100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 09, 1968 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-05-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

A THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thu

The Pigf ckers

HOUSE DECISION?
How Wallace could a
PRINCETON, N.J. P; -- If the Seven of the 10 candidates one
U.S. presidential election were the pro-Wallace presidential elec-t
held today, the candidacy of for- tor slate nominated in Tuesday'sr
mer Alabama Gov. George Wal- Democratic primary are public
lace could mean the election officials, and one, Lt. Gov. Albertz
would have to be decided by the Brewer, became governor on elec-
House of Representatives, accord- tion day when Wallace's wife,
ing to the Gallup Poll. Gov. Lurleen Wallace, died..
Based on polls conducted by All 10 are pledged to support
the American Institute of Public Wallace for president rather thani
Opinion, director George Gallup the national party nominee chosen
said . yesterday that third party at the Democratic convention in
candidate Wallace could deny Chicago in August, thus enablingt
either major party candidate the Wallace to run in Alabama on'
electoral votes needed to win. the Democratic ticket.-
DEEP SOUTH SPLINTER PARTIES
According to Gallup, Wallace t ai an aBriga
could win 30 per cent of the vote David Vann, a Birmingham
in the 13-state region of the attorney and leacher of one of twoz
South. His biggest tally in that newly formed splinter Democrat"
region-53 per cent-would come parties swearing allegiance to the
from the five states generally re- national party, has questioned1
garded as the Deep South, sup- the right of public officials to!
port far surpassing that given serve as electors.
candidates of either major party. Vann says it would violate a1
"If Wallace were to win the 47 constitutional barrier against any-
electoral votes of the five Deep oneoccupying two offices of profE
South states-and current vurvey it and trust. And he has talked ofI
evidence suggests that this is like- filing a federal court suit if the
ly-both major party candidates Wallace slate is victorious in No-
could be prevented from receiving vember and the public officialsI
a majority of he electoral vote assume the duties of electors.
needed to win," Gallup said. But even if the challenge were1
This would mean that the elec- successful, Wallace still would
tion would have to be decided by have the benefit of a state law
the incoming House of Represen- which governs the filling of va-
tatives, where each state would
have one vote. How the states i
would vote would depend entirely
upon the outcome of the House
elections of November 1968.
Gallup said the likelihood of
the election being thrown into
the House would be greatest if the ENDING
contest between major party can-
didatestwere close, both in terms TONIGHT
of the popular and electoral votes.
CLOSE CONTES'T
He added that recent surveys Af1JN
showed a close race between
Richard Nixon, top choice of rank'HE
and file Republicans, and lead- IN 80 DAYS
ing Democratic contenders Sens.
Robert Kennedy and Eugene Mc- D dDyv Gantin ls
Carthy. P
Gallup said national support,
for Wallace is four times that won M s
by States' Rights candidate Sen.
J. Strom Thurmond in the 1948
election. In that election, Thur-NE
mond won 30 electoral votes and
carried four Southern states, Ala-
bama, Louisiana,'Mississippi, and'
South- Carolina.
Gallup -added that in 1964, FRIDAY: "Coot Hand Luke
these states and Georgia and Ari-
rona went to Sen. Barry Gold Daily Classifie
Wallace faces potential legal

ffect '68
cancies among the electors. It re-
quires the remaining electors to
make the appointments.
And three of the ne4ly nomi-
nated candidates on the Wallace,

Continued from Page 1II
very pleasant stay. We wish we
never had to come."I

ing money by maKing nap
And, he added, "I wish we'd
started, but we can't stop
w.hen * hc -veramnnt nppd,

slate are private citizens. In the light of his failure at the 11u4t uegA e t AA1ik
The seven public officials could stockholders' meeting, Fernandez weapon.
resign as electors and the others- said later he "won't come back He later modified this
attorney Frank Mizell of Mont- for a year." "They might get rid ment, saying napalm br
gomery, Mrs. James B. Allen\ of of their contract by then," he .small profits and that th
Gadsden and Mrs. Armistead added. resources could be put t
Selden of Greensboro - could CALCAV representatives met profitable tasks.
name their successors. with Dow President Herbert Doan "The primary point," sa:
Mrs. Allen and Mrs. Selden are and Gerstacker before the stock- "is as long as those peo
the wives 'of the top two candi- holders' meeting. over there we're not going
dates for the U.S. Senate who However, Fernandez said he sign them to death."
went into a runoff primary as a ou come back et wee"I think there are weap
result of Tuesday's vote. Gerstacker resigned. "Mr. Doan "Iatink he ruedare ,"ea
is quite open and willing to talk," nations have ruled out, sa
WALLACE SLATE he said. "Mr. Gerstacker is not." stacker, and I think propE
The public officals on the Wal- Displaying anti-war -and anti- But he said napalm was
lace slate, besides Brewer, are napalm signs, over 400 people World War II and in the
Dist. Atty. -Earl Morgan of Bir- kept a vigil outside the stock- War biUt was never out-la
mingham, Secretary of State Ma- ' holders' meeting. At least 20 "The real issue is the wa
bel Amos, Atty. Gen. MacDonald Northwood Institute and Midland Gerstacker. "and if tlat's 1
Gallion, Agriculture Commission- High School students stood in issue you're going at it
er Richard Beard, \State Treas- support of Dow's position. You seem to want us to
urer Agnes Baggett and State At the earlier confrontation, to our country what it she
School Supt. Ernest Stone., Gerstacker had said Dow was "los. We don't believe in this."
They haven't said they might ~ ~~~ ~~
resign as electors, or even hinted
at it. But they could. More likely,
they would first resist a court
suit, contending an elector does o ' C
not occupy an office of profit and
trust FEATURI
-aA

e.'O L
stat
ings
e sar
o mc
Lid Do
ple a
to c
ins th
aid GE
erly s(
used
Kore
rwed.

'Napalm protesters
fail to sway Dow

Hthe Depot House

By SHERRI FUNN
and, SUZY FUNN
We have headaches. It all
started about 8:00 last night
when we left home to see the
Figpuckers at the Depot House,
down at 416 South Ashley.
As we hopped into Sherri's
new sports roadster we had a
'premonition that it was gonna
be a freaky night. We talked
about the review we were
gonna write.
SUZY: You talk to them, and
I'll just nod my head.
SHERRI: Oh, no you don't.
SUZY: Let go get an ice
cream instead.
SHERRI: Groovy.
After we had finished our
tasty single-dip cones and
brushed off a couple of high
school types who were after our
bodies, we headed back to the
Depot.
SUZY: There it is, it's a
old railroad station.
SHERRI: Of course it is, you
dumb broad. -
We were a little wary of the
place as we walked to the door'
manly because we couldn 't
find .the door. But that diffi-
culty was soon overcome and
when we walkedinwe met
Jack, who runs the place.
JACK: Hey, man, yeah.
SHERRI: Yeah, well, we're'
from the paper and we're gonna
review the Pickfugers and
here's the paper that, says it.
,JACK: (feeling paper) Yeah,
well, I'm' hip. Just go in and,
well, have a good time, you
know?
SHERRI: Yeah.
JACK: You're hip to the
s ound we have tonight, uh
right? I mean, it's a jazz group
and on weekends we have acid
rock and we move the tables
back so you can dance and a
psychedelic light show, you
know?
SHERRI: Yeah,
SUZY: (slowly moving away)
Yeah.
Well, we soon made our way
to a table up in front and
looked around us. Lots of little
tables and funny lights and all
six people were grooving to the
sounds of WKNR on the sound
system. People without hair-
cuts were walking around on
the stage hitting drums and
~tuff.-
SHERRI: Wanta leave?
SUZY: Naah.
- SHERRI: I can't get into tlis.
After about an hour of read-
ing the groovy psychedelic post-
ers (like "Iet the Earth bring
forth grass." Ho He. Get it?)
The band moved in for their
3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1282
Between Ypsilanti and Ann Arbor
k1liry.a"

first set. But instead they put
on a record and walked away.
Then they did play.
SHERRI: Hey, Suzy, can you
hear me? Do you know any-
thing about jazz?
SUZY: I can't hear you./
The cat on the little saxo-
phone was blowing pretty good.
And another guy just stood
there. And we couldn't hear
anything.
Just then' Sherri decided she
,hould make a phone call. But
w'ho should she ruin into but
Jack.
JACK: We havent mage any
money but it'sa non-profitor-
ganization. We just want
enough bread for the lights and
the rent and a place you can
come with your chickie or your
-wife !and leave with! a smile,
,We just Want you to be able to
leave with a smile.
SHERRI; Yeah,
JACK: I mean, I can get
where I'm going in a Volkswa-
god just as good as a Cadillac,
right? And you don't have to
work in a factory for forty
years to be happy.
SHERRI: Yeah.
JACK: We just want you to
leave with a smile, that's all
Sherri walkedabback to the
table thinking about how some<
people really know their oats.
Too '>ad, she said to herself.
By this time the band was
into the mid le of its first num-
ber and the cat on sax wa
really, really grooving with it.
But after awhile it became
evident that the igpuckers are
a lot of noise, mostly white
noise, that is less than stim-
ulating,
SUZY. I got a headache.
SHERRI: Me too. Let's go.
As , we picked our way
through the 17 or so patrons
(at a buck each), we noticed
our friend Bill, a regular jazz
p ficiando, entering with his
wife.
SHERRI: Hey Bill, what d'ya
think of these guys?
BILL: They're a lot of noise,
man, a lot of noise. ike they're
not playing anything,
SHERRI: You mean a mel-
ody?
BILL: Naah. You don't have
to play a melody or anything,
but .it's got to make you think
of something, you know? Lie
anything, a forest, a mountain,
CINEMA GUILD
THE MARX BROS.
IN
NORSEFEATHERS

anything.
noise.

These guys are just

It

We told him we had to split
and he said see ya. a
We walked out to Sherri's
'sports coupe at an even pace.
SUZY: Hey, I got a head-
ache.
SHERRI: Ya know, I do too.
Thirty seconds of silence.
SUZY: And we aren't smiling.
The Sunshine Company s pet
rabbit crawled up Graham
Nash's sleeve at Washington
D.C.'s airport when the Hol-
lies last visited the United
-States.
One of the year's best singles,
'Portable People" by Ten Years
After is not getting any play
in this area and wasn't even
included in the group's first
album.
The Rascals are filming a
full length flick this summer.
If you want to hear the Bos-
ton sound before it got all
hyped up by MGM with all
.of those -terrible albums, get
ahold of the Remains' album
on Epic. It's great.

Dark"

Metro Goldwyn-Mayer
Anthony _Anjanette Charles I II
-,Quinn Cme .so n
-FRANMSCOPEand t0 r r
at 1 :00-4:20-7:45
* * PLUS! * *

ds Get Results

*0

problems in his thus far-success-
ful elector battle in Alabama. But
he probably will be able to over=-
come them if they arise.

NAINA-3E f CRORTO

6th
GREAT
WEEK

NAINLGNRLCROAIN FOX EASTERN T-EATRES l
FOR VILLaGE
375 No. MAPLE RD..}769-100

Mon.-Fri.
7:00-9:20

DIAL
5-6290

'40mg

Today Is .
LADIES' DAY
Shows ot 1, 3,
5, 7, 9 P. M.

SAT.-- :00-5:00-7:00-9:20 SUN.-1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:20

i0

"LA RGER TH AN LIFE-AND JUST
POSSIBLY TWICE AS SHOCKING!"
-SATURDAY REVIEW
*** !DOUBLE-EDGED SEX !"
--N.Y DAILY NEWS

I

W NNER TWO ACADEMY AWARDS
BEST ACTRESS-KATHARINE HEPBU

URN

BE

ST SCREEN PLAY

SANDbY DENNI$

KEIR DULLEA

THEI "
C

D. 11 LAWRENCE'S

COLUMBIA PICTURES presens 6
Stanley Kramer
prodoc~on
Spencer Sidney
TRACY POITIER
Katharine
HERN

t
i guess
h -*,
conOng'
to dinner.
TECHNICOLOR

I

f 4 aRPRNSIhW and mt7iwujwiRMGM
L.J at 2:50-6:15-9:35I

SOSTEXTRAORDINARY FMI"

-NEW YORK TIMES

0i

MOST yEXCI'rItu
.A%,MEANIfitFUL
1FIMItiNENRs i"
--LIFE MAAINE
~RE AIK BLEI
BEAUTIIFLI THE
BEST OF ITS KIt4Ul"
NEW YORKER MAGAZINE
DAILY N''v

4RV

FRENCH
kCOLONEL.
wo was
forced even.
O"NE O
WOMEN,.
who
stopped
at nothing
towin!

41

I

II-roucho becomes President
of a collage.
FR DAY.& SATURDAY
7:00 & 9:05

I

I

WED.-SAT.-SUM. .
t-3-5-7-9
OTHER DAYS 7:00-9:00

I

ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
75c

7

i.

I

0.

-
® _ . .

n.
__ ,;!

11

FRIDAY and SATURDAY at
PAMELA

POWERFUL!
-NEWSWEE MACGAZ"E

TUE
ALGERIAN
STREETI
BOY.
who became
a rebel
hero!

4

ITLEOF

LU dPm-M WSAW

1111

i

11

0

;w1 ! m

.- :::

M-

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan