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May 01, 1968 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-05-01

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Page Two

THE MICHI AN DAILY

Page To THE ICHIGASDAIL
music
And now., the May Festival!

- r

Columbia president
cancels all classes

' . a

4th WEEK

By R. A. PERRY
At a time when musical, es- -
tivals spring up like potential
slogans and artists spend their
summers flying from Tangle-
wood to Dubrovnik, it is sur-
prising and gratifying to be
reminded that the "May Festi-
val" sponsored by the Univer-
sity Musical Society this year
celebrated its 75th Anniversary.
There has been no special theme
to Ann Arbor's music festival,
no focus on one composer or
one epoch, and consequently
programming has often un-
imaginatively stuck to the
standard works, but adiin-
istrators Charles Sink and
Gale Rector strive to make
quality the keynote of their
presentations.
The May Festival is no local,
small-time operation. Nearly
every great musician who con-
certized in America has played
to the Ann Arbor audience. In
1940, for instance, Artur Schna-
bel, Joseph Szigeti, Giovanni
Martinelli, Emanuel Feuer-
mann, and Lily Pons all per-
formed' in one May Festival
series. Such a cast of greats,
nothing short of fantastic,
Re ents
en ties
with IDA
(Continued from Page 1)
the requirements for certification
of the student in a professional or
technical field after graduation
preclude violations of civil law or
when the student's continuation
in the University wold pose a
"clear and present danger to him-
self or other iembers of the
community," the U n i v e r s i t y
should axer ise regulatory p5owers.
sOn classified research, the Re-
gents qualified their approval of
the Elderfield Report by stating
that the report's recommended
policy is not applicable "when the
nation is engaged in a declared
war"
The report specifies that the
University may accept classified
research contracts if sponsor and
recipient of the' grant can be
made public and the project dos
not develop ways to "destroy hu-
man life."
The Regents directed the vice
president for research to report
Son the implementation of the new
policy.
The Regents also passed a reso-
lution urging the executive .offi-
cers of the University to "encour-
age students, faculty, staff, alum-
ni and friends to provide funds
for &n endowment for a Martin
Luther King faculty chair."
A faculty fund drive had been
previously initiated by Prof. Dem-
ing Brown of the Slavic languages
department to raise funds for a
King chair.
The Regents said, "If sufficient
funds are not raised' by Septem-
ber 1, 1968, to support a chair,
contributions received will be
transferred .to the Martin Luther
K ng Scholarship Fund."

makes up for any war-horse,
programming.
This year's May Festival,
which took place from April 20
to April 23 in Hill Aud., no-
where matched the 1940 series,f
Or even last year's concerts,
which brought Rostropovich,
Vishnevskya, and' Van Cliburn
to Ann Arbor, but if offered
sufficient aural splendoi to
gratify the music-lover and
enough outstanding perform-
ances to compensate for the
very bad moments that also'
occrred.
For the thirty-third con-
secutive season, the' Philadel-
phia Orchestra, under the ba-
ton of that effervescent munch-
kin Eugene Ormandy, provided
the foundation for and exe-
cuted the major part of the'
five concerts' offerings.
Soloists included pianists
Claude Frank and Anthony Di
Bonaventura, sopranos Eileen
Farrell and Judith Raskin, con-
tralto Jean Sanders, tenor Leo-
- polddSimoneau, and baritonq
Theodor Uppman. Thor John-
son guest-conducted two con-
certs, and the University Choral
t Society tried their best.
Last year .the Philadelphia
Orchestra was sloppy and truly
seemed on vacation, but this
year there was a sincere fervor
and attentiveness to their work.
The Philadelphia Orchestra is
often denigrated in this decade
which lauds most highly the
ultra-precision of the Cleveland
ensemble, or the striving for
historically authentic styles
that marks many of the new
baroque chamber groups. And
it is true that Ormandy often
tackles Bach works that- are
best done in Munich, Or Haydn
symphonies more finely turned
in Cleveland, but in works
which do not require any au-
thentic angst or special class-
ical grace, the Philafdelphia
excels.
They are essentially a group
Iof colorists and for that reason
their all-Russian cpncert was
beautiful indeed. The Russians
have always emulated the
French not only in literature
and fashion but also in music;
and though it may be an over-
simplification, Rachmani off
may be seen as a Russian De-
bussy. His third symphony, a
brooding work with open, long
themes, is constantly alive and
transforming" itself from_ with-
in.'
By contrast, the Shostako-
vich Fifth Symphony, while a,
more tightly constructed work,
has 'had much of Rachmani-
noff's (and Tchaikovsky's)
Russian color bleached out of
it. Whereas Rachmaninoff's
developmental sections do oc-
> casionally 'meander in a mind-
less peripatetic way, Shostako-
vich's "business" tends to find
itself in bleak, barren corners
where the, only salvation is td'
return to the monumental. Both

symphonies explore .the To-
mantic landscapes of the mind,
and they received stirring,
powerful renditions, in which
the Philadelphia string achiev-
ed their famed singing sheen
that one often missed in their
other concerts. I can think of
no other orchestra that could
achieve the richly laden palette
of sounds that illuminated these
Russian symphonies.
Does anyone really listen to
the music in Brahms; or better
yet, is. there really anything to
listen to? Mahler summed it up
by saying that "only in the
rarest cases does Brahms know
what to dd with his frequently
lovely themes." His inventive-
ness was truly small, his use of
pedal point and unison writing
unbearably tedious, especially
when heard as often as one
does in tod'ay's concert halls.
The First Symphony was played'
beautifully by the orchestra, but
when lovely themes are crowned
only by mounting grandilo-
quence and heart-on-sleeve
gemutlich, who cares?
I might as well get the other
piece of bad news out of_ the
way, and it concerns Brahms,
too. Led by a discerning hand
and sung with some mind to
the definition of the inter-
weaving choral voices, the
Brahms' Requiem can produce
the lovely effect akin to falling
asleep in a snowstorm. Led by
the well-meaning but perfunc-
tory hand of-Thor Johnson and
sung with total blah by the
University Choral Society, the
piece can make you want to
leave early, which many people
did.
Last year, of the University
Chorus, I wrote "producing a
broad wash of monochromatic.
sound, they were neither off or
on the note, but somewhere
equidista'nt around it." Well,
they still have not found the
mark. They still lack definition,
direction, style, lift, penetra-
tion, and force, but perhaps
most serious is their lack of

definition. It is truly impossible
to tell when the altos or basses
enter; even when watching
their mouths opening you can
detect no sound, at least from
the first balcony.
The young pianist Claude
Frank made some embarrass-
ing mistakes in Mozart's Piano
Concerto No. 18, but he also.
produced one of the loveliest,
most plastically-shaped piano
performances I have heard in
a while. The influence of his
mentor Schnable was apparent
in the intelligent and always
deeply felt way in which he
molded the musical line. His
splendid technique in trills and
arpeggio runs always served
this plastic end. He likewise
made the silence between notes
eloquent and meaningful.
Exhibiting his usual rhyth-
mic and melodic ingenuity, Bar-
tok's second piano concerto re-
ceived , an accomplished and
flashy performance, not with-
out attention to the occasional
moments of introspection, from
Anthony di Bonaventura. If
anything, di Bonaventura was
too gentle.
The Kate Smith of opera,
Eileen Farrell, sang an una-
bashedly mundane group of
Puccini and Verdi arias in an
awesomely powerful and clear-
toned voice that made one wish
she were presenting the Wes-
endonck lieder she used to do
so well.
Compared to Miss Farrell's
clarion call, the soprano voice
of Judith Raskin sounded min-
iscule, but it was more finely
controlled andtexpressively used
than Miss Farrell's. In an odd
way that was her problem, for
Miss Raskin too often sacri-
fices line for expression; this
was certainly true in Mozart's
Exsultate, Jubilate, her singing
of which did not approach the
joyfulness and tonal beauty of
Erna Berger's Angel recording.
In any case, Miss Raskin is
best heard on records and not
in a large hall such as Hill Aud.

(Continued from Page 1)
cratic Society chairman Mark
Rudd said, "Even the jocks, the
same guys who last week were
yelling 'SDS must go!' today were
running around screaming 'Kirk
must go!' and 'Cops must go!'
SDS and a black students' group
organized the protest against the
gym construction last week and
were later joined by white and
black non-students.I
As many as 200 faculty mem-
bers had voiced support of the
proposed strike.dAn ad hoc com-
mittee of 400 faculty members
met yesterday afternoon but
reached no decision after a large
majority of those present walked
out. The "rump caucus" of about
125 remaining faculty members
had voted to join the strike.
The administration - requested
police action, the subsequent call
for a general strike, and the spon-
taneous demonstrations and stu-
dent and faculty meetings arising
out of the events yesterday ap-
pears to have plunged the campus
into confusion. Few of the partici-
pants and observers entirely un-
derstood the situation or could
predict with any "certainty what
will happen at the university in
the next few days.

The strike plans, announced
early yesterday morning by stu-
dent council president Dan Pel-
legrin, appeared to have had
widespread student support. The
Associated Press reported that
groups roamed the Manhattan
campus calling for Kirk's ouster.
Earlier, in a rare convening of
the entire faculty of the Morning-
side Heights campus, the assem-
bled faculty members voted for a
one-day inquiry by students and
faculty members. The faculty didt
not support the strike.
Journalism Prof. Howard Wood
emerged from one closed session
to report that a majority favored
an effort to go "as fast as we
could toward the resumption of
orderly processes."
Rudd said many faculty mem-
bers were angered at Kirk's deci-
sion to request police to evict stu-
dents from the five buildings. "I
don't think Kirk can last," he said.
"The faculty is completely against
him."
'Most of the 628 arrested have
been released either on recogni-
zance or on up to $100 bond.
Meetings of students, including
SDS and an ad hoc student strike
coordinating committee are slated
for this morning.

SANDY DENN:S -KEIR DULLEA - ANNE HEYWOOD
AS ELLEN MARCH
(ir/ide ll
contle Palid
D. H. LAWRENCE
,Suggested for mature audiences --symbol of Ihe male
Screenplay by LEWIS JOHN CARLINO and HOWARD KOCH
Produced by RAYMOND STROSS
Directed by MARK RYDELL
Color by Deluxe--from CLARIDGE PICTURES

Q~TATIE

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ENDS THURSDAY
The Story of a girl
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key she gave to a
different man
each month.

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