR OF D-DAY
'. DARRXL.ZANUK S
THE
DAY WITH 4?NERNA TOVAI. O7MR/
assed onthe Boak AYCORMNWU RYAN RehesO7 yRO CoWmyPse
STARTS WEDNESDAY f

DIAL 5-6290

"A New York version of
'The Graduate'! I rre-
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General

Notices

Senate Assembly: Monday, June 16,
1969, 3:15 p.m., Rackham Amphitheater,
Agenda: 1. Consideration of the min-
utes of the May 19, 1969 meeting. 2.
Announcements and communication.
3. Report of SACUA activities for the
past month. 4. Discussion of the Re-
port on the establishment of a Senate
Advisory Committee, Professor Rehmus.
5. Ad hoc Bylaws.

i ams of REAL Q nm N.Y, iimssnb "
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ANN ARBOR DANCE THEATRE
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MILLER and SEVENTH STREETS
Modern and Primitive Dance-Live Music
7:00 P.M. SATURDAY, June 14th
4:00 P.M. SUNDAY, June 15thA
Tickets Available at:
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FREE buses'will run qt 6:20 P.M. and 6:40 P.M. on Saturday, June 14th
3:20 P.M. and 3:40 P.M. on Sunday, June 15th
from the corner of N. University and State to West Park.

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